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Full text of "San Francisco Newsletter"

SDD7 ISODIfll b 

California State Library 



€ 







Extract from the Political Code. 

Section 22'J6. Books may be taken from the Library 
by the mkmrkhs of the Legislature, during the sessions 
thereof, and by other State officers at any time. 

Sec. 2298. The Controller, if notified by the Librarian 
that any officer has failed to return books taken by him 
within the time prescribed by the Rules, and after demand 
made, must not draw his warrant for the salary of such 
officer until the return is made, or three times the value of 
the books, or of any injuries thereto, has been paid to the 
Librarian. 

Sec. 2299. Every person who injures or fails to return 
any book taken is liable to the Librarian in three times 
the value thereof. 

Ko person shall take or detain from the General Library 
more than two volumes at any one time, or for a longer 
period than two weeks. Books of retrench shall not be 
taken from the Library at ANY time. — [Extract from the 
Rules. 

■ftS^The foregoing Regulations will be strictly enforced,*T*» 






Tho Special Organ of "Marriott's Aoroplano Navigation Co."--Fred. Marriott, Patentoo. 

Price p.-r Cjpy. in Casta.] ' ESTABLISHED JULY, 80. 136ft I Annual Subscription, t5. 



■ .\j3 ^^.^33.7) 







(Ealifornut 



DEVOTED TO THE LEADING INTERESTS OF CALIFORNIA AND THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Vol. 28 



SAN FBAU0IS0O, SATURDAY, JAN. 26, 1878 



No. 1. 



Ortlce«t of Ihr N»n Frnncisco New** Letter, ami California Mail 

Bit*. ■ ■ ""■'■' ftanclsco. 

GOLD BAB ' SlLvro Bars -6@1G pceat. disc. Treasury 

dexican Dollars, 6©6j 
percent, disc. Trade Doll r cent. 

tar K\ Ni w York, \ per cent, for GflH ; Currency, — @| per 

• premium. On London, Bankers, 49&d. ; Commercial. 49|d.(S 
Paris, 5 franco p*r dollar. Telegrams, G.~»-100{fl^ per cent. 

W Latest price of Gold at New York, Jan. 25, at 3 p.m., lOlg. Latest 
price of Sterling. 

*S" Price of Money here, 9® 1 per cent, per month. — bank rate. In the 
I remand active. 

PRICE3 OF LEADING STOCKS AND GOVERNMENT BONDS. 

Sax Francisco January 25, 1S78. 



Stock* and Bonds. 

OS 1867-33 

. der Notes 

. . 
la, 7a — 

I Bonds.. 
■ >nds, 3a. . 

National *; B'fc & Trust Co, 
Spring Valley Water Co 



Bid 


Attend 


104 


105 


03! 


B 


102 


101 


106 


10S 


28 


29 


07 


— 


100 


— 


90 


00J 


m 


SO ll 


in 


92 !| 



Stocks and Bonds. 

Omnibus Railroad Co 

Central Railroad Co...* 

N. B. and Mission ft. It. Co 
Front St,M.& '>. H. R. Co 

Fireman's Fund Ins. Co 

Union Insurance Co 

Pacific Bank 

The Bank of California 

Central J'aciiic Kailroad.. . 



70 


75 


70 


72* 


22 


25 


95 


100 


105 


110 


110 


115 


91 


95 


85 


86 



THE LATEST WAR TELEGRAMS. 
London, January 25th. —The Daily Telegraph prints the following 
ntinople : The Turkish delegates have been ordered to sign 
peace preliminaries. An armistice will probably be concluded to-day. 
The conditions are stated to include the following: Servia to be inde- 
pendent without compensation ; Montenegro to receive Antivari, Nicsics 
and Spuz. and a portion of Turkey bordering on Lake Scutari. Russia 
to hold Batoum, Kars and Erzeroum until a war indemnity of £20,000,- 
000 is paid. The Dardanelles to be opened to Russian men-of-war. Bul- 
garian autonomy to be cuncedod rather on the principle of the Lebanon 
protectorate than on the plan of the Constantinople conference, and Tur- 
key to nominate a Christian Governor for a long term of years, subject to 
ratification by the Powers. Bulgaria is not understood to include Thrace, 
but only to extend to the line of the Balkans. A part of the Russian 
army is to enihark at "Constantinople on their return home, and a final 
treaty of peace is to be signed at Constantinople by Grand Duke Nich- 
olas. This arrangement will satisfy Russian honor without involving the 
occupation of ' 'onstantinople. There is no mention of Roumania in this 
dispatch. The Standard says : The news that the Russian terms of 
peace have been made known to the Porte, and are now being accepted 
by it, comes opportunely to temper the excitement and exaggerated 
alarm that foolish people Alight otherwise have felt at the intention of 
the Government to move on Monday for a supplementary credit. We do 
not hesitate to say that the mere fact that a delay of four days is to clause 
before the motion comes on, is a sufficient indication that, in the opinion 
of the Government, the peril against which it is to guard 
us is by no means pressing ; though it is absolutely necessary 
that Russia should receive a hint that she lias tried our patience too long. 
The Globe says it has reason to believe that there is no foundation what- 
ever for the statement that instructions have been forwarded to the com- 
mander of the Mediterranean fleet at Sarns to land near Boulair a force 
of marines and blue jackets to act as ad interim defenders of the lines of 
Gallipoli, and also have six of his roomiest ships ready to bring up the 
mass of the Malta garrison. The Globe also says it has reason to believe 
that Lord Derby will remain in the Cabinet. 

Latest from the Merchants' Exchange. — New York, Jan. 25th, 
1878.— Gidd opened at 10U ; 11 A. m., at 10U ; 3 P. m., at 101§. United 
States Bonds — Five-twenties of lsti7. HV.f; 1881, 106J. Sterling Ex- 
change, 4 83@4 So. 1 ,, short. FacificMail, 231. Wheat, strong, £1 40(5 $1 47, 
dull. Western Union, 77i. Hides, 19*@20£. oil Sperm, si 03@$1 05. 
Winter Bleached, $1 23 @ $1 28 ; Whale, 55 @ 65 ; Winter Bleached, 
63@72. Wool -Spring, fine, 22£@23; Burry, 12£@16 ; Pulled, 30@40. 
Kail Clips, 18@23; Burry, Hi <</■ 25. London, Jan. 25th.~ Liverpool 
Wheat Market, 12s. 7d. Or 12s. 9d. Club, 12s. lOd. @ 13s. 3d. United 
States Bonds, 106£®105£. Consols, 95. 



Mr. F. ,VliT»r. No. 8 Clements i.nne, London, Is authorized to 

receive subscriptions, advertisements, communications, etc., for this paper, 

Published with this week's issue a Fonr- 
JPage Postscript. 

LATEST ATOMS OF NEWS OF FACT AND THOUGHT. 



THE STOCK MARKET. 
Business at the Boards has dwindled down to almost nothing, and 
the prevailing dullness is severely felt by the brokers, who are not even 
earning current expenses. There is no reason to suppose that this state 
of affairs will continue long; for, with the recent heavy rains, and the as- 
surance of a most bountiful harvest, wc may look for a year of prosperity 
and plenty. The stock business must necessarily participate in the general 
good results. Independent of outside influences, the condition of things 
at the mines are of the most encouraging character; and, despite the con- 
tinued and labored efforts of the leading "bear" organ to decry our most 
valuable properties, holders of the stock continue to receive their regular 
$2 dividends, and ought to feel happy under the circumstances. The 
"Bonanzas" are in good demand at improved quotations, and are the 
mainstay of the whole market. The long looked for cross cutting in 
Ophir has not yet commenced, nor is there any immediate prospect of it. 
Meanwhile, the stock holds firm and in good request. Alta shows a 
slight improvement, under the prospect of a compromise with the Justice 
Company. This will undoubtedly be the outcome of the present complica- 
tions, and by far the most satisfactory mode of settlement. Outside 
stocks are almost entirely neglected, and barely obtain quotation. At the 
close the market was a shade off, under very limited business. 



A Good Bill.— Senator Pierson has introduced a bill that ought to he- 
come law. It provides for a Registrar in each county, who shall cancel 
all old certificates and countersign new ones. The object is to prevent 
over issues of stock. The Registrar is to be paid by fees graduated in the 
several counties. A further provision is needed in the interests of the 
outside stockholder, requiring Brokers to give the number of each certifi- 
cate purchased on customer's account. 

Arizona Items. — Professor Thomas Price left on Saturday last to 
" expert" the famous Vulture gold mine near Wickenburg, in the inter- 
est of a company of San Francisco capitalists. ^— Mr. P. T. Nouguea 
writes that the developments upon the "Silver King North" property, in 
Pinal District, continue with encouraging prospects. 

The silly runs upon the Clay-street and Odd Fellows' Savings Banks 
soon came to an end in a most happy manner. When everybody saw 
that their coin was there, nobody wanted it. We are glad to know that 
these old and trusted institutions, through a period of threatened panic, 
stood as firm as the rock of ages. 

The receipts of revenue from the 1st of April to the 22d of Decem- 
ber were £52,715,118, against £52,502,383 in the corresponding period of 
last year. The expenditure was £53,45)3,658, against £53,313,005 last 
year. The balances in the Banks of England and Ireland on Saturday 
last amounted to £4, 118,701- 

The stock sales of miscellaneous securities, for the week, embrace the 
following from private hands: S. F. Gaslight, 300 shares, 90, ex dividend. 
Spring Valley Water, 100 shares, 92; 200 shares do., 91; 20 shares do., 90. 
First National Gold Bank, 80 shares, 90. Bank of California, 50 shares, 90. 

In proof of the confidence of the English nation, and of that more 
sensitive power, the moneyed men of the nation, in the Government, it 
may be stated that, on the receipt of the news of the action of Ministers, 
Consols rose from 94 £ to 96. 

A report of the Greek Minister of War shows that the Greek army 
numbers 25,326, including 776 officers and 110 under-orfieers. There are 
15,532 infantry, 2,738 light infantry, 1,793 artillery, 807 cavalry, and 

1,042 sappers and min ers. 

The expense of Stanley's African exploration is, in round numbers, 
§115,000. He discovered 15,000,000 heathens, which is about six for five 
cents, or a very reasonable figure for heathens. — iV. F. Herald. 

A New York telegram, of the 24th instant states that the steamer 
JohnBmmtl Ui has sailed with a cargo of warlike stores for Constantinople. 



Printed and PubUahed by the Proprietor, Frederick Marriott, 607 to 615 Merchant Street, San Francisco, California. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Jan. 26. 1878. 



A LAMENT. 

If sweet content and bliss serene 

Could e'er become a mortal's prize, 
Then with Miss Carrie's love, I ween, 

Earth would to me be Paradise. 
But yet, alas, the wish is vain ! 

Who can the doom of mankind parry? 
This perfect joy I ne'er can gain ; 

My brightest, fairest hopes mis-Carrie. 

IS LIFE "WORTH LIVING ? 

The above question was recently asked in one of those new and 
ambitious monthly magazines, which devote themselves apparently to the 
solution of every problem under the sun, and above it. Such, at least, 
was I he title of the paper of which we speak, though, on closer acquaint- 
ance with it, the reader discovered that the object of the writer was to 
prove that life could not possibly be deemed worth having by people en- 
tei't lining certain theological opinions. That is hardly the point we 
should seek to press, nor yet its opposite. Our question is addressed to 
men and women generally, quite irrespective of their opinions, or even of 
the fact whether they hold opinions at all. Nothing is better established, 
than that the variety of creeds with which we are blessed is happily not 
attended by much variety in conduct, and it is probable that the value 
set by people upon this life is wholly independent of their opinions re- 
specting another. Here we are, aud most of us try to make the most of 
it. Having made the best of it, do men come to the conclusion that life 
is worth having, or is it a gift a dispassionate person would rather have 
dispensed with ? 

In one of Pope's best-known lines, it is pointad out, that man never 
is blest at the present moment, but is always expecting to become so. In 
other words, he is always waiting for something that never happens. 
This may be a true description of young people, but we doubt if it be 
true of persons arrived at mid die- life. Men of meridian age do not suffer 
themselves to be duped by visions becoming realities. At forty, a man, ■ 
and even a woman, " knows all about it ;" and though they may not have 
arrived at the conclusion, with regard to life, that there's nothing in it, 
they have thoroughly ascertained that there is nothing more in it. They 
know the be*t ; aud, perhaps, they think that '"bad's the best." At any 
rate, it is difficult for them to feel any enthusiasm for a past that is over, 
for a present that is uncommonly like it, and for a future that will pre- 
sent no new features. The man who shot himself because, as he said, he 
was tired of dressing and undressing, resembles thousands of people in 
every particular but one— they do not shoot themselves. It it obvious 
that he did not think life worth having, and they are of the same opin- 
ion. Only, unlike him, they don't care to give effect to their opinion. On 
the other hand, there are thousands, and tens of thousands of people, 
who, though they may not think life a very valuable privilege, would 
rather have it than not ; and it is an incontrovertible fact that they 
usually manifest a marked repugnance to be deprived of it. Still, people 
may cling to life from habit, without greatly enjoying it, just as wives 
sometimes cling to their husbands, or husbands to tbeir wives, though 
they never have an agreeable moment together. There is such a thing as 
moral vis inertia:, which renders it a painful effort to move, for the pur- 
pose of going elsewhere. Besides, grown-up people act toward life much 
as children behave at a pantomime; tbey object to going away before 
everybody else goes. If we could all die together, possibly there would 
not be much murmuring. But when we cease to live, one goes, and all 
the rest remain behind. Children, no matter how tired, dislike going to 
bed ; and grown-up people, even when utterly weary of life, will turn 
fractious at the mention of the grave. 

Nothing, therefore, in our opiuion, is to be gathered as to the value 
people set on life, from their aversion to part with it. Man is a cantan- 
kerous, inconsequent creature, and his feelings and his conduct often 
bear no relation toward each other. Our own opinion is, that life is well 
worth having, even should it turn out that there is no ground for going 
into raptures over its natural advantages. But. in order to find it worth 
having, people must avail themselves of these natural advantages. The 
ascetic moralists, who render life unendurable, and then declare it to be 
a valley of tears, have themselves to thank for the conclusion. What 
Goethe happily designates harmonious development, and what the Ro- 
mans describe by ne quid niijiis, is indespensable, if life is to have a fair 
chance. In the matter of happiness, as in that of safe financial specula- 
tion, the rule holds good that warns us not to put all our eggs in one 
basket. We believe, that as great a 4i pull" is to be got out of life by 
physical exercise as by any other occupation that can be named. We 
lately heard a man aver that " lawn tennis had weaned him from all 
earthly affections." Inasmuch as he enjoyed lawn-tenuis, he was a for- 
tunate person ; in so far as he based all his happiness on lawn-tennis, he 
was a gambler of the worst description. Even lawn-tennis may come to 
an end. Old age, cramp, rheumatism, or a sprain might rob him of his 
sole source of joy. We regard reading as rather a poor amusement ; yet, 
as it can be had when nothing else can, a man ought to be able to read, at 
a push, and be moderately diverted by doing so. Intellectual activity, 
which is something very different from mere reading, is one of the surest 
means of finding that life is worth having. But even intellectual activity 
may bring a curse along with it, if the object be discovery, and much 
more if the object be personal advancement. Of course, if a man can 
retain his faith in a Cause till the end of his daj's, activity in promoting 
it must be very pleasant. But a man must be rather an ass who does 
not at last discover that a Cause— any Cause — is very faulty, or that it is in 
danger of being superceded by another. What makes muscular games 
so agreeable is, that they are played for their own sake, and for no ulter- 
ior object. Purposeless energy, therefore, is as likely as anything else to 
make life seem worth having. Most people associate purposelessness with 
laziness. But the two things by no means go together. Our business is 
to state facts, not to preach a sermon ; or we might dwell on the delight 
of virtue, philanthropy, and doing good. But we must observe that the 
delight of good springs from the " doing," and not from the "good," and 
that many people are just as delighted doing ill. Again, it is the doing, 
and not the evil, in which tbey delight. The thing is, not to go to sleep, 
but to live vigorously, and variously, without thinking too much of life, 
or of what puts an ena to it ; and then it will be worth having till it is 
over. — Truth. 

Money that bank officers get away with is charged to running expenses. 



Banks. 



NEVADA BANS OF S IN FRANCISCO, 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAX. 

Paid Un Capital 510,000,000, Gold. 

Surplus (¥. S. Bonds) $2,500,000, Gold. 

BIKECTORS: 

Louis KcLane President. | J. C. Flood Vice-President. 

John W. MCackay, "W. S. O'Brien, James G-. Fair. 

Cashier C. T. Christensen. 

Agent at Virginia, Nevada George A. King. 

Issues Commercial and Travelers' Credits, available in any part of the world. 

Slakes Transfers of Money by Telegraph and Cable, and Draws Exchange at cus- 
tomary usances. This Hank bus special facilities for dealing in Bullion. 

EXCHANGE on the Principal Cities throughout the United States, Europe, Japan, 
China and the Eas>t Indies, the Australian Colonies and New Zealand, and on Hon- 
olulu, Hawaii. 

New York Bankers The Baxk of New York, N. E. A. 

Loudon Bankers Messrs. SaiiTU, Payne & Smiths. 

[January 20.] 

THE BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital §5,000,000. 

». O. MIXXS President. | WM. AI/VO»»...Vice-Pres't. 

THOSE AS BROWN Cashier. 

Agents : 

New York, Agency of the Dank of Calfomia ; Boston, Trcmont National Bank 
Chicago, Union National Bank ; St. Louis, Boatman's Saving Bank ; New Zealand, 
the Bank of New Zealand ; London, China, Japan, India and Australia, the Oriental 
Bank Corporation. 

The Bank has Agencies at Virginia City and Gold Hill, and Correspondents in all 
the principal Mining Districts and Interior Towns of the Pacific Coast. 

Letters of Credit issued, available in all parts of the world. Draw direct on Lon- 
don, Dublin, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, Hamburg, Frankfort-on-the-Main, Antwerp, 
Amsterdam, St. Petersburgh, Copenhagen, Stockholm, Christiana, Locarno, Mel- 
bourne, Sydney, Auckland, Hongkong, Shanghai, Yokohama. Nov. 4. 

BANE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Incorporated by Boyal Charter. —Capital jsnid up. $],SOO,- 
000, with power to increase to $10,000,000. Southeast corner California and San- 
some streets. Head Office— 5 East India Avenue, London. Branches— Portland, Or- 
egon; Victoria- and Cariboo, British Columbia. 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened subject to Check 
and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted available in all parts of 
the world. Approved Bills discounted and advances made on good collateral security. 
Draws direct at current rates upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents 
as follows : 

New York, Chicago and Canada— Bank of Montreal *• Liverpool — North and South 
Wales Bank ; Scotland— British Linen Company ; Ireland— Bank of Ireland ; Mex- 
ico and South America— London Bank of Mexico and South America; China and 
Japan -Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China, and Oriental Bank ; Australia 
and New Zealand -Bank of Australasia, Commercial Banking Company of Sydney, 
and English, Scottish and Australian Chartered Bank. 

Dec. 0. W. H. TILLING HAST, Manager. 

TEE FIKST NATIONAL GOLD BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Paid up Capital $2,000,000, Gold. President, R. C. Wool- 
worth ; Vice-President, D. CaUaghan ; Cashier, E. D. Morgan. 

Directors :— R. C. Woolwortb, D. CaUaghan, C. G. Hooker, C. Adolph Low, Peter 
Donahue, D. D. Cotton, Edward Martin, James Moffitt, N. Van Bergen. 

CoRRKsroxoEXTS— London : Baring Bros. & Co. ; Chartered Mercantile Bank of In- 
dia, London and China. Dublin : Provincial Bank of Ireland. Hamburg: Hesse, 
Neuman&Co. Paris: Hottinguerfc Co. New York: National Bank of Commerce. Bos- 
ton : Blackstone National Bank. Chicago : First National Bank. This Bank is pre- 
pared to transact a general Banking business. Deposits in Gold, Silver and Currency 
received subject to check or on special deposit. Exchange for sale on the principal 
cities of the United States, Great Britain, Ireland and the Continent. Commercial 
Credits issued available in Europe, Chii.a and Japan. Collections attended to and 
prompt returns made at the lowest market rates of Exchange. Jan. 19. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK (LIMITED). 

(Capital, §5,0CG,000,off irhicn §3,000,000 is tally paid up as 
j present capital. Reserve Fund, ©450,000. San Francisco Office, 42-t Califor- 
nia street ; London Office, 22 Old Broad street. Manager, ARTHUR, SCRIVENER ; 
Assistant Manager, CAMILO MARTIN; Cashier, WILLIAM STEEL. London 
Bankers, Bank of England and London Joint Stock Bank ; New York, Drexel, 
Morgan & Co. ; Boston, Third National Bank. This Bank is prepared to transact 
all kinds of General Banking and Exchange Business in London and San Francisco, 
and between said cities and all parts of the world. Jan. ly. 

THE ANGL0-CALEEORNIAN BANK (LIMITED). 

4£%Q California street, San Francisco.— London Office, 3 
.-*.-. -c^ Angel Court ; New York Agents, J. W. Keligman & Co. , 21 Broad street. 
Authorized Capital Stock, $G,OOi>,000. Will receive Deposits, open Accounts, make 
Collections, buy and sell Exchange and Bullion, loan Money, and issue Letters of 
Credit available throughout the world. FRED. F. LOW, ) ,, 

IGN. STE1NHART, j" * iuna =' er S- 
P. N. LILIENTHAL, Cashier. Oct 4. 



NOW READY! 
HINTOK'S NEW MAP OF ARIZONA. 

Invaluable for tite traveler, prospector and miner. Con- 
tains all the latest miuing districts, locations, U. S. Surveys, etc. Price lower 

than other maps. 

Colored, on rollers $2 50. | Do. for pocket, in covers $1 50. 

NEARLY READY, 
IS anion's lEnuri-JSook of Arizona! 

Four hundred pages, three new maps, seventy illustrations. Orders received by 
the publishers. PAYOT, UPHAM &, CO., San Francisco, 

Jan. 12. AMERICAN NEWS CO., New York. 



Da* Z. Yost.] 



F 



[E. F. Child, Member S. F. Stock Exchange. 
CHILD & YOST, STOCKBROKERS, 

No. 332 Montgomery St. [Jan. 12. 

MORRIS SPEYER, 
ire and Marine Insurance Agent, 307 California street. 

Dwelling, 507 Post street. January l, 1878. Jan. 12. 



Jan. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



TO A COUSIN. 
I'll pnuV jrou with tV 

■ v«ai 



■ 



1 

(And tlii 1 -i . vriUiou 

I 



iowingt8dium; 

■ 

In,' in. ilium. 

Ill say vmirf-.-Um 1 too oft, 

" ,l ' 1 il you, of all, are my particular 

brighter than the sun, (I\l rutin- r say i< in your soft 
mod 

y ; —Puck: 

THE CZAR AT HOME. 
The Emperor of Russia arrived ;»t St Petersburg, and was enthusi- 

. . unp.mieil hy P 

[ at thi' railway station liy the Imperial family, the 
. the Km pi re and the Senate, and the principal 

ition to 
the pal ■■-, lined by an imm i i if pe i 

n moai euthusiaatic greeting. Referring to the 
war, the Emperor U r?porte ud: "The thing must be 

i." This oracular utterance is, we are told, v iriously inter- 
In reply to a deputation from the municipality of St Peters- 
_ him "ii hi' return, the Cur said: "I thank yon, 
For your sympathy. I am very happy to find myself with 
ly alter the • wuicd 1 bad during the last 

i. my children before Plevn >. We have done much, but 
- much f'»r us to do, May ii"l help us to carry out to the 
- holy undertaking! " On the occasion of the Alexander ffite, 
there waa ■ parade in the grounds of the Winter Palace. The Emperor 
h t-> the faroo tng bis conviction that, in case the 

if the war should nee wsitate the participation of the broopB sta- 
in and around St P bey would fulfil] their duty nonor- 
nd gloriously. After divine service the Bmperorreceived delegates 
of the Russian ami foreign commercial community, and big Majesty, a 
i - La hope of a happy termination of the present 
war. A few days afterward, the Emperor held a review of the 
trict of St Petersburg on the Bquare before the Imperial 
Winter I troope consisted of twenty-six battalions of infantry, 
twenty-five squadrons of cavalry, and forty-two pieces of artillery. His 
in good health, and th^- parade, being favored by fine 
: bo have passed off most brilliantly. An address of tie- 
I i the Czar, presented by the St. Petersburg nobility, on the occa- 
sion ol his return to the capital, has been published. It expresses the 
wish that God may bestow His blessing Upon the Emperor, to enable him 
isly to terminate the present war. The Emperor, in receiving the 
, expressed his sincere thanks for the good wishes it contained. A 
letter in the PolUis mdenz says that the conviction at Bu- 
' is that the Czar will again return to the army after the Greek 
new year. 

One of the principal reasons which caused the Emperor to journey 
with all Bpeod to hi? capital after the fall of Plevna, was that he might 
be able to preside in person at the ceremonial commemorating the centen- 
ary - f the birth of his illustrious ancestor, Alexander I. 

The Emperor entered the cathedral, followed in single file by the male 
members of the Imperial family now in St. Petersburg, and strode up 
the i.-de with a truly noble port. He wore a splendid hussar dress, with 
fur pelisse dangling from the shoulder, and acknowledged with Imperial 
dignity the obeisances paid him by ail. The Metropolitan conducted in 
person the solemn funeral service before the tomb of Alexander, the Em- 
peror standing or kneeling in the open space in front of the Metropolitan, 
with his family, the Court, and his officers behind him. The strains of 
the solemn requiem rose from the serried tiers of the choir. White- 
bearded priests standing around the tombs of the dead Emperors were 
visible through the foliage of the grove of exotic shrubs, in which the 
marble monuments were embowered. As the pealing strains of the an- 
them wailed through the cathedral, the Emperor took from one of his 
Ministers a commemorative medal struck for the occasion, and, approach- 
ing the tomb of Alexander, laid the medal upon it, among the floral 
wreaths and crosses which flushed the pale marble with their colors. At 
this moment, all present knelt, with a lighted taper in every hand, and as 
the requiem hushed there rose the sonorous accents of the Metropolitan 
pronouncing the benediction. The Emperor visited in succession the tomb 
of each member of his race, bending and kissing the marble. He lingered 
a moment over the tomb of his first-born, the late Czarewitch, on wdiich 
loving hands keep the flowers perpetually fresh ; and, with final, stately 
bows to the illustrious congregation, quitted the cathedral at noon. 

INDIAN TEA. 

Indian tea was successfully introduced to the public at the Cattle 
Show, in the Agricultural Hall, London, a few weeks ago. The Indian 
Tea Agency, of 2 Jermyn street, opened a room within the building, 
which afforded visitors an opportunity of judging the merits of Indian 
teas. A remarkably good-looking Hindoo, in full Oriental costume, was 
in attendance. A full service of every kind of Indian tea was supplied 
to all comers. The first of the guests were the Duke and Duchess of 
Manchester, and the last Lord Chesham, Vice-President of the Smith- 
field Club. Intermediately a party of upward of 200 was entertained, in- 
cluding most of the judges, members of the committees of the Club, the 
Lady Mayoress and her daughters. The satisfaction expressed with the 
quality of the tea was perfectly unanimous. The Agency had also a stall 
in the bazaar, gorgeously fitted up with Oriental draperies and decora- 
tions, where the teas were sold. The British public is not easily moved 
in favor of any Dew article of consumption, but in the matter of tea every 
man judges for himself, and we are sure that not long hence, instead of 
drinking tea which at present owes its chief strength and flavor to the 
Indian product mixed with China leaf, they will lake lucre generally to 

thi' use of the pure unadulterated article from iudia, with advantage to 
their palate ami purse.- -Overland Mail. 



Savings and Loan. 



SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 
019 Clay Strcot- 

A i a me* tins of Hip Board or Directors, held thin day, a 
■ 
"" »ll rle| 

anti after thi j w CARMA1S I 

1878. 

THE GESHAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

Deataone Spar an<Mi«t!ibn-uk, No 5S6 Calirornlaatreot,fian 
■ "■ :■■■ i i QOTTIG Board oi D PVi d 

. Chai Kohler, Dan, Meyer, Edw Kru H I ■ ■■ i 

Q, n. i- 81 Secretary, GEO. LETTE : Attornoy, JOITO R. 

i,i, -i 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK —GUARANTEE CAPITAL, $300,0%0. 

O Hirers: President, John Parrots : Vice-President, Jerome 
Lincoln ; Secretary, w s. Jones ; Attorney, Bidnej \ Smith. Loans made on 

Real Estate and other Approved Securities. Otllcc : No. 216 Siinmnne street, San 

Francisco. Oct. 14. 

MASONIC SAVINGS AND LOAN BANK, 

No. « l*ost street, Masonic Temple, Sun Frauelaeo, Cal.«- 
Mone;s received on Term sad Ordinary Deposits; dividends paid Beml- 
annuallj ; loans made on approved security. 

Sept. 1. H. T. GRAVES, Secretary. 

FRENCH SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 
Bnsh street, above Kearny, G. Mahe, Director. Loans 

made on real estate and other collateral suiuritiesat current rates of 



411 



AGENT FOR DUPONT'S GUNPOWDER, 
Winchester Repaating Arms and Ammunition, Lake Superior and Pa- 
cific Safety Fuss. 
Dn pout's Superior mining and Blasting Powder, manufac- 
tured expressly for California; Cannon, Musket and Sporting Powder ; the 
Led Diamond Grain and Eagle Duck, No. 's 1, 2 and :s ; Eagle Rifle, impont's 
Fy, FFy and FFpg, in kegs, hail kegs, quarter kegs mid canisters of A pound and 1 
pound. Winchester's [Henry's Improved) Repeating Rifles, Rifled Muskets, Carbines 
and Fixed Ammunition. Lake Superior and I'aeiGe Safety Fuse— in suitable pack- 
ages for the trade, and warranteu not to fail. 

JOHN SKINKEIt, Agent far the Pacifle Coast, 
Jan. 12. 115 Pine street, San Francisco. 

ASHTON'S LIVERPOOL SALT. 

This celebrated) brand of Salt has been in constant use for 
more than half a century in the Eastern States, where for dairy purposes it 
commands double the price of any uthcr brand ol Liverpool Salt, The undersigned 
ure sole agents here, and offer it to the trade. WILLIAMS, BLANCHARD & CO., 
■bin r>. 218 California street. 

FRANK KENNEDY^ 

Law Office, 604 Merchant Street. --Probate, Divorce, Bank- 
ruptcy, and other cases attended to. Rents, and all other demands, collected, 
ifad tenants ousted. Charge taken of real estate for residents, or absentees. Charges 
very reasonable. Jan. 12. 

COKE CHEAPEST FUEL. 

Reduction in Price : Wholesale Price, 50 cents per barrel ; 
Retail Price, GO cents per barrel, at the works of the SAN FRANCISCO GAS- 
LIGHT COMPANY, Howard and First streets, and foot of Second st. Jan. 12. 



§400,000 TO LOAN 

On City and Country Real Estate. #3.>0,000 to loan on Gas, 
Water, Bank, Railroad and other securities. Mercantile Paper discounted and 
money loaned upon all kinds of collateral security. 
August IS. JOHN T. LITTLE, 412 Montgomery street. 

QUICKSILVER. 
or sale---In lots to suit, by Thomas Bell, No. 305 San some 

street, over Bank of California. Nov. 16. 



F 



LEE DARNEAL CRAIG, 
uccessor to Frank V. Scudder, Notary Public and Commis- 
sioner of Deeds, oil Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal. August 4 



s 



S10 TO $25 A DAY 

Sure made by Agents selling* our Chromos, Crayons, and 
T toward. Motto, Scripture Text, Transparent, Picture and Chromo Cards. 100 
samples, worth $4, sent postpaid for 76 cents. Illustrated catalogue free. J. H. 
BUFFORD'S SONS, Boston. Established 1830. August 18. 

J. C. JOHNSON & CO , 
arucss and Saddlery or every description. 12 and IS Pine 

street, San Francisco. Dec. 15. 



H 



L. G. PARTRIDGE, 
4 ttorney at Law, No. 6 Montgomery Avenue, corner Mont- 



_XjL gomery (third floor), San Francisco. 



Jan. 5. 



A. M. GILMAN, 

Importer and Wholesale Liquor Dealer, SOS California 
street, offers for sale Fine Old Bourbon and Rye Whiskies, Brandies, vintage of 
1820 and 1830, Old Port and Sherry Wines, Still and Sparkling Wines, etc. Agent for the 
Celebrated CACHET BLANC CHAMPAGNE. Sole Agent for MILLS' STo.M \cil 
BITTKRS. March 4. 

ORLEANS HOTEL. 

This Hotel having changed its Management, is now under 
the charge of the undersigned, formerly of the Auzerais Bouse, San Jose, and 
having been thoroughly refurnished throughout, is now Bret-class in all ii> appoint- 
ments. The patronage of the public is respectfully solicited. 
Sacramento, September 0, 1877. (Sept. 28.] J- M. STAPLES. 

D. F. HCTCHINGfi. 



J. Sanderson. 



M. DOKHB. 
PH03NIX OIL WORKS. 

Established IS.IO.— Hutehings A- Co., Oil and Commission 
Merchants, Manufacturers and Dealers in Sperm, Whale, Lard, Machinerj and 
Illuminating Oils. 617 Front street, San Jan, B. 



PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR. WILLIAM D00LAN, 

Office, No. 12 Nevada Block. [Dec. 8. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Jan. 26, 1878. 



Theatrical, Etc. 



California Theater. — Mr. Hill's reputation as a manager, of foresight 
and energy, has received neve strength hy the emphatic success of the 
Trip to the Moon, produced on Monday last, and following, as it does, 
upon the heels of the more than Buccessful Bhirk Crook. In spite of the 
excessively disagreeable weather of the week, the audiences to witness the 
present operatic, burlesque, extravaganza, or whatever may be its exact 
designation, have been crowded ones. The Trip to the Moon has not been 
a fortunate production elsewhere. It failtd in Paris, London, and New 
York, and its unmistakable success here is due almost entirely to the in- 
dividual "go" and humor infused into their parts by the different mem- 
bers of the company, and to its superb scenery and other accessories. The 
text is extremely thin, and the local and other " gags'' so liberally intro- 
duced by the performers, are absolutely necessary to make it tolerable. 
The music, except in three or four airs, does little credit to Offenbach's 
genius, but is rendered all through with a spirit and thoroughness that 
earflfes it off with eclat. As " Prince Caprice," Miss Alice Harrison made 
the 1 it of the piece, and literally " carried " the performance— to use an 
English technicality — all through. This vivacious "pocket edition of 
Venus," appeared in three dresses, all of tbem marvels of good taste, and 
exhibiting her symmetrically petite figure to admirable advantage. Both 
her acting and singing gave renewed evidence of this clever young actres- 
ses immediate adaptability to leading opera bouffe roles. Her aria in the 
first act. her duet with the Princess, and a waltz song later in the piece, 
all received enthusiastic applause. The most taking air, however, is the 
trio between Miss Harrison, Messrs. Bishop and Keene, ending with an 
exceedingly funny dance, in which the Can Can flavor is introduced just 
sufficiently to give it piquancy. Mr. Keene was exceedingly funny as 
" Microscope," and exhibited his admitted great versatility in a new direc- 
tion. It is possible, however, for the dignified charger, suddenly relieved 
from the restraints of the stable, to overdo his frolics in the unaccustomed 
freedom of the pastures. Mr. K's assumption of sea-sickness in the flying 
ship," was pronounced to a degree that rather marred the enjoyment of 
that most requisite effect, in which the mere suggestion of anything so 
unetherial as nausea, would be more appropriate. Mr. Bishop made a 
capital "King Pin," and was exceedingly funny, especially in his cos- 
tumes. Miss Grace Plaisted is a petite little girl of some promise, though 
with rather a hard style both in manner and voice, which last she used 
much too ambitiously at present. Mr. Mesteyer was both imposing and 
excessively funny as "King Cosmos," and, as usual, was (put e at home 
in burlesque. Messrs. Harrison, Wilson and Long, had all small parts, 
of which they made the most, the first named introducing some very 
clever local gags and Chinese lingo. Miss Belle Chapman's part required 
her to do nothing more ardous than to look pretty, which she did with her 
usual success. Of the stage, setting scenery, and general mounting, we 
have nothing but praise. Th-e Deluge is the next attraction underlined. 
It will be produced week after next, provided the public have seen enough 
of the present spectacle by that time, which is somewhat a matter of 
doubt. 

Our musical season may be said to have been fairly inaugurated last 
Wednesday afternoon by the first grand orchestral matinee of Mr. Her- 
old. These concerts are so important a feature of our advance in art as 
a community, that they demand a greater share of attention than we usu- 
ally bestow on such matters. The orchestra this year has been largely 
increased, and is much more carefully selected than last season's. The 
scope, too, of the director has been greatly increased, as was evidenced by the 
presentation of that almost unknown work of Goldbeck's, the overture to 
Sakuntala, on the first programme of the series. The present organiza- 
tion of Herold's orchestra includes eight first and eight second violins, 
five violas, five cellos and four bases in the strings, four trumpets, three 
horns, four clarionets, three flutes, two oboes, two drums, besides bas- 
soons and tromboues, numbering in all fifty-two performers, carefully 
chosen from the most skilled musicians in the city. The new features 
were: The fourth symphony of Beethoven, in B flat major; the over- 
ture of Sakuntala, above alluded to, and a cradle song of Hauser's for 
strings. The minor numbers embraced a horn solo for Mr. Schlotte, than 
which we have heard better at his hands; the march, " Durch Wald und 
Flur" and the "Flambeaux." The cradle song, of course, received an 
encore — a sweet, dreamy theme, whicli meets with more instant apprecia- 
tion at the hands of a general audience than more difficult and classical 
works; but the gem of the afternoon was the " Sakuntala " overture, 
which will not only bear repetition, but as a matter of duty should be 
included in at least one more programme of this series. If we have a 
fault to find, it is not with the concert, but with the attendance. There 
is not a family in San Francisco where children are studying music which 
can afford to miss this great opportunity for imbuing them with a love of 
true and good music. For one young lady that plays the works of legit- 
imate authors, or even listens to them patiently, there are thousands who 
splutter through the wretched drivel which publishers dignify with the 
name of popular airs. Art of every kind has to be cultivated, and unless 
every opportunity to hear high art in music is embraced, the deplorable 
state of things now existing musically is bound to continue. At the next 
concert on Wednesday, we are promised Haydn's symphony in G- major, 
Mozart's concerto in E flat for two pianos and orchestra, besides Schu 
bert's " Kosamunde " overture, and our old favorite, " Traiiinerei," by 
Schumann. 

Pacific Hall. — A concert given at Pacific Hall, on the 22d inst., by 
Master Mitchell Banner, the child violinist, proved quite a success, finan- 
cially a- well as musically. The playing of the above infantile Paganini 
was remarkable, not so much for fine execution, which cannot be sus- 
pected from one so young, but for the wonderful sympathetic sweetness 
and purity of tone which he elicits. The vocal part of the programme 
was evidently selected with great care and taste. Miss Leonore Simons 
sang the " Fabbri Waltz," and being most enthusiastically encored, re- 
sponded with a brindit-i from Lucretia Borgia, in which her fine, rich tones 
were heard to full advantage. Her duet with Mr. Julius Stein was finely 
rendered, and contributed greatly to the success of the evening. The ren- 
dition of the rest of the programme was mediocre, the piano playing of 
Mr. Hoffman, the singing of San ford Bennett and of Miss Tucholsky but 
serving to tamely fill out the programme, a kind of process too much in- 
dulged in of late by our concert givers, and which is condemned by the 
musical public, who quietly refrain from attending concerts where the 
beauty of a fine voice is marred by the vocal efforts of would-be " profes- 
sional amateurs." 



Complimentary Berr.fit to Manager Maguire. — It is with real 
pleasure that the News Letter calls attention to the benefit tendered to 
Manager Maguire by the Union Square Theater Company, to take place 
at Baldwin's, Monday evening, the 28th instant. That the amusement- 
loving public of our city will make this an occasion for demonstrating 
their appreciation of the beneficiary, we cannot for a moment question, 
and we heartily indorse the occasion as one that should take upon itself 
the character of an ovation. Thomas Maguire is the prince of managers. 
Let him have a princely gathering, such a one as is justly his due. 

Tne popular concerts on Sunday evenings at the Grand Opera 
House are destined to become one of the most delightful and attractive 
places of amusement in the city. They will, we predict, become a per- 
manent institution. In addition to the grand orchestra, the services of 
Mr. Hugo Mansfeldt, pianist; Mr. John Seveniers, solo cornet, and the 
Madrigal Boys have been secured. The performance is ended generally 
about quarter or half past 10, and we are confident that nowhere can two 
or three hours be passed more pleasantly than at these popular concerts. 

The Musical Soiree given by Professor G. C. Knnbfel, of Chicago, at 
St. -John's Presbyterian Church, on Tuesday evening, proved quite an 
ovation, notwithstanding - the rain. In addition to Dr. Scott's congrega- 
tion, free invitations were widely distributed, and the church was well 
filled by the elite of the city. Mrs. Marriner and Miss Belle Thomas 
each sang solos, and were enthusiastically encored, as were Mr. Mayers- 
Professor Gee and Professor Heyman. The selections were good and the 
music superb. 

Emerson's Opera House.— The Adah Richmond Opera Troupe pro- 
duced %ad Dickey here on Monday night. Without any very special 
features to commend it. this piece may be said to rank next to Kenihvoi th, 
as regards its opportunities for the introducing of the peculiar burlesque 
business of this organization. Miss Lewis has proved a decided acquisi- 
tion, and has already established herself as a prime favorite. 

Baldwin's. — The final week of the Union Square Company has been 
taken up with a repetition of Led Astray, Pink Dominoes., Genera Cross, 
and other plays of its reportoirc, already recently criticised in this column. 
"We wish these admirable artists bon voyage, and a speedy return to us. 

Grand Opera House. — The Regiment of Champagne has continued its 
not very triumphal march here during the present week. 

Krug Champagne.— Private Cuvee, in quarts and pints; Shield — 
Krug — in quarts and pints ; Premiere Qualite, in quarts and pints. For 
sale Ivy Hellman Bros. & Co., corner Front and Jackson. 

EMERSON'S OPERA EOUSE. 

Wm. Emerson, Manager. --Positively the &ast Week of the 
ADAH RICHMOND OPERETTA BOUFFE and BURLESQUE COMPANY. 
The Queen of 'American Burlesque, MISS ADAH RICHMOND, as " Henry, Earl of 
RICHMOND." First time in this city of BAD DICKEY (the prreat New York sensa- 
tion), a whinisic.il Musical Burlesque, in two acts, on RICHARD THE THIRD. MR. 
MOSES W. FISKE in his original character of DUKE OF GLOSTER. Grand Matinee 
this (Saturday! Afternoon. Sunday, January 27th, Grand Complimentary .Benefit to 
MISS ADAH RICHMOND, and positively her last appearance in San Francisco, upon 
which occasion the Musical Extravaganza entitled GOLDEN BUTTERFLY will be 
produced. A host of volunteers, consisting: of the best Variety Talent of San Fran- 
cisco, will appear in conjunction with the Richmond Burlesque Troupe on this 
occasion. Jan. 26. 

CALIFORNIA THEATER. 

Bnsh Street, above Hearny.-Johu Mc€ulloti*?h. Proprietor 
and Manager : Barton Hill. Acting Manager. Another Decided Success ! 
Offenbach's Spectacular Opera Bouffe, entitled A TRIP TO THE MOON, every eve- 
ning until further notice. New Ballets by the Kiralfy Troupe. A Full and Well 
Trained Chorus. Voegtlin's Magnificent Scenes. Gorgeous Costumes from Paris. 
DEROSA, PALLADlNO, THE CLM SISTERS, VAIDfS SISTERS, Alice Harrison, 
Grade Plaisted, Bishop, Keene, Mestayer, and a Full Dramatic Cast. "The scenery 
was superb." — Bulletin. " As near perfection as can be imagined." — Mail. Matinee 
this (Saturday) Afternoon, Monday, February 4th— First Appearance of S1GNOR 
EDUARDO MAJERONI. Jan. 2(i. 

BUS1 STREET THEATER. 

Charles E. Locke, Lessee ; Frank J aim lor. Acting Manager. 
Saturday Evening, January 26th, and every evening, including Sunday. Matinee 
Saturday, February 2d. The Management begs to announce the reopening of this 
renovated, repainted, newly carpeted, and with entirely new scenery hy 
with America's Most Pl«asing Nuveilv, MADAME RENTZ'S ORIGINAL FE- 



Theater, 

Graham 



MALE MINSTRELS, and MABEL SANTLEY'S LONDON BURLESQUE TROUPE, 
augmented by a superior corps cf Twenty-five Special Artists. PRICES AS USUAL. 
For full particulars and list of artists see small bills. Reserved Seats secured three 
days in advance at the Box Office. Jan. 20. 

GRAND OPERA HOUSF, 

Mission Street, between Third ami Fourth. --M. A. Ken- 
nedy, Acting Manager. This (Saturday) Evening, Jan. 26th, Last Week of 
the Grand Military Play, THE REGIMENT OF CHAMPAGNE, with its Exciting Bat- 
tle Scenes. The Strongest Play of the Season. This Afternoon— Last Matinee of the 
REGIMENT OF CHAMPAGNE. Sunday Evening, Jan. 27th, Second Grand Popular 
Concert. Fifty and Twenty-five Cents Admission. Jan. 20. 

BALDWIN'S THEATER. ~~' 

Thomas Maguire, Manager. — Positively Last Xi slits of 
CHARLES R. THORNE, JR , and the Union Square Theater Company. This 
(Saturday) Evening, and Last Saturday Matinee, by special request, the beautiful 

French play, THE MARBLE HEART. Sunday Evening, last time of the powerful 
drama, THE TWO ORPHANS. Monday Evening, Jan. 28th, Complimentary Benefit 
tendered to THOMAS MAGUIRE by the Union Square Theater Company. Positively 
Last Performance ,j aTi _ 26. 

SfTIMtUT CATTLNTETrE MUSICAL RECITALS. 

Second Subscription Series— Mercantile Library Mail, com- 
mencing FRIDAY, February 1st. MISS ALICE SCHMIDT. Pianoforte; MR 
LOUIS SCHMIDT, JR , and MR. CLIFFORD SCHMIDT, Violins: MR LOUIS 
SCHMIDT, Viola; and MR. ERNST SCHMIDT, Violoncello. Assisted by MRS. 
HENRY NORTON, Soprano. Subscription List open at Gray's Music Store. Sub- 
scription, i*A, entitling subscriber to a Reserved Seat for the series of four concerts. 
Box Office open for reservation of seats on the morning of the Concert. Jan. 26. 

R. HEROLD'S SECOND ORCHESTRAL MATINEE 

Will take place at the Metropolitan Temple. Fifth street, 
near Market, on WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON, JanuarySOth, at 3 o'clock p.m. 
Box Sheet will open on TUESDAY and WEDNESDAY, January 29th and 30th, at 
Gray's Music Store, 105 Kearny street. CHARLES SCHUTZ, 

Jan. 26. Business Manager. 



Jan. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



BROKE 



' 









friend, 

Halm n»w And homeless, 
in n, 

i for rvnt, 
« n ; 
t in paw n, my friend, 
Ami eke my Sumliiy 

d .1 fracture 
tipper of my 1 

in thin philosophy 
Than I ■!■! 

m held for debt 
jdongolufcn hand 



BALLAD. 

That r 

friend, 
It'tt they've tli«' power of Bl 

. 

I think I also might 
There's i 'harles ( 'iMrkcr's ]:i! 

A dollar earn each day ; 

Shall 1 in v shovel don, and hie 

To Washerwoman*! Bay, 

To Washerwoman's Bay, my friend? 

No doubt I inL'lit do 

Bat first I'll try to make a i 

By woes done into verse. 

tnach that I would willingly 

•red in my case 
An empty pocket in my clothes 



By shrewd Mongolian hand, my ts sadly out of | 

[a sadly out of place, my friend, 



friend, 
For a rery paltry sum ; 
lint dimes are dollars now to me, 
And even they don't 



And ail the world MTins \ aln 

To one without 

In the season of the rain. v.. H. J. 



ART JOTTINGS. 



Our neighbors in Portland, Oregon, have been regaled the past season 
with a goodly Quantity of pictures, Mr. Gale, whose collection received 

such a Mow at the hands of the San Francisco press, succeeded iii getting 
away with about five thousand dollars, which lie received in exchange for 

the '/""»■ t" art Next, came a man with a cargo of chromos. He is said 
to have .sold in the neighborhood of $4,000 worth of his wares. Then came 
the drummer for a Grm of port rait manufacturers, whose headquarters are in 
this city. He sold three thousand dollars in portraits. And last, but not 
least, Mr. K Iward Hill, of 1 1 ill Bros., art dealers, on Post street, offered 
at private sale, and then at auction, a lot of his father's (Mr. Tims. Hill's) 
pictures. The Portlanders failed to appreciate the offering, just as our 
art collectors did, for it was the same lot put up at auction in the Art 
tion Gallery last season, and later on offered at private sale in the 
Mechanics' Institute Exhibition. According to the Portland papers, but 
jour pictures were sold, and they brought infinitesimal prices, iu com- 
parison to the value placed upon them by the artist. 

it not seem strange that an artist, who has made sales of a goodlv 
number of paintings to our citizens at excellent prices, should thus hawk 
Ins works over the country, and sell them for what they will bring on the 
i block. No wonder buyers are shy of local art when a painting — 
for which six hundred dollars is demanded, and for similar works, time 
and again, from five to six hundred dollars has been received — is sold in a 
neighboring city for one hundred and thirty dollars, including a frame, 
which must have cost not less than iifty dollars. 

Mr. Arthur Nahl, one of our most able and conscientious workers in 

fiortraiture, has just completed an excellent portrait, in crayon, of the 
ate Senator, Nathan Porter. It is exquisitely finished, as is all his 
work, and IB withal a perfect likeness of the man. The picture can be 
seen iii a window at the corner of Montgomery and Bush streets. 

Now that we have seen the masterpieces of Neal and Moore, and are 
so soon to have the new work of Toby Rosenthal, it seems in order to 
mention another of California's gifted sons Edward Butler, who left here for 
Europe in the ship Three Brothers, on the 17th of March, 1877. He seems 
to have improved his time on the long voyage, for he was offered one 
thousand dollars for the sketches he made and the manuscript of his 
diary, together with a royalty of one dollar per volume on all books sold 
above one thousand. 

Upon his arrival in Paris he entered Gerome's School as No. 60 in the 
class. At latest advices he had reached No. b", with a good prospect of 
going to the head. This is truly a remarkable record, and his many 
friends here may look for something good from his easel at no distant day. 
Young Butler possesses the same patience and perseverance which has 
done so-much for Rosenthal. It requires persistent application, as well 
as talent, to enable an artist to reach eminence in his profession nowa- 
days. Eew, except those who have tried it, realize what it is to labor 
years upon one canvas. 

Extreme dullness prevails in art circles, but the outlook for a good market 
son improves as the season advances, and it is hoped that those who fol- 
low art as a profession will have an easier time of it the coming year 
than they have during the one just closed. 



Reports from various sections of Tulare county give flattering pros- 
pects for a large yield of grain this year. In the Mussel Slough District, 
the ground is said to be in excellent condition — never better — and those 
who are so fortunate as to own farms there, congratulate themselves on 
the certainty of an abundant harvest. In that section land is worth from 
twenty-five to thirty dollars per acre, and there is scarcely any to be had 
at that price. Possessing, as it does, all the advantages of irrigation, a 
dry season has but few terrors for the farmer, for even during such as last 
season, one of the dryest ever known, two crops were secured, and stock 
did not suffer by want of pasturage. Of course the distance from the 
market of San Francisco, and the high rates of transportation of produce 
by rail, acts disadvantageous^ for those who are so far removed from the 
city. Time, however, will remedy this evil, and those who have been far 
seeing enough to invest their money in a locality so favored, will always 
receive an ample return for their outlay. It has lately been asserted by 
experts who have examined this section, that there is no more valuable 
agricultural property in the State than the Mussel Slough District of 
Tulare county. 

"Whenever the police catch a Chinaman stealing potatoes they inva- 
riably compel him to hump the tubers himself up to the City Prison, to be 
usc\ as evidence against him. Now if this is not making a man crimi- 
nate himself, what is? Besides Chinamen don't think it a sin to steal 
potatoes, as they understand that in America people have their pommes 
de ten'e free. 



SIGNAL SERVICE METE0R0L03ICAL REPORT. WEEK 
ENDING JAN. 24, 1878. SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



W'jfn xt nmt I .«i if. pj I'.n mni'trr. 



Frl. 18. 



67 
N 

96 

SK. 
113 

Rainy, 

.jra 



Sat. 19. 






Sun 20 



* 



Hon. 81 



■ 



Tue. 22 I Wed23 I Thr24 



80.18 

I :si).u7 



Maximum ami Minimum Ttnrmnmrtt r. 

I 57 I 01 I hi I 61 
61 ,v> .■' ..;: | 68 

Xean Daily Humidity, 

8J | Si | 7i> | 77 | 7(f 

I'r, railing Wind, 

N. | NT.. | SK. j SK. | S\V. 

Wind— Mites Traveled. 

146 | 1 >i | 93 | 848 I 233 

Seals of Weather. 

Rainy, I Cloudy, j 01 k. | Rainy. | Pair. 

Rainfall in Twenty-four flours. 
.10 | | .IS i 1.16 | 



Jit. 71 



67 



| 82 

[ SE. 

| 190 

| Rainy. 

| 1.63 
Total Rain During Season beatnntnff July 1, 1877. .13.00 inches. 



SANITARY NOTES. 

One hundred and one deaths occurred tins week-, as compared with 

9S last, and 140 for the corresponding week last year. There were 12 deaths 

of Chinese ami 1 of white from unknown causes. Thirty-six were under 5 

years, 55 between 20 and 60 years, and only '■'< above ii0. The mortality 
from typhoid fever is decreasing; there were 3 deaths this week, as 
against last. Diphtheria lias increased from 5 to 11 deaths in the week. 
There were 2 deaths from measles, 1 from erysipelas, 2 from cholera, 1 
from whooping cough. There were only 9 deaths from consumption, and 
4 from pneumonia. Bronchitis was three times fatal. Inflammation of 
the kidneys was unusually fatal ; 3 persons died of it. There were 5 
deaths from heart disease. There were 2 accidental deaths and 3 suicides. 
No case of small-pox has been reported this week. Although the mortal- 
ity is high, it is impossible to doubt the good effected by the rain. With 
the cold, dry winds, pneumonia and consumption have decreased. Many 
sewers have been effectually flushed, and even those which are full have 
had their contents diluted. The deaths from typhoid fever may be ex- 
pected soon to disappear from the returns. Catarrh and bronchitis are 
very prevalent. 

Doyle's sale of bric-a-brac at H, M. Newhallfe Co.'s, on Wednes- 
day and Thursday, notwithstanding the rain, was well attended both 
days by ladies and gentlemen. The sale comprised about 1,200 lots of 
choice Japanese Art Treasures. Such an offering is new here, but our 
Eastern friends appreciate it, and go into this sort of collections largely. 
We noticed among the buyers some of our leading merchants, Alex. Gro- 
gan, JabezHuwe, W. F. Babcock, Oliver Eldridge, and other substantial 
citizens. Mr. Eldridge officiated as auctioneer, and did the Japanese de- 
scriptions with a gusto that gave credit to the sale. 

Mr. J. W. Knox, of Pittsburg, Penn., is in town. He is having his 
fine stock of horses and Leverisb Setters moved from the East to San 
Jose, which he intends making his home. He has consigned to Dr. Jes- 
sup, of this city, two of the held trial stock of Leverish Setters, one a 
puppy about 8 months old, from Lord Downey's "Duke," out of " Bess," 
she by " Rob Roy;" the other, a two-year-old out of '"Dimple," from 
" Bel ton," and a known sister of " Nellie," of the great field trial. These 
are both perfect beauties, and are two of the finest blooded dogs ever sent 
to this State. 

" The Chinese Crisis, or John in California. "--This is the title of 
an admirable work published by L. S. Church and elegantly illustrated 
by T. J. Petit & Co. It is destined to be a hand book to all those who 
may be called upon to speak, write or otherwise deal with the Chinese 
question. It is full of reliable data, facts, figures, etc., showing what the 
Chinese have done, their numbers, their dispersion over the Pacific coast, 
and generally whatever is interesting and valuable in regard to "John in 
California." 

Bon Voyage. — By the steamer Citu of Sydney, on Monday last, de- 
parted for Australia Mrs, Emma Harding Brittan, and her husband, Dr. 
W. G. ifrittan. The talented and accomplished lady has been in our 
city some four months, and has made many warm friends. Her lectures 
at Pacific Hall will long be remembered with delight, and she may feel 
sure that in her pilgrimage many of us "are with her in the spirit." We 
wish our friends a happy voyage and a speedy return. 

What is the use of waiting for the Legislature to pass a bill reducing 
the price of gas, when you can get it reduced at least twenty per cent, 
without so waiting? The bill may never pass, and even if it does, yon 
can reduce the price still further by using patent gas burners as sold by 
David Bush, 27 and 29 New Montgomery street, opposite the Palace 
Hotel. Reduces your gas bill 20 per cent. sure. 



Schmidt Quintette Musical Recitals. —Very sensibly, the manage- 
ment of these charming entertainments postponed the opening concert 
until next Friday evening, February 1st. This step was taken in the in- 
terest of the large list of subscribers— numbering over five hundred— in 
consequence of the late excessive rains. The dates are now definitely 
fixed for February 1st and 15th, and March 1st and 15th. 

DIVIDEND NOIICE- 

Masonic Savings and Loan Bank, No. 6 Post street, M»- 
sonic Temple, San Francisco —At a meeting of the Board of Directors of this 
Bank, held January 21st. 1ST*, a dividend was declared at the rate of ei^ht (8) per 
cent, per annum on Term Deposits, and six. and three-tenths (ll 3-10) per cent per 
annum on Ordinary Deposits, ror the semi-annual term ending January 2sth, ia78, 
payable on and after January 25th. L878, free til Federal Tax. 
January 21, 1ST3. (Jan. 3tk] H. T. GRAVES, Secretary. 

J. BECHTINGER, MD, 
f the University of Vienna, has removed to the southwest 

corner of GEARY and DUPONT. J*"- 26 - 



o 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Jan. 26, 1878. 



AND YET. 

You would not think her cheeks were blooming' roses j 
No line of pearls her beaming- smile discloses ; 
No delicate perfumes around her hover; 

And yet I love her! 
She rivals not the sun in dazzling brightness ; 
She steps not like the fawn with fairy lightness j 
Her eyes resemble not the stars above her j 

And yet I love her! 
No waving tresses fall in rich profusion ; 
No classic form, half-hidden by illusion, — 
No brilliant fancy could I e'er discover ; 

And yet I love her! 
For she is truly sensible and good ; 
And all the charms that make true womanhood 
Unite in her ; and she loves me moreover ; 

And so I love her! 
Besides that, she's my muvver. 
— Win. Cullen JJongfellow, in "Fuck's" Almanac. 

THE CHINESE IN AMERICA. 

The following is the text of the letter addressed by the six companies 
of Chinese in San Francisco to the Secretary of State: 
Hon. William M. Starts, Secretary of State, Washington, D.C.: 

Sik: The letter of Senator Sargent, bearing date of yesterday (Nov. 29), 
demands a reply from us, and also to briefly call your attention to facts 
undeniable. Why, after long years of persecution and suffering, we 
finally appealed to the Government of the United States for that pro- 
tection accorded us under existing treaties, and nothing more. We first 
desire to call your attention to the fact that the Government of the 
United States has, since the adoption of the treaty with the Imperial 
Government of China, demanded and received nearly SS00,000 indemnity 
for outrages committed on American citizens (and their property) residing 
in China. In no instance of outrage has that Government failed to pay. 
Fur a long series of years our people have quietly submitted to robberies, 
murders, arsons, and assaults, and in not one case in fifty have the per- 
petrators been brought to punishment. With no one, until quite recently, 
to plead for us, we have suffered three months in silence. Hundreds of 
our countrymen have been murdered, and can Senator Sargent deny that 
95 per cent, of the perpetrators escaped punishment? The recent mas- 
sacre of four of our countrymen at Chico met with prompt action because 
good citizens of this country came forward with money and influence and 
demanded that justice should be done in vindication of their good name. 
And this is an exception to our long list of oppression, not the least of 
which are the unjust and discriminating laws passed against us, and deny- 
ing us the protection we are taxed for. Senator Sargent says the law 
officers of the counties of this State have sought diligently to punish out- 
rages against our people, and have succeeded to a great extent. We re- 
ply by asking what has been done to punish this class in the vicinity of 
his own home — outrages so recent that they must be fresh in his memory. 
Our people were driven from Antioch, and their property destroyed in 
open day. Who was ever punished or even arrested ? Has the Senator 
forgotten that a few weeks since our people were driven from Penrhyn, 
Rocklin, Pine Grove and Lacent Ravine, their houses burnt and property 
destroyed, hundreds driven from their mining claims, purchased quite re- 
cently from Caucasians, and not an arrest made? And, the July riots in 
this fair city, when upward of thirty Chinese laundries and dwellings 
were raided, some burned, one of our countrymen killed, and his body 
thrown into the flames, and not an arrest made by the authorities, State 
or municipal? We appealed to the Governor of this Commonwealth and 
to the Mayor of this city to stop these outrages, and we have repeatedly 
asked their protection. We do not question but the Courts are honest, 
but we know that the officers who surround the judiciary are pledged to 
persecute us before they can fill their various posts. Regarding the fears 
which the Senator expresses to you, that the coast will either be Mongo- 
lian or American, we answer that for twenty-five years the immigration 
over emigration has not averaged four thousand annually. It is a sad 
commentary to us when a United States Senator volunteers the assurance 
that the municipality of San Francisco is liable to us for damage to our 
property when he is so fully aware of our surroundings. In conclusion, 
we desire to reiterate what we said to the Chairman of the late Chinese 
Congressional Commission, the late Senator Morton,' in a communication 
addressed to him, "that if the restricting the emigration of our people 
to this free country would have a tendency to allay the fears of the timid 
and protect our people in their just rights, we would give our aid and 
countenance to any measure to that end."' We still adhere to that deter- 
mination. The foregoing are a few of our grievances, wherefor we have 
finally appealed to this great and free Government for aid, and only ask 
of it what was required of the Imperial Government of China to assent 
to on account of Americans. By Chikese Six Companies. 

Chinese Merchants' Exchange, Nov. 30, 1877. 

The New York Tribune announces that the Attorney -General, by direc- 
tion of the President, has given considerable attention to the question of 
protecting the Chinese in California. The discussion of this matter has 
occupied considerable time in the Cabinet, but no action has been taken 
upon it. The difficulty which the Attorney- General finds is that there 
is no authority for the Government to interfere unless the State should 
ask for aid. Under the present circumstances this is not to be expected, 
as political influences in both parties in California are arrayed against the 
Chinese. The six companies, and those to whom they have appealed to, 
urge upon the Administration the issuance of an order to the District- 
Attorney at San Francisco, directing him to enforce United States laws. 
This, they assert, should be done as a matter of good faith toward China, 
and by way of observing the terms of the treaty with that Power. To 
this view of the question the Attorney-General is not quite ready to 
assent. He holds that, although the treaty guarantees protection to the 
Chinese, Congress has thus far failed to authorize the Goverment to in- 
terfere in any one State in order to carry the treaty into effect. The At- 
torney-General is of opinion that the matter should form the subject of a 
special message from the President to Congress, and that, meanwhile, 
every constitutional means should be employed by the Californian State 
Government to prevent any future attack upon the Chinese.— China Ex- 
press. 



insurance. 



INSURANCE AGENCY OF 
HUTCHINSON & MANN 

JffO 314 CA&IFOKNSA STREET, SAX FKAXCISCO. 



AGENTS FOR. THB 

Girard Ins. Co Philadelphia, Pa. New Orleans Ins. Ass'n New Orleans. 

Union Ins. Co Galveston, Texas St. Paul P. & M. Ins. Co... St. Paul, Minn. 

Home Ins. Co Columbus, Ohio ] Atlas Ins. Co Hartford Conn. 

People's Ins. Co Newark, N. J. Revere Fire Ins. Co Boston. 

National L. I. Co.,U. S. A.. Wash's, D. C. [Trade Ins. Co Camden, N. J. 

Capital Repres ented, Twelve Millions. 

POLICIES ISSUED ON DESIRABLE PROPERTY aT FAIR RATES. LOSSES 
EQUITABLY ADJUSTED AND PROMPTLY PAID. 

HITTCHItfSOar «fc SIASfW, General Agents s 
May 5. 314 California street, San Franciseo. 

HOME MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY OF CALIFORNIA. 

Principal Office, 406 California Street, Sau Francisco. 
Cash Assets, January 1, 1877, §£93,291 ; Liabilities, $5,932; Surplus for Policy 
Holders, $589,339. J. F. Houghton, President; Geo. H. Howard, Vice-President 
Charles R. Story, Secretary. JR. II. MAGILL,, II. H. BIGELOW, General Agents. 

Directors. — San Francisco — Geo. H. Howard, John H. Redington, J. F. Houghton 
R. B. Gray, Robert Watt, John Currey, L. L. Baker, W. F. Whittier, C. C. Burr, E. 
M. Root, W. H. White, J. L. N. Shepard, W. M. Greenwood, George S. Mann, Cyrus 
Wilson, W. T. Garratt, 0. Waterhouse, A. P. Hotaling, A. Bluck, A. K. P. Harmon, 
G. S. Johnson, W. O. Wilson, A. W. Bowman, H. L. Dodge, Charles R. Story. Ala- 
meda County Branch— V. D. Moodv, Chauncy Taylor, A. C. Henry, Robert S. Far- 
relly, Joseph B. Marlin, W. B. Hardy. T. B. Simpson. San Diego— A. H. Wilcox. 
Sacramento — Mark Hopkins, D. W. Earl, Julius Wetzlar, James Carolan, San Jose — 
T. Ellard Beans, B. D. Murphy, A. Pfister, J. H. Dibble, J. S. Carter, Jackson Lewis, 
Jacob Rich, John Auzerais, John Balbach. Stockton — H. H. Hewlett, Chas. Belding, 
J. D. Peters, A. W. Simpson, H. M. Fanning. Marysville— D. E. Knight. Grass 
Valley— Wm. Watt, T. W. Sigouruey. Portland, Oregon— W. S. Ladd, C. H. Lewis, 
P. Wasserman, B. Goldsmith, D. Macleay. Virginia City, Nevada— John Gillig, Isaac 
L. Re qua. March 17. 

FIRE AND MARINE INSURANCE— UNIGN INS- CO. OF S. F. 

The California Lloyds.--- Established in I8GI.---K0S. 416 and 
413 California street. Cash capital *750,000 in Gold. Assets exceed £1,000,000 
Coin. Fair Rates ! Prompt Settlement of Loses ! ! Solid Security ! ! DIRECTORS. 
—San- Francisco— J. Mora Moss, N. G. Kittle, M. J. O'Connor, R. S. Floyd, Moses 
Heller, Adam Grant, Daniel Meyer, Autoine Borel, Charles Kohler, Joseph Seller, 
I. Lawrence Pool, A Weill, Joseph Brandenstein, Charles Baum, James Moftitt, Ed- 
ward Cadwalader, Benjamin Brewster, L. Cunningham, W. M. Hoag, Nicholas Lu- 
ning, John Parrott, L. A. Booth, J. Baum, M. D. Sweeney, Bartlett Doe, Gustave 
Touchard, J. H. Baird, J. G. Kittle, George C. Hickox, C. Duconimun, Wm. Scholle, 
John Conly, I. Steinbart, N. B. Stone, J. O. Eldridge, A. B. Phipps, Jas. M. Goewey. 
GUSTAVE TOUCHARD, President. N. G. KITTLE, Vice-President. 

CnAitLEs D. Haven, Secretary. Geo. T. BonEN, Surveyor. July 28. 

THE STATE INVESTMENT AND INSURANCE CO. 
FIBtE A\D MAKLVE. 

C^ash Assets, §1450,000.-- -Principal Office, 218 and 220 Ban-. 
J some street, San Francisco. Officers : — Peter Donauuk, President ; A. J. 
Bryant, Vice-President ; Guakles H. Gushing, Secretary; H. H.Watson, Marine 
Surveyor. Board of Directors: — Peter Donahue, James Irvine, C. D. O'Sullivan, 
A. Bocqueraz, R. Harrison, A. H. Rutherford, U. Bailey, E. W. Corbert, George O. 
McMulUn,A. J. Bryant, Frank M. Pixley, E Burke, H. H. Watson, Dr. C. F. Bueklev, 
P. J. White, W. A. Piper, M. Mayblum, Richard Ivers, John Rosenfcld, Daniel 
Callaghan. P. II. Russell, Sacramento. John G. Downey, Los Angeles. Wm. 
Hood, Sonoma County. H. W. Seale, Mayfield. Geo. Rutherford, San Jose. Feb. 13. 

INSURANCE_COMPANIES. 

IMPERIAL OF LONDON, NORTHERN OF LONDON, AND 
QJJBEN OF LIVERPOOL. 



Aggregate Cash Capital. 

Robert Dickson, Manager. 
July 14. ^^^ 



833,000,000. 

W. LANE BOOKER, Agent and Attorney. 
317 California street, S. F. 



NSW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO., OF BOSTON, 

Has transacted the business of rife Insurance for nearly 
thirty-five years. Its assets amount to over Fourteen Million Dollars. The 
law of Massachusetts makes all its Policies nonforfeitable. It is a Purely Mutual Com- 
pany, dividing- every cent of surplus among Policy-holders. This is the Only Com- 
pany on the Pacific Coast governed by the Massachusetts Lapse Law. This company 
has corniced with the new Insurance Laws of California. 

WALLACE EVERSON, General Agent. 
Sept. 22.] 328 Montgomery str eet. 

THE SWISS MARINE INSURANCE COMPANIES COMBINED. 

Baloise, of Basle, Capital 5,000,000 francs; Helvetia, of 
St. Gall, Capital 10,000,000 francs ; Sehweiz, of Zurich, Capital 5,000,000 francs. 
These three Companies are liable jointly and severally for all losses that may be sus- 
tained. Losses made payable in all the principal seaports of the world. In* the set- 
tlement of all claims under an English policy, our Companies will strictly adhere to 
the conditions and customs adopted at Llo3 r ds, and submit to English jurisdiction 
June 9. HENRY BALZER & CO., Agents, 213 Sansome St ., S. F. 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INSURANCE CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 

(Capital 95,000,000.— Agents: Balfour, Gutbrie & Co., Wo. 
J 230 California street, San Francisco. No. IS. ' 

TEN PER CENT. FIRST MORTGAGE BONDS AT PAR. 

Tbe Sierra Flume and Lumber Company have mortgag-eil 
their large property— principally lands — to secure the payment of 1,200 Bonds 
of $500 each, running for one, two or three years, and bearing ten per cent, interest, 
payable semi-annually. Two hundred Bonds of either series are now offered for sale 
at par, to close this season's business. The remainder will be held for another year. 
The property cost over 81,400,000, and has produced the last six months $300,000 
worth of lumber, at a cost of $400,000, most of which is stacked and drying, to be in 
readiness for sale, and for which there is a good market, both at home and abroad. 
Mr. Alvinza Hayward, being the chief owner, will give a written guarantee that tbe 
Bonds and interest will be paid at maturity. Merchants' Exchange Bank Stock will 
be taken in exchange at $75 per share. For Bonds and further particulars apply to 
R. G. SNEATH, Presidents. F. and L. Co., 
Nov. 17. 423 California street, Sau Francisco. 

THOMAS DAY, 

Importer of every variety of Gas Fixtures, Crystal, Gilt, 
Steel and Bronze, and a full assortment of Marble and Bronze Clocks and fine 
Bronzes; also a full line of Plumbers' Goods. 122 and 124 Sutter Street, San Fran- 
cisco. Jan. 27. 



Jan. 26, 1878. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 






EVERY DAT. 

I wrvath U sh 

■ 

■ 

Inu- with it - 

v d*yl 
H nee, while nil thing! tn •!■ 
Over lift' - !* srentful DtaAh ft seeker for its pn 

.. bells are tolling, tolling. Let us be 

■ h\y ! K-. . iv day I 

THE EMMA MINE. 

The renewal of shipments of ore from tl I Emma Mine 

bsrehnlden in the now si- 
formed for working it. to consider anew 
ioc ui tin property they >■> thoughtlessly threw away. Tin 
.ill the clamor ae t" the all m practiced in the transfer »>f tin 1 

mine to the E II as sinos it hss ion 

at if any reliance was to be placed in the 
• of practii .»! miners who had visited the property, bat were pecu- 
niarily disinterested in the result <>f the working', the Erotp.fi 

ine, and worthy of That the English 

pi ice for the mi I, bul thai | nown to 

the pul. Hi* invested one penny, so I 

'..Ini speculated were like children who spend their money in cov* 

iys, then cry because the money is goue, and Bmash the toys to vent 

their spite. As the London Emma shareholders have now neither the 

capital invested nor the property, ' : passionately consider thi ir 

position, and estimate the advantages of patience and common sense in 

the conduct of mining iparedwith rashness and the love 

of litigation. From the time the ESmma Mine passed into the hands of 

the English company, exploration (the one thing necersary to secure per- 

.* profits in muring] was entirely neglected, and a svstem <>f careless 

was carried nn which in a few months would bring into the 

winding-up courts even such properties as the i ape Copper, Linares, For- 

Pontgibaud, and others equally successful. The London Emma 

shareholders appeared to suppose that even ordinary business en xg y and 

judgment were unnecessary, and that nothing had to be done but receive 

the periodica] dividends forever. Such marvelous benefits are not secured 

in mining any more than in other business. 

And the puerile simplicity of the shareholders is more apparent when 
it is considered that the fact that the property was being ruined by bad 
iment, in the shape of neglect to provide for the future, was well 
known to the shareholders lon<; before it was too late to retrieve their po- 
sition, and when even a small outlay upon exploratory work would have 
made the Emma property rank at least with the Richmond or any other 
American concern on the English market as a permanently profitable un- 
dertaking. Foremost in his reiterated assertions that the Emma was 
being crippled through inattention to development was an esteemed curre- 
nt of the Minimi Journal— Mr. Henry Sewell — and the few of his 
facts re-published recently suffice to show bow small a drag upon the re- 
turns from the mine would have sufficed to do all that was necessary. 
Well may -Mr. Sewell wish the readers of the Journal to be reminded how 
often he requested Mr. A. MacDougall to accept the £50,000 offered to 
the English shareholders by Messrs. T. W. Park and Albert Grant to 
work the mine. It should he remembered that this sum was only to be 
returned in case the mine paid for it— that is, three- fourths of the net 
proceeds were to be for the English shareholders, the remaining one-fourth 
to be devoted to the payment of the £50,000. Mr. Sewell thinks there is 
no doubt that the shareholders have been badly directed in their lawsuit- 
mg business; and he mentions that he predicted to Mr. MacDougall that 
he would never gain this suit in America, which was a greater reason that 
the 150,000 should have been accepted. 

It is but justice to Mr. Sewell to state that bis views appear to be now re- 
ceiving full confirmation, although at the time he wrote they were ig- 
nored, from the circumstance, probably, of his opinion being diametri- 
cally opposite to those of Mr. Warren Hussey, one of the original vendors 
and a large local shareholder ; of Mr. Silas Williams, the mine agent ; of 
Mr. George Attwood, the mine manager ; of Mr. Clarence King, a cel- 
ebrated American geologist; Prof. Murray, a mineralogist; and Mr. 
.John Longxnaid, a mining engineer. 

The accuracy of Mr. Sewell's views will certainly add to his already 
high reputation as a mining engineer, and although the Emma has been 
lost to the English capitalists, a compensation may be found in the neigh- 
boring mines which are still in English hands. 

One of the principal grounds on which the proposed winding-up Order 
was now asked for, was that Mr. Macdougall bad recently circulated a 
pamphlet [written and published by Mr. Henry Sewell, M.E.) with reference 
to the affairs of the Company, whicli had influenced the majority of the 
shareholders. 

The total product of the mine, tinder the management of the N. Y. Era- 
ma Mining Co., for two months of Nov. and Dec, 77, is 93 tons, by an av- 
erage assay value of 184 oz. silver and 45 per cent, of lead per ton, the 93 
tons being worth Injround numbers $20,000, which will be found correct from 
the following, taken from the company's books : Total, 92 tons, 1,715 tbs 
ore, assaying from — Silver, 30.45 oz.; Lead, 35 per cent.; Silver, 61.24 oz.; 
Lead, 39 per cent.; Silver, 72.92 oz.; Lead, 42.V per cent.; Silver, 138.54 
oz.; Lead, 51 per cent.; Silver, 69.99 oz.; Lead, 4 G \ per cent.; Silver, 
58.17 oz, ; Lead, 48 percent.; Silver, 355.58 oz. ; Lead, 47 per cent.; Sil- 
ver, 114.46 oz.; Lead, 48.\ per cent.; Silver, 545.40 oz.; Lead, 45 percent.; 
Silver, 48.26 oz.; Lead, 27 per cent.; Silver; 427.25 oz.; Lead, 544 P er 
cent.; Silver, 278.95 oz.; Lead, 56 per cent. 

Large quantities of lower grade ore is being piled up for concentration 
in the Spring. The working expenses for the two months, §5,000. — Lon- 
don Mining Journal, December 2Wi } 1877. 



The new tariff bill reduces the articles taxed from 2,160 to 400. The 
country would seem to be moderately protected with 400 articles on the 
tariff.— Spr in// tithl Republican. 



' ' The light of other days " was either a farthing candle or a penny dip. 



BOOK NOTICEa 

Tho Khedive's Egypt ; or, The Old House of Bondage Under New 

■ 



: . 



The aid < '-onnul < ■ t. ■» in 

Etfypt, the Nile land 

under it* hut I present Khedive. There i 

thai i* new and nothing that is unintereatin j in 
opportunities for obtaining correct Inl in with hu well 

liscretion and evident oau 
refined taste, will oommend the work pai 

. . i f ol thi ■ n on 

rcial inter lourae with it, and viewing it 

i the spectacles ••!" sentimental travelei i I lealoue missionaries. 

;it brilliancy, and utrives not for lasting 
if the " Old H«u ol I idago," and 
relates bt in it byMehemot Ail and his uco or, 

sketchin icial, political, ana economical condition to di | 

the work closes with April ; 

port of T!i'- r. n ;i A i, of Japan. For the Fiscal fear Ended 

June soth, 1877. 

Being a full and complete statement of the operations <d the Japanese 
Bee Department, which appears to be well organized and operated 
in an efficient manner. 



ATTENTION, MIXIXU COMPANIES I 

RICK \RD'S PATENT OXIDIZINtf AND CHL03IDIZIN3 FURNACE, 

For Roasting Copper, Silver and Other Ores, prior to Leaching or 

Amalgamation I 

The most striking- advantages which it oilers above nil 
other recent inventions ol this- nature niaj fcw briefly summed up as follows: 

1st. ira cmkal-nkss ■ The cost of its erection (ex-royalty and f reight) not exceoding 
$1,600, for a capacity to ru:i-u. :ui.l Hilorodize twenty tons per day, viz. : brick work, 
#1,00(1, and iron work, including blower, 9600. 

2d. Short time required for erection, viz.: 14 days, after providing all materials, 
with ;i BtiiSciencyi i labor. 

3d, No expensive, heavy or complicated machinery being necessary, involving 
heavy freight to the district where it may he required, brick ami clay, generally 
obtainable on the spot, being the chief materials required in its construction. 

4th. No skilled tabor or technical experience is necessary to work it, two ordinary 
laborers being sufficient to attend doit when in full operation. 

5th. It does not easily get out of order, and is readily repaired by an ordinary 
mason or blacksmith when it doe3. 

Oth. The royalty, or license to use it, is exceedingly moderate, removing thereby all 
temptation to evade or infringe the patent. 

Till. Calculating tabar at S3 per aay, and wood at SO per cord, the cost of roast- 
ing is but little over $1 50 per ton (ex-salt when chlorodized), at these high California 
rates for tabor and fuel. 

One of them is now in the course of erection by the Aztec Gold and Silver Mining 
Company, at their mill in the Aztec District, Santa Rita Mountains, Southern Ari- 
zona. At their cilice, :)01 Montgomery street, rooms 14 and 15, a model maybe seen, 
and working drawings, with all further information necessary to enable any ordinary 
mason to construct the furnace, may be obtained from 

COL. J. D. GRAHAM. 

Pamphlets, with illustration and full description, seDt on application. Nov. 24. 

JOYCE'S SPORTING AMMUNITION. 

[ESTABLISHED 1820.] 

Tlie attention of Sportsmen is invited to tfae following? 
Ammunition, of the best quality, now in general use throughout England, 
India and the Colonies : Joyce's Treble Waterproof and F 3 Quality Percussion 
Caps ; Chemically-prepared Cloth and Felt Gun Wadding; Joyce's Gas-Tight Car- 
tridges, for Pin-fire and Central-lire lireeeh-loading Guns ; Wire Cartridges, for killing 
game at long distances, and every description of Sporting Ammunition. Suld by 
all gun-makers and dealers in gunpowder. 

FREDERICK JOYCE & CO., Patentees and Manufacturers, 
Dec. 3^. 57 Upper Thames street, London. 

VICX'S FLOWER AND VEGETABLE SEEDS 

Are planted by a million people in America. See Tick's 
CATALOGUE, ;i00 illustrations, only 2 cents. VICK'S ILLUSTRATED 
MONTHLY MAGAZINE, 32 pages, fine illustrations and colored plate in each num- 
ber. Price, SI 25 a year ; five copies for *5. VICK'S FLOWER and VEGETABLE 
GARDEN, 50 cents in paper covers ; with elegant cloth covers, §1. All my publica- 
tions are printed in English and German. Address, 
J an. 5. JAMES VICK, Rocheste r, Ne w Yo rk. 

RUHL BR03., 
522 Montgomery Street, 

Sole Agents Tor €S. it. Mumm A- CO., Reims, Champagnes; 
Plauat & Co., Cognac, Brandies ; W. &, J. Graham & Co., Oporto, Port Wines ; 
fit. Moreno Demora, Pto. Sta Maria, Sherries ; E. Anheuser & Co "s lire wing Associa- 
tion, St, Louis, Lager Beer ; Jules Herman i Co., Bordeaux, Clarets and Sauternes ; 
P. A. Mumm, Fran kfort O. M., Hock Wines. Dec. S. 

MME. B. ZEITSKA'S INSTITUTE, 922 POST STREET. 

French, Germati ami English Day anil Boarding School for 
Young Ladies.— The next term will commence January 3, 1878. Kindergarten 
connected with the Institute. For particulars, address 
j a n. e. MME. D. ZKITSKA, Principal. 

CAREW LEDGER PAPERS 

Have no equal for milking Blank Books. John G. Hodge 
& Co., Importers and Manufacturing stationers, 327, 329, 331 Sansome street 
Agents fo r the Pacific Coast. Nov. 4. 

MILLS' SEMINARY. 
he next term will conimeneeou Wednesday, January 9th, 

1878. For circulars or information, apply to REV. C T. MILLS, 

Jan. 5. _ Brooklyn. 

BESC FOOD FOR INFANTS, 

Supplying the highest amount of nourishment in the most 
digestible and convenient form. SAVORY & MOORE, 143 New Bond street, 
London, and all Chemist s and St orekeepers through out the world. June 30. 

A. D. REMINGTON 
accessor to F. M. SpRiiliUng A Co., Paper Warehouse, 411, 

413 and 415 Sansome street, San Francisco, 

P. M. SPAULDING and F. \V. AINSWORTH, 

A. D. REMINGTON, New York. [July 7.] Managers, San Francisco. 

OFFICES OF THE AEROPLANE NAVIGATION CO., 
Jan. 4. No. 607 to 615 Merchant street, San Francisco. 



T 



S 



8 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Jan. 2C. 1878. 



"WHAT IS A "MATERIAL INTEREST?" 

The ' ' News Letter" is proud in the consciousness that it is known 
at home and abroad as a trusted and loyal advocate of Material In- 
terests. It isay be, just now, an interesting question as to what con- 
stitutes a " material interest." If all of us— millionaires and working 
men, muscle owners, and cultivated brain proprietors— were duly alive to 
the answer, the certainty is that we should see more clearly how de- 
pendant the whole is upon each of its parts. The News Litter's seDse of 
the term is a concrete truth, which cannot part with one of its atoms 
without damage to the whole. Banks, railroads, steam lines, mining 
companies, imports, exports, incorporations, and generally whatever 
brings profit or advantage are material interests. But there are two 
material interests that rise superior to these, that are higher, nobler and 
better than them all, because they all have their origin in, and only exist 
by reason of the exercise of these two. Need we say that we refer _to 
MDS0L1 axd brains. These are the initiators of all other material in- 
terests. They together began hy giving us the most primitive methods 
of accumulating wealth, and together they have marched on until we 
have cached the era of the telegraph and the steam engine, and still their 
co-ordinate progress has not reached its limit, nor will it so long as in the 
earth that surrounds us, in the air above us, or iu the waters below, there 
remain elements unconquered. Thus that man is a fool who would en- 
deavor to sever the connection which exists between these two material 
interests, which are primary, and the others, which, after all, are but 
secondary. Capital is good, hut it is labor that gave it an existence. 
Money is excellent, but it is brains alone which can direct it into useful 
channels. The News Letter, therefore, above all things, is a promoter of 
the interests of muscle and brains. They are the highest material irterests 
it knows, and it feels that it would be false to its mission, and false to 
human progress if it were to fail in its duty to the one or the other. Capital 
and labor have equally their rights. The one cannot trench upon the 
domain of the other without danger to both. Their interests are mutual. 
They should not be enemies, because of right they are naturally allies. 
He is the truest friend to both, who, when occasion serves, dares say to 
labor: " You are alarming capital; and. to your own injury, drying up its 
productiveness," and who shirks not the duty of telling capital that it is 
"needlessly domineering," and that it is "working ultimate damage to 
itself by pressing too heavily upon labor." We are not sure that an honest 
investigation of recent events, and of the underlying causes which led to 
them, would not justify us in thus addressing both the capitalist and 
the working man, and in happily reuniting them for the promotion of 
their material interests, we should certainly be inclined to exclaim, 
"Brothers, brothers! You were both in wrong!" 



THE EVENTS OF THE "WEEK. 
"When we wrote last week the city was all excitement. The agi- 
tators' trials were on. The Mayer had issued his proclamation suppress- 
ing public meetings. The police were dispersing groups of citizens with 
their clubs. The Legislature, under the influence of the scare, were 
passing a most extraordinary gag-law, and the authorities, who ought to 
have been informed as to what they said, declared there was real danger 
of incendiarism, and even of murder. In the presence of that state of 
things, we were not willing that one word of ours should seem to run 
counter to what were alleged to be the necessities of law and order. We 
lent whatever moral force we could to the authorities, but not without 
considerable misgivings as to the wisdom of their course. We expressed 
the hope, but certainly did not entertain the belief, that they knew what 
they were doing, or precisely why they were doing it. We felt they were 
in danger — iu a metaphorical sense, of course— of losing their heads. 
Hence we counseled that they should have "clear, distinct purposes in 
view, keep their heads cool, and then go ahead." We hoped that "mon- 
strous and unpardonably bad management had not been exercised by the 
officers responsible for instituting the proceedings and working up the 
cases," but we believed precisely the coutrary, and the result has shown 
that we were not mistaken. As this is the second fiasco of the kind, it is 
hard to measure the censure due to those who invoked the law without 
evidence to support it. If nothing more was said and done by Kearney 
than was proved, then the dailies have grossly misrepresented bim, and 
have been the real and only utterers of incendiarism. Prosecutions for 
the use of mere language, unaccompanied by any overt act, may in rare 
cases be justifiable, but it is certain that they should at all times be en- 
tered upon with clear foresight, cool judgment, and a reasonable chance 
of success. Indeed success is their principal, if not only, grounds of justi- 
fication. To fail is to render the second condition worse than the first. 
It is calculated to turn blatherskiting agitators into martyred heroes. 
That is just about what it has done. Kearney's star is now in the ascend- 
ant. The very authorities who went clean daft in their frantic efforts to 
arrest him upon charges innumerable, to pile up hail unprecedentedly 
high, and to " send him to San Quentin sure," are now engaged falling 
down and worshiping him as if be were already the Deus ex Machina, and 
as if the whole round of public offices were at his disposal. If the igno- 
rant drayman, Kearney, is to-day a power that must be recognized, we 
have to thank the watched rivalry of certain dailies, and the stupid 
folly of certain city authorities, for the lamentable fact. 



TOO LONG IGNORED. 

It is now established beyond the possibility of question that there is 
real distress among the unemployed. This fact has perhaps been too long 
ignored. It is a condition of things that might well have been antici- 
pated, and wise forethought would have done well to have provided for it. 
There is no need to search far for its cause. It is idle to say that it arises 
from anything that docs not appear upon the surface. The failure of last 
year's crops is quite sufficient to account for it. The bulk of our popula- 
tion is engaged in agricultural pursuits. Heretofore laborers have been 
able to save enough dining the eight or nine months of harvest and seed 
time to enable them -to maintain themselves for the remainder of the 
year. The past season, however, was an altogether exceptional one, and 
the workinginan finds himself in consequence without the means upon 
which he has hitherto depended for his winter's sustenance. That condi- 
tion of things must remain whilst Nature is working, and until harvest 
arrives. A period of three months has therefore to be bridged over. The 
railroad company, that is rapidly providing employment that will place 
one thousand men beyond actual want, is doing just what might have been 
expected of it. The Legislature is providing for useful work. Private 
individuals should, as far as possible, follow suit. The rains have come, 
the harvest is assured, and. by the first of May, all will be hanpy again. 



SENATORIAL BONES. 



If there is good in everything, 
And sermons come from stones, 
It's possible that something good 
May even come from Bones. 
Those who have seen the Senator, 
Well know it won't be meat'; 



Which we shall shortly hear, 
When Bones, the horny-handed 

Bones, 
Shows it to be quite clear 
That only carpenters "an' sich" 
This happy land should rule, 



Marrow, perhaps— but we shall see, And he who 's not a workingman 



Must -needs be knave or fool. 
The dailies, suddenly polite, 
Their new allegiance vow — 
" Old Bones " that was a week ago, 
" Good Mr. Bones " is now. 



When Bonesy takes his seat. 

Some worthy Senator may have 

A screw loose in his brain, 

Which noble Bones, the carpenter,. 

Can tighten up again ; 

Some Solomon may take this chance What compliment can we invent? 

To clip his flowing hair, We 're half inclined to "flop ;" 

And get our Senatorial "chips" Ah ! happy thought — it's right the 

To " shingle " it with care. scum 

Think of the oratory, too, Should float upon the top. 



INTERESTED TO COUNSELLOR CLARK. 

The News Letter does not believe in beating about the bush. If a 
thing is worth saying at all, it ought to be said for all that is in it. The 
Bulletin and (Jail have frequently of late given forth ominous hints as to 
certain branches of the Police department. Why not make a clean breast 
of it and say all they believed. Surely the day has gone by when even 
Pickering need fear that particular department. The Statute of Limita- 
tions is his sufficient protection, unless, indeed, there be cause of fear that 
we know not of. It is unbecoming in two great dailies to hint that, in 
regard to the most important of public departments which they apparently 
f t ar, to speak right nut. Now comes the Examiner and tells a circum- 
stantial story, but even it shrinks from naming the officer to whom it 
refers. We do not think that is fair to the gentleman aimed at. It 
affords him no opportunity, that an officer valuing his personal dignity, 
can avail himself of, to rise and explain. In justice to Counsellor Clark 
we supply the omission, and beg to say that our contemporary refers to 
him when it says that — " It is a notorious fact that one of the officials 
holding a very important position is engaged in a regular pawnbroker's 
business. Throughout the month he loans large sums, aggregating thou- 
sands of dollars, to his subordinates, charging the enormous rate of five 
per cent, per month interest. The officers, who are aware of his influence, 
often borrow when their necessities do not require it, knowing that to 
conciliate him, in this manner, ensures them great benefit. It is well 
known that the best borrowers secure easy details, and "beats" requiring 
less labor than the others. In addition to this, a great portion of his 
time is taken up during the month in making his loans, and one whole 
day every month, when the officers receive their pay, he is alongside of 
the Property Clerk collecting his principal and interest. On these occa- 
sions it is impossible to see him on other business than money matters. 
This is a subject that should be attended to. The eradication of this evil 
by the Legislature, will do as much to maintain the morale and discipline 
of the Department as any other step which that body can take in the di- 
rection of police matters." 

THE WATER QUESTION AGAIN. 
" Captain" John Mullan and " Joe" Nouges have long been voted 
bores and nuisances, in respect of their connection with the water ques- 
tion. In an unhappy hour they became the sponsors for an impossible 
scheme, which proposed the Feather Paver for its starting point. Ex- 
amination has invariably shown its utter uselessness; and engineers and 
commissioners have alike passed it by with the contempt it merits. We 
had supposed we had heard the last of it. We were mistaken. We had 
not reckoned upon the marvelous persistency of a brace of hired advocates 
who see a large contingent fee passing out of reach. Again, the " Cap- 
tain" and " Joe" are interposing their everlasting legal quibbles. Really 
is it not about time that the patience of the Commissioners and the Super- 
visors was exhausted ? That of the public has been long since. After 
nearly two years of examination, the Commissioners at last resolved defi- 
nitely upon a certain course, and have taken irrevocable action to carry 
it out. They condemned to public use the whole of the Peninsular sup- 
ply, and nominated appraisers to value the property so taken. 
Those nominations, in due course of law, came before the Board of Su- 
pervisors for ratification. The Board in its wisdom referred the names of 
the appointees to a Committee, for the purpose of inquiry as to their 
qualifications, fitness, etc. That Committee met and invited the Com- 
missioners to appear, in order, if necessary, to give reasons for the partic- 
ular selection of appraisers they had made. The question of the fitness, 
or otherwise, of those gentlemen was the only one before the Committee. 
Yet, strange to say, they admitted Messrs. Mullan & Nougues to their 
presence, and permitted them virtually to open up the whole question de 
novo. This was absurd; it was more — it was an unpardonable trifling 
with a large matter of public importance. The Supervisors are charged 
with a simple duty, and neither the law nor public opinion justifies them 
in entering upon other and larger considerations, with which they have 
nothing whatever to do, and which have already been finally determined 
by a Board of Commissioners specially clothed with powers for that 
purpose. 

THE "WAR NEWS. 

The war news that reaches us up to the hour of going to press does 
not come out very clear and distinct. Siill, we think that those who can 
read between the lines will not be at fault in comprehending what is 
really taking place. Turkey, driven to her last ditch, appears to have 
agreed to terms, and an armistice is virtually settled, pending the final 
signature of a peace treaty. It appears that document is to be signed at 
Constantinople by the Grand Duke Nicholas. This arrangement is un- 
derstood to satisfy Russian pride, without involving the occupation of 
Constantinople. One of the conditions agreed to by Turkey is that the 
Dardanelles are to be open to Russian men-of-war. But, as this is a ques- 
tion which other powers are concerned in, it is certain that there must be 
a European Conference before it can be finally settled. The English 
Cabinet would appear to have determined, some two or three days ago, to 
take steps to prevent Russian occupation of Constantinople ; but, as no 
such occupation is now proposed, all danger of war between England and 
Russia would seem to be over. 






CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



THE TOWN CRIER. 

"Vm that will ;.:»> the d*«il, »ir *tih >oo." 



We would like laturc, and think we 

IvwArurv, ttonney, Donnelly, Hew 

i\ml all the other y'n in the Worfc- 

nd nominate us For the next 

mcv, we will guarantee Ut pnt a 

by thifl tiay week. But we ramble and 

ill through the Legislature, 

t the * \ipitol, enact- 

write, or *|m?11, shall In- President ol the 

il any office higher than that of dish-washer in a pub- 

Imerican-born citizen aba)] be allowed 

that all Irish and German immigrants be naturalii 

ey arrive in this country. All capitalist* shall be banished 

difornia within thirty days, and their property di- 

Cearney, Wellock and oursi to give a new 

i make- busiuess generally lively. All persons who 

make ii shall be imprisoned for life, and 

. ■ 
* and Hopkins 1 mansions on Nob Hill 

boap by citizens prohibited under 
tried penalties known to the law. We have a fem 

1 idge Wallace and putting Philosopher P 
on the Supreme Bench : but they wiil keeptul next week, perhaps Longer. 
The stealing of Judge Joachimaen's bat from off the bench where he 
was pi - nt a thrill of horror right through the United States, 

after wire flashed the intelligence of the dastardly outrage North, 
South. Bast and Went. Although it is some days since the perpetration 
i.f this audacious and villainous crime, it is still difficult for a journalist 
with as -lecencyto approach the blood-curdling subject with 

:ui> degree of coolness. Not that the hat was a good one, not that it was 
■ new one, or that it had been paid for. Throwing aside 
all question of the hat's having a nap on it ; waiving all con- 
troversy as to whether it was a silk hat, a plug bat, a felt 
hat, a straw hat, a telescope hat, a brain-basin, a helmet, an Alpine hat, 
an opera hat, a Panama hat, or a slouch hat— in fact, shooting the hat 
to speak, the disgraceful fact remains that the Judge's hat 
was stolen. The thief is known. Four detectives and a squad of specials 
are after him, but will they Hud him '.' fie was an educated and a deeply 
read thief, and he had ascertained the fact that Justice is blind. But he 
was a cowardly thief, too, and rejoicing in his knowledge that the eyes of 
Justice were bandaged, and that both hands were occupied with a pair of 
and a dummy sword, he stole Justice's hat. Instead of hiding his 
head in shame, the wretched marauder covered his cocoanut with a judi- 
cial porringer, and the very heavens weep (it's raining now), and— well, 
he got away with the plug, that's all. 

No persons so bitterly regret the present " Hell controversy " so bit- 
terly as the ministers who started it. Having satisfactorily proved that 
Ls no hot hereafter, the pew-holders in their respective churches at 
once resign their seats and refuse to renew their subscriptions to the local 
damnation shops. They argue wisely — "no hell, no need for graduating 
in a penitence school ; no hell, no heaven — ergo, no hereafter; no hereaf- 
ter, no need to sleep every Sunday in a church when I've got a better 
sofa at home." However, we are sorry for the boys who have so foolishly 
given the business away, and, by way of encouragement, we may state 
that we are open to receive contributions, such as funny paragraphs, 
jokes and humorous matter from the cloth, at usual rates, until they can 
get into some more remunerative line of business. 

Bones, the newly elected Senator from Alameda, believes in the pass- 
age of a law prohibiting any man from possessing more than half a million 
dollars. Admirable idea! The Senator is a man of our choice. What 
does any one want with more than five hundred thousand dollars ? It is 
enough for us, even with our extravagant tastes— or we have always 
thought it would be. As we are, however, short of the amount four hun- 
dred and ninety-five thousand two hundred and sixteen dollars and forty 
two cents, of course we are not yet prepared to say bow it will be when 
the deficiency is made good, but we incline to the opinion that half a mil 
lion is enough. 

It is not good for man to work or to live alone, and at the age of thirty- 
two we are desirous of marrying. Correspondence is solicited from bearded 
ladies, Circassians, or other female curiosities, who, in return for a true 
heart and a devoted husband, would travel during the Summer months, 
and allow him to take the money at the door. We have tried writing by 
the column, and worked by the week, in the hope of eventually being 
able to buy a five-legged calf; but all in vain. Photographs exchanged 
with monstrosities. Principals only treated with. 

Senator Bones, the Workingman's candidate, is a carpenter by profes- 
sion—beg his pardon — trade. He says he will not joiner party until he can 
see his way plane. Having sacrificed his awl to politics, after he saw his 
evident duty, he proceeds now to the Legislature to file his protest against 
the chisels of monopolists. This augers well. It will be mortise advantage 
if he adzed, little grammar to his other accomplishments; but, if his head 
is level, he will follow this rule, viz. : To take his screw and nail all he can 
clinch. 

The Laundryruen's Anti-Chinese Club is now fully organized, as 
follows: Capt. Ryan, Grand High Mangle; G. S. Fungoid, Most Worthy 
Starcher, and James Hallett, Right Worthy Stiff Chemiloon. The other 
officers of the Lodge consist of a Most Worshipful Senior and Junior 
Washboard, Venerable Flat Iron, Worthy Ruffler, and Most Royal Blue. 
The object of the Association savors slightly of the Mont de Piete", its 
object being to get all their customers clothes in soak as frequently as 



Bush Street has been blockaded the last two days by crowds of bald- 
headed octogenarians. Supposing it to be a veteran brigade of labor 
agitators, the press of this city sent reporters to find out what was the 
matter. The crush was eventually ascertained to be caused by the natural 
desire of our old forty-niners to get tickets in time for a female minstrel 
troupe advertised for to-night. 



Poets, as a rule. ■ dinner at the proper time (that 

n town and 

tli. r day nne of our looal 

O'Brien (this individual must not 11 1 and O'Brien), 

ily before dark, and. inspired l> of the 

scene (he was sober), wrote the foil.. wing beautiful lines : 

of toil, 
And before me mj 

Am! < >. but love's flow 
Wiu-u I oome home, when I come home 
Moral: Nothing inspires a man to write verses like the smell of beef- 

. 

Big Sawney, a-* they called him, went up to Dutch Flat ten years ago 
I steadily at .sluicing until last week, when he took it 
into his head to get married. Sine-.- L868 he had never been out of the 
township) and it was* only indefati [abl perseverance at working a poor- 
paying claim that bad enabled him to save up enough to support a wife. 
Sawney was, among other things, as brown as a berry and as treckly as a 
ladybird, bo ( before be offered bis hand to the saloon-keeper's daughter, 
ided that it would be as well to send for a bottle of skin lotion 
which was advertised in a weekly paper-that he had read one Sunday. He 
sent for the lotion, and took the whole bottle before he went to bed. The 
community regret bis loss greatly, and are talking about offering resolu- 
tions of condolence to the girl. 

A bouquet is a thing of beauty while it lasts, and flowers are as a 
ride heralds of joy. But a careless florist's boy left two canielia crosses 
and a bouquet tied up with crape at President Hayes' mansion, the other 
night, on the occasion of his silver wedding, while lie ruthlessly delivered 
an elegant basket of flowers, with a card wishing the recipient many 
happy returns of the day, to a gentleman whose mother-in law lay dead 
in the next block. Now the donor wonders why his name is stricken 
from the list of tea-drinkers at the White House, and why his bereaved 
acquaintance cuts him on the street ever since the funeral. 

While every other man you meet is suffering from rheumatism 
occasioned by wet feet, the following recipe to guard against cold during 
the winter, will be eagerly read by thousands : Go to any drug store and 
buy ten cents worth of common— of common — well, never mind the name, 
the druggist will know what you want — then muffle up your mouth well 
and drink it just as hot as you can swallow it. Be careful to avoid 
draughts, exposure, and fleas in street cars, by staying at home until the 
fine weather sets in, and— well, ask the family physician, he'll tell you 
the rest. 

Musical criticism is not our specialty, but as the plutocrat proprietor 
of this paper insists on our giving an account of the recent orchestral 
matinee, we have only to remark that if the violins had simultaneously 
been afflicted with the itch, they couldn't have been scratched more dili- 
gentl}', while we never heard more beautiful horn playing since we blew 
our nose for a bet that it would be heard a block oft. If we can't write 
up a concert, at all events we can drink just as often as we are invited to, 
as well as a professional musical and dramatic critic, which is saying 
a great deal. 

There was only one man knocked down and run over by a hack this 
week, and he wasn't hurt much. If this sort of thing is allowed to con- 
tinue, we may as well at once give up all claim to having the most careless 
and insolent hackmeu in the States — a distinction which we have long 
enjoyed. It is feared, as Mr. Pickering would say, that new men have 
been admitted into the ranks of the drivers who are not imbued with the 
spirit or the ambition of their predecessors, or words to that effect. 

The latest chemical discovery is to the effect that a solution of bi- 
carbonate of sodium applied to burns takes away all pain. This accounts 
for the great rise in the price of the article. Every one who dies nowa- 
days utters a last request that his remains may be wrapped up in a suffi- 
cient quantity of the preparation to last him through a reasonable eter- 
nity. This deprives cremation of all its horrors. 

If Archbishop Alemany does not call off his troops — we mean his 
priests — and stop praying for rain, the State will shortly indict him as a 
nuisance. He put on his whole force until the number of the petitioners 
kicked up such a din at the celestial portals that we are nearly drowned 
out. If he does not turn on his sacerdotal stop-cock, we shall commence 
constructing a copper-bottomed ark right away. 

When an Oregon man is tired of life he comes down to San Fran- 
cisco, goes into a saloon on the city front, and exhibits, in a careless way, 
two or three twenty-dollar rolls. When fished out of the bay three weeks 
afterwards, it is usually impossible to identify him, an inquest having 
previously been held by the crabs, and his sins as well as his underclothes 
being thoroughly washed out. 

We have carefully added up the lists of all the persons who have 
signed the temperance pledge in this city since the first of the month. 
According to the religious papers the number is 684,329, including Happy 
Jack and two melodeon performers. Out of a population of 300,000 peo- 
ple, this is a fair result, and indicates considerable activity on the part of 
the revivalists. 

Henry Ward Beecher has just been appointed Chaplain to a New 
York regiment. His duties will consist in converting all the brass cannon 
into breech-loaders, and firing a semi-annual volley of Christianity at the 
troops. This is the first instance of his being connected with any asso- 
ciation to which ladies do not belong. 

Under the heading, "Woman and Labor," the Chronicle yesterday 
says of Miss Drake, the lecturess, that she is a person of graceful move- 
ment and easy delivery. This thing of employing medical students as re- 
porters is simply shocking. 

On New Year's Day the Queen of England distributed one and a 
half tons of beef to eight hundred poor persons of Windsor. Every one 
all round smiled and looked happy — that is, except the cows. 

King Alfonso the Twelfth has just married an "Infanta." Wouldn't 
he like to be a common citizen of the United States, so that he could 
have married a big girl? 

Over in Alameda they allow infants to amuse themselves with loaded 
guns, and the child never even gets scolded — only blown up. 

The Cooks' Anti-Coolie Association are determined to agitate until 
there shall not be a cue seen in the cuisine as it were. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Jan. 26, 1878. 



A GLIMPSE OP YOUTH. 

Maiden, I thank thee for thy face, 

Thy sweet, shy glance of conscious eyes; 
For, from thy beauty and thy grace, 

My life has won a glad surprise. 
I met thee on the crowded street — 

A load of care on heart and brain — 
And, for a moment, bright and fleet, 

The vision made me young again. 
And then I thought, as on I went, 

And. struggled through the thronging ways, 
How every age's complement 

The age that follows overlays. 

The youth upon the child shuts down ; 

Young manhood closes over youth; 
An d ripe old age is but the crown 

That keeps them both in changeless truth. 
So, every little child I see, 

With brow and spirit uudefiled, 
And simple faith and frolic glee, 

Finds still in me another child. 
Toward every brave and careless boy 

Whose lusty shout or call I hear, 
The boy within me springs with joy 

And rings an echo to its cheer! 
What was it, when thy face I saw, 

That moved my spirit like a breeze, 
Responsive to the primal law 

Of youth's entrant-ins harmonies? 
Ah! little maid — so sweet and shy — 

Building each day thy fair romance — 
Thou didst not dream a youth passed by, 

When I returned thee glance for glance! 
For all my youth is still my own, 

Bound in the volume of my age, — 
And breath from thee hath only blown 

The leaves back to the golden page ! 

— Scribnerfor January. 

A SINGULAR CASE. 

A woman aged 6fty-eight, named Margaret 
Edwards, was recently charged at the Lambeth 
(London) police court last week with refusing to 
perform the task allotted to her as an inmate of 
Lambeth workhouse. According to the state- 
ment of the task-mistress the prisoner had de- 
clined to dust some windows in a room two days 
ago, and was therefore "ordered to be punished." 
The prisoner in defense addressed the magistrate 
as follows: "Yes, I was put in the cell as it 
is called, and had nothing but bread and cold 
water for two days. It was not to dust windows, 
but clean them ; and as I suffered from giddiness 
in the head I was afraid to get up to reach the 
windows. Y<m don't know, your worship, how 
paupers are treated, and I often think it a pity 
the Almighty does not relieve some of us, so as 
to save us from a workhouse. I have seen bet- 
ter days, and lost my last home through illness. 
Inmates as old as myself are set to clean the 
long stone passages, the doors on either side be- 
ing left open so as to subject the poor people to 
a thorough draught. They have to stop from 
twelve o'clock to one o'clock in a room where the 
flooring has been washed over, and without a 
spark of fire in the grates. This is uuder the di- 
rection of the Local Government Board. When 
I said that I could not not do the work, I was 
taunted by the master that if I did not I should 
have my dinner in prison, at Christmas." The 
task-mistress said that this latter statement, and 
" nearly all " uttered by the prisoner, was untrue. 
The prisoner, however, declared that she had 
stated nothing but the truth, and in the end the 
magistrate discharged her on her promising to 
do the work she was required to perform. That 
paupers occasionally are "troublesome" is very 
probable, but, on the other hand, the numerous 
complaints made by them of the imperfection 
of the labor arrangements of workhouses and of 
the hardships inflicted upon them by the officials 
of these institutions point to the necessity of in- 
vestigation into their alleged grievances. — Pall 
Mall Budget 

The Lancet, discussing "The Drink Ques- 
tion," gives the following formal judgment: Al- 
cohol in any shape or form should never be taken 
except at meals, and, we believe, preferably at 
only one meal in the day. The habit of drink- 
ing in the forenoon is pernicious in the extreme, 
and in our opinion wine or beer is best avoided 
at luncheon. In quality there are two things to 
be considered, combination and dilution of the 
alcohol, and digestibility of the liquor. That 
natural light wines and light ales are better, when 
they do not disturb digestion by their other in- 
gredients, than alcohol every one will admit, and, 
where these disagree, recourse must be had to 
stronger liquor diluted. In the opinion of many 
foreign authorities much of the evil of drinking 
in England is due to the fiery and potent nature 
of our habitual drinks. As to quality, it is far 



more difficult to lay down any rule, for that which 
may be taken with benefit by one person, or at 
one time, may injure at another. The quantity 
which is usually taken at a dinner party would, 
if taken habitually, be undoubted excess. For 
young and active men a glass of beer, or one or 
two glasses of claret, at dinner, we believe, an 
ample supply; while men of middle age may with 
advantage "stop at the third glass " of claret, 
sherry, or port, and fear no ill result. But be- 
yond such general injunctions the infinite variety 
of constitution, habit, and digestion would make 
any detailed prescription worthless. The ulti- 
mate test in every case must be experience, and 
until men have enough moral control and discre- 
tion to limit their drinking to that which they 
absolutely require, all direction and rebuke will 
be thrown away. — Overland Mail. 



A young man named Beaumont came to 
a terrible death, recently, while playing a game 
of football in Walkley, Eng., in which there are 
several deep quarries, and the field in which the 
match was played was at the edge of one of them. 
Beaumont was either unaware of this, or in the 
excitement of the game he forgot it, for on the 
ball being kicked over the wall he jumped over 
at once headlong into the quarry below, a dis- 
tance of perhaps thirty or forty feet. A fractured 
skull, both legs broken, aod a fractured arm were 
among the injuries he sustained. 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD. 

NORTHERN DIVISION. 

WINTER ARRANGEMENT. 

ClominimciiEg- Monday, Oct. 23d, 1S77, 
J Passenger Trains will leav« San Francisco from Pas- 
senger Depot on Towusend street, between Third and 
Fourth streets, as follows : 

8 0A a.m (daily) for San Jose, Gilroy, Hollister, Tres 
. O VJ pinos, Pajaro, Salinas. Soledad and all Way 
Stations, making Stage connections at San Mateo for 
Half Moon Bay and Pescadero; at Redwood for Wood- 
side, SearsvUle and Peseadern ; at San Jose for Los 
Gatos and Lexington ; at Gilroy for Los Banos and Fire- 
baugh's ; at Sargent's for San Juan and Natividad ; at 
Soledad for Paraiso Springs, Paso Rubles Hot Springs, 
San Luis Obispo, Guadalupe, Santa Barbara, San Buen- 
aventura and Los Angeles. 

6^" At PAJARO connects witb the Santa Cruz Rail- 
road forApros and Santa Cruz. 



11.25 



. M. (daily) forMenlo Park and Way Sta- 
tions. 



Q OXp.m. daily (Sundays excepted) for San Jose, 
tJ.^<J Gilroy and Way stations. 



4- 4-0 P " M " (d a ''y) for S an J° se an( i Way Stations. 
U OA p.m. (daily) for Mc-nlo Park and Way Stations. 



£3f° Extra train on Sundays discontinued. 

A. C. BASSGTT, Superintendent. 
H. R. JUDAH, Assistant Passenger and Ticket Agent. 

SOVTHERX DIVISIONS. 

£3^~ Passengers for points on the Southern Divisions 
of the road will take the ears of the Centra] Pacific Rail- 
road via OAKLAND, leaving SAN FRANCISCO via Ferry 
Landing, Market street, at 4:00 p.m. daily, and making 
close connection at GOSHEN for Sumner, Mojave, Los 
Angeles, Wilmington, Anaheim, Colton & Colorado River. 



C. P. R. R. 



Commencing Wednesday, Jan. 9, 1878, and until 
further notice, Trains and Boats will Leave S. F: 

Overland Ticket Office, at Ferry Landing, Market street. 



7 00 A " JI " ( dai1 ^' Vallejo Steamer (from Market 
• 'VX/ Street Landing — Connecting witb Trains for 
Napa (Stages for Sonoma), Calistoga (the Geysers), 
Woodland, Williams, Knight's Landing and Sacramento. 
(Sunda3's excepted) for Woodland, Williams and 
Knight's Landing. (Arrive San Francisco S:10 P.M.) 



Q fjA A.M. (daily), Atlantic Express Train (via Oak- 
u.\J\J j am i Ferry) for Sacramento, Marysville, Red- 
ding, Portland (Or.), Colfax, Reno (Virginia City), Pali- 
sade (Eureka), Ogden and Omaha. Connects "at Gait 
with train arriving at lone at 3:40 p.m. 

(Arrive San Francisco 5:35 p.m.) 



Q QA A.M. (Sundays excepted) Northern Railway Lo- 
^•" , -' cal Passenger Train to San Pablo and Martinez. 
(Arrive San Francisco 3:35 p.m.) 



3AA P.M. (daily)San Jose Passenger Train (via Oak- 
• \J\J land Ferry), stopping at all Way Stations. Ar- 
rives at San Jose at 5:30 p.m. 
(Arrive San Francisco 9:35 A.M.) 



Q QA P.M. (daily) Northern Railway Local Passenger 
<J-<J\J Train to San Pablo and Martinez. 

(Arrive San Francisco 9:35 A.M.) 



4f\f\ P.M. (daily) Express Train (via Oakland Ferry), 
t \J\J for Lathrop, Stockton, Merced, Visalia, Sum- 
ner, Mojave, Newhall, San Buenaventura, Santa Barbara- 
Los Angeles, "Santa Monica," Wilmington, Santa Ana, 
San Diego, Colton and Yuma (Arizona Stages and Colo, 



rado River Steamers). Connects at Niles with train ar- 
riving at San Jose at 0:55 p.m. " Sleeping Cars " between 
Oakland, Los Angeles and Yuma. 

(Arrive San Franuiseo 12:40 P.M.) 

A A A P. M. (Sundays excepted) Vallejo Steamer (from 
~^*yJ\J Market Street Landing), connecting with trains 
for Calistoga, (ths Geysers), Woodland, Knight's Land- 
ing and Sacramento; and at Sacramento with Passen- 
ger Train, lea^ig at 9:15 p.m. on Tuesdays, Thursdays 
and Saturday™ wily, for Truekee, Reno, Carson and 
Virginia City. " Sleeping Cars " between Vallejo and 
Carson. (Arrive San Francisco 11:10 a.m.) 

4AA P.M. (Sundays excepted) Sacramento Steamer 
,\JkJ (from Wash'n St. Wharf), for Beniciaand Land- 
ings on the Sacramento River; also, taking the third class 
overland passengers to connect with train leaving Sacra- 
mento a t 9:00 a.m., daily. (Arrive San Francisco 8:00 r.M. 

4 A P.M. (daily), Through Third Class and Acconi- 
• Ou modation Train, via Lathrop and Mohave, 
arriving at Los Angeles on second day at 11:55 a.m. 

(Arrive San Francisco 7:30 a.m. 



FERRIES AND LOCAL TRAINS. 



From "SAN FRAJTCISCO," Daily. 




East Oakland 



I A ti.10 1 DAILY 

10 P 11.45 > SUNDAYS -. 

1 *11.45 ) EXCEPTED ( 



Change Cars 

at 
West O'kland 



A 6.10 
00 



*10.30 p.m. Sundays only to Alameda. 
To FERNSIDE— except Sundays — 7.00, 9.00, 10.00 
A.M. , and 5 p.m. 
To SAN JOSE— Daily— 10:30 A.M., 3:00, 4:00 p.m. 



To " SAJT 1" KAN CISCO," Daily. 


U 

H S S 


a 

HO 
tr- 


> 

Is 

D 


a, 

WW 

5s 

03" 


■ ^2 

PS. 


O 

a^~ 
a 


FROM 

OAKLAND. 
(Broadway.) 


A S.00 
10.00 

p 3.00 
4.30 
5.30 


A 7.30 
8.30 
9.30 
10.30 
1130 
P 1.00 
4.00 


A'0.25 
7.00 
8.03 
9.00 
10.03 
11.03 
12,00 
P 1.00 
3.00 


AtC. 45 

7.55 

11.15 

tll.45 

p 3.40 


At7.08 

8.15 

11.35 

Ptl208 

4.03 

t4.45 


A G.40 
7.40 
8.40 
9.40 
10.40 
11.40 


A 0.50 
7.20 
7.50 
8.25 
8.50 
9.20 


p 2.50 
3.20 
3.50 
4.20 
4.50 
5.20 
5.50 






1.25, 10.20 
2.401 10.50 
4.401 11.20 
5.40 11.50 
6.40P12.20 
7.50 12 50 
9.001 1.20 
10.101 1.50 


6.25 


I 6.00 






6.50 






^ y 


4.00 
5.00 
6.03 

no. oo 


y 




Change Cars 

at 
West Oaklnd. 


tChange Cars 

at 
East Oakland 


10.20 


A 6.30 


A 5.40 


A" 5. 00 
*5.40 

r*7.20 
'8.30 


1 ( A 5.10;a 5.20 


















) EXCP 


PTED ' 


' 





From FERNSIDE-except Sundays— 6.00, 10.00, 11.00 

A.M., and 6.00 p.m. 

FROM SAN JOSE— Daily— 7:05 and 8:10 A.M. 

♦Alameda Passengers change cars at Oakland. 

A— Morning, p — Afternoon. 



The Creek Ferry Boat will ltn» Daily: 

From SAN FRANCISCO, at 7:15 and 9:45 a.m , 12:15, 
2:25, and 4:10 P.M. 

From OAKLAND, at 8:15, and 10:45 A.M., 1:15, 3:15 
and 5:00 P.M. 



"Official Schedule Time" furnished by Anderson & 
Randolph, Jewelers, 101 and 103 Montgomery St., S. F. 
T. H. GOODJLVN, Gen. Pass, and Ticket Agt. 
A. N. Towne, General Superintendent. 



CUNA.BD LINE. 

British ami Worth American Royal 
Mail Steamships between NEW YORK and LIV- 
ERPOOL, calling at O.UEENSTOWN. 
Sailing from New York every Wednesday 

ABYSSINIA Jan. 2d, Feb. 6th 

SCYTHIA Jan. 23d, Feb. 27th 

PARTIIIA Jan. 9th, Feb. 13th 

ALGERIA 

BOTHNIA 

CHINA Jan. 16th, Feb 20th 

BAT A VI A January 30th 

Passage can be secured and all information given on 
application to 



Jan. 5. 



WILLIAMS, BLANCHARD & CO., 
218 California st. 



Jan. 2f., 1878. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



11 



Notabilia. 



fjiilur- or ilttiil 



1 like 

i with 

iiiftll, and she 

Wlit'Il tttllil liiiuli- up, she 

nml it 

:. r.l>ll:illH-l t.'-hoW 

it'l ■ beautiful boy 

vtn to all I'll, 
v. here there are DO 
tful the subject. 



A lellow was being (fanned by a fcrademnn for the price of a pair of 

Ihe fellow's ■ child. "No, I 

Limed he, "sun's I stand lure I haven't ffot a cent of 

Anil bringing down his hand on the Bide of his Leg 

, lie all unintentionally awoke to the echo the sluw- 

I half-dollars in his trowsere pocket. Then, as 

nto his eye, he wildly fled, while I , '• "Silver 

will be the ruin "f thi> country yet." Smith never Btopped running until 

tied F. A P. J. Casein's, where he hastily drank his usual courage 

:N PLANTATION W1113KY. 



Many people put up a fancy sign in their parlors asking God to bless 
their homes, ami then they themselves do all tney tan to curse it. 

A man of sagacity, beii of b serious quarrel between two 

of his female relations, asked the persons if in their quarrels either had 

called the other "old or " withered." On receiving an answer in the neg- 
ative, " O, then, 1 Bnall make up the quarrel." He invited them both to 
supper at Swain B, ;it 213 Sutter street, and they knew how good a time 
was in store for them, they both went. They became cheerful and 
happy, forgot their petty little quarrel, in which neither was really treated 
t" the only unpardonable epithets. The delicacies at Swain's are all the 
talk. It is unquestionably the family restaurant par excellence of the city. 

A gentleman in England committed suicide, the other day, and left 
a paper stating that he did so because his wife was a great deal too good 
for him. That's why the jury returned a verdict recording their opinion 
that the deceased was of sane mind. If he had broken the heart of one 
1 the like with the second, and yet continued to live, 
there then need have been no doubt of his moral insanity, just as there is 
Qodoul - Valley isfull of ugliness, nastiness and beastliness, 

and n. urifying by a Carbon SUicatcd Filter, soldonly by Bush 

ft Milne, ;v street, under the Grand. 

Many a man who thinks he carries a great enterprise on his shoulders 
is simply round shouldered by carrying a big load of self-conceit. 

It was a city man who, after having had a doctor sew on a piece of 
his ear that had been bitten off in a fight, went off humming, " Thou art 
sown ear and yet so far." He meant the nearness, in point of time, of 
isperity of three years ago, and its farness in being forevermore be- 
yond reach, but happy, thrice happy, is the man who, with a clear con- 
BCience, a well-balanced brain, and a bright hope of an hereafter, eats in 
contentment, and does it at Emerson Corville's, 413 Pine street, where 
the Red Cross Brand of Salmon is alone obtainable. 



Boots of the thirteenth century are occasionally dug up in London, 
with skeletons of cats of the same festive era. The relative positions of 
the boots and cats show that the ancients were not much better at aiming 
than we of to-day are. Our Notahilia man, however, always aims well. 
Ask those he fires his jokes off at; above all, inquire of his patrons, on 
whose behalf he fires them off. J?. S. Chadbourne, at 7'27 Market street, 
for instance, will tell you how much he owes to this medium of advertis- 
ing. He sells furniture, bed-room and parlor sets, lounges, etc. 



A prison-keeper rejoices in the name of Melody. Sing Sing would 
be a good place for him to labor. 

Cornelius J. Vanderbilt testified in open court : "I would rather be 
considered a d— d rascal than a lunatic." This is another illustration of 
the universal desire of men to be considered something else than what 
they really are. That's why " a moral idiot '' is the worst name you can. 
apply to the fellow whom it so exactly fits. But if you would always ap- 
ply the right name to the right thing, say that there is no cooking range 
equal to that of De La Montanya, Jackson street, below Battery. 

' 'I can't play this sonata ; it's too hard," said a young piano pupil 
fretfully to her teacher. " But you must," replied he, "sonata wore 1 
more about it." She set to work with a will, conquered that difficulty, 
and is now a skilled pianist, but she uses only the Hallet & Davis Piano. 



Star actors may be the lights of the stage, but they are not like can- 
dles, because a puff for one puts another out. 

" At what age were you married?" asked she, inquisitively. But 
the other lady was equal to the emergency, and quickly responded, ".At 
the parsonage." Her wits had been brightened by tierke Wine, which 
her husband procured for her at Landsberger's, 10 and 12 Jones Alley. 

A corset manufacturer puts his name on each piece of goods made. 
Thus it is that advertising does now and then go to waist. It never does 
if inserted in these columns, where, however, it is very liable to create a 
bustle. O, after that double, revise me, give me Napa Soiu ! 

Some men are good because goodness pays best ; some are good for 

nothing. 

Muller's Glasses are the best. He is a scientific optician, who knows 
how to measure his glasses to suit all eyes. 

An Iowa groom fished a knife and Jew's-harp from his vest pocket 
before he found the wedding ring. 



1.000 SHAKES OF STOCK IN THE PHGE.Y IX GOLD MINE FOR SALE. 

'■*ti. Mine I* IOC«t«ll lO Auinilitr OOUnty, Oil., on lhr uroul 

X ii. 

. . ■ ;., ,|..,. 
i in i-" the pa I 
I uld payS 
, . • .■ . mo dob) Oaptl -i 91" ck, 
proprietor, Mr A II.'. 
in.il j.nr ! It tO bim, "ii nim I ■ ■ 

and 10pa 

■ ■ I Hwchui i ■■ h ui ■ ■ Banh I I <■■'. I pox share. 

Hot. 17.1 fowly H ■' ■ 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The Gorman Savin;?* and rouai Society.— For the half year 
ond ■ I ■ ■ ■ ; 1 ol i reotoi ol the German Savings and Loan So- 

ld on Term Deposits al the rate of eight and two-fifths 
r oenl per annum, and on < Inlinary Deposits at 1 1 1 ■_ ■ rate of seven (7) pur 
i annum, free From Fedora! Taxes, and payable on and after the 16th day of 
January, 1878. By order, GEORGE LETTE, Secretary. 

.Sun Francisco, December 81, 1877. Jan, r>. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

San FranclHCO Saving* Union, 5:12 California, street, comer 
Webb.- For the half year ending with December 31st, 1877, a dividend has been 
■ al the rate ol eight and oni -tenth (8-1-10) par cant, per annum on Term De- 
and six and three- fourths (of) per cent, on Ordinary Deposits, free ol Federal 
Tax, payable on and after Tuesday, January 15th, 1878. 

Dec. 20. LO V EL L WHITE, Cashier. 

STOCKHOLDERS' MEETING. 

Oilier of the Sulphur Bank Quicksilver Mining- Company.- 
An adjourned meeting: of the stockholders of the Sulphur Bank Quicksilver 
Mining Company wilt be held at the office of the Company, No. 220 Sansome street, 
iu the city of San Francisco, MONDAY, February ath, at 2 o'clock p.m., for the pur- 
pose of electing a Board of Directors, and for the transaction of any other business 
which may he brought up. LUC1EN HERMANN, Secretary. 

San Francisco, January 2d, 1S7S. Jan. 5. 

SILVER KING NORTH MINING COMPANY, 

Pinal County, Arizona. 

Office: Room 36, No. 330 Pine St. (Academy Building-), S. F. 

[August IS. J 

IN CONSEQUENCE OF SPURIOUS IMITATIONS™ 

Of tEA A PERRIES' SAl'CE, which are calculated to de- 
ceive the public, UlAAXit PERKINS have adopted A NEW LABEL 
BEARING THEIR SIGNATURE, LEA & PERKINS, which is placed on every bottle 
of WORCESTERSHIRE SAUCE, and without which none is genuine. 

Ask fur LEA & PERRINS' Sauce, and see name on wrapper, lahel, bottle and stop- 
per. Wholesale and for export by the proprietors, Worcester ; Crosse & lilaekwell, 
London, etc., etc., and by grocers and oilmen throughout the world. To be obtained of 
Dec. 1. MESSRS. CROSS & CO., San Francisco. 

BRITISH BENEVOLENT SOCIETY OF CALIFORNIA. 

Attendance, daily, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., by the under- 
signed, to receive subscriptions and donations, and to furnish all information 
relating to the Society. J. P. McCURRIE, Secretary, 

Oct. H3. 730 Montgomery street. 



Wm. Irvine.] 



IRVINE & LE BRETON, 



Attorneys and Counselors at taw, No. 
street, Astor Block, San Francisco. 



) 6^ PRINTS "®a 

BRUCE, j-537 SACHAMENTO STBEET, 



BELOW MONTGOMERY. 



[A. J. Le Breton. 
631 Sacramento 

lyl4. 



W. Morris. Jos. Schwab. J. F. Kennedy, 

MORRIS, SCHWAB & CO., 

Importers and I>ealers in moldings, Frames, Engraving's, 
OhromoH, Lithographs, Decalcomanie, Wax and Artists' Materials, 21 Post 
street, nearly opposite Masonic Temple, San Francisco. Feb. 4. 

F. C. Snow.] SNOW & MAY'S ART GALLERY. [W. B. May. 

SNOW A MAY, 

IMPORTERS AND MANUFACTURERS OF 

Pictures, Frames, Moldings, and Artists* Materials. 

21 Kearny St., near Market, S. F. Dec. 19. 



REMOVED. 

T lie Old Established Steam O as Fitting and Plumbing Es- 
tablishments J. K. PRIOR has been removed from 730 Montgomery street to 
his new five-story-and-a-basement building, NO. 1128 MARKET STREET and 21 
TURK STREET, where a complete assortment of new patterns of Gas Fixtures and 
Plumbing Material are offered at greatly redueed rates. Messages sent by American 
District Telegraph Company free. All jobbing promptly attended to. Established 
1852. [July 28.] J. K. PRIOR. 

THOMAS DAY, 122 AND 124 SUTTER STREET. 

Gas Fixtures, Clocks, Bronzes and Holiday Specialties, in- 
cluding Fan Fire Screens, Brass Andirons and Candlesticks, and a choice selec- 
tion of Bisc Ware. Dec. S. 

ALMEH, 

A Painting by If. Hujupnrey Moore, now on view at Snow 
& MAY'S ART GALLERY, daily, from 9 to 9. Dec. 8. 



NOBLE & GALLAGHER, 

Importers and Dealers in Painters" Materials, House, Sign 
and Fresco Painters, Plain and Decorative Paper-Hangers and Glaziers, No. 438 
Jackson street, between Montgomery and Sansome, San Francisco. Ceilings and 

Walls Kalsomiued and Colored. Jobbing promptly attended to. May 1?. 

Ch~| k}i\{\ Salary. Permanent salesmen wanted to sell 

sPJ_.-'£'Vl'VF Staple Goods to dealers. No peddling. Expenses paid. Address 
Sept. 1.] S. A. GRANT &, CO., 2, 4, (j and S Home St., Cincinnati, O. 

Business legitimate. 



$2500' 



Particulars fr^e. Address 



J. WORTH & CO., St. Louis, Mo. 



£NOCold Plated Watches. Cheapest in the known world. 

H&O SampU Watch Free to Agent*. Address 
Sept. 1.] A. COULTER & CO., Chicago. 

CHARLES LE UAY, 
American Commission Merchant, - - 1 Kne Scribe, Paris. 



12 



SANT FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Jan. 26, 1878. 



THE WOBKINGMEN'S DISTRESS. 

The public are greatly indebted to the railroad authorities for pro- 
viding work for the distressed workingmen ; and the number of applica- 
tions at the Putrero is a sufficient evidence that the offer of one dollar was 
well timed. It will be interesting to watch the results of this novel at- 
tempt to unite philanthropy with business, and we may hope that the 
railroad authorities will not be losers. 

Considerable misapprehension exists as to the causes of the present 
stagnation of this labor market, and, without in the least depreciating the 
importance of Chinese competition, it may be well to draw attention to 
other influences which have as much to do with the result. 

As a preliminary, we may observe that the springs of human produc- 
tive industry are perennial and inexhaustible. No one doubts that there 
i ! work enough to do, and that the world affords abundant scope for hu- 
man energies for ages yet to come. Whilst a single person lacks food, 
raiment and shelter ; whilst any reasonable want remains ungratified, it 
cannot be said that we have all we want, and every day with the advance 
of civilization more wants increase. For the production and utilization 
of the gifts of Nature capital and labor must be harmoniously employed. 
Neither can do without the other. So long as both are free, we may rest 
satisfied that capital will seek its rewards exactly where labor receives its 
most remunerative wage. Whilst, if the freedom of eicher is impaired, 
disagreement and injustice will certaiuly arise between employers and 
employed ; trade will languish, capital will disappear, and the laborers 
will starve for want of work. 

In considering the causes of the distress amongst the workingmen of 
California, it must be observed that they are only suffering with their 
fellows throughout the world at large. Throughout Europe there is com- 
X->lete stagnation. In England there were nearly two hundred strikes last 
year, embracing every form of industry and intended to prevent the re- 
duction of wages. At the same time, millions of capital were lying idle 
in the bankers' vaults. In the Eastern States matters are no better. In 
New York the business failures are numerous, real estate has fallen in 
value, and the laboring population are suffering great hardships. In the 
more Western States thousands are working for Chinese wages and are 
glad to get them. And the wonder is, not that the laborers of California 
are in want of work, but that they should have been employed so long 
and still have maintained a higher rate of wages than prevailed else- 
where. The fact that they have done so speaks volumes for the resources 
of the State, and attests the exceptional value of its productions during 
the last four years. 

But, now the crash has come, every one is ready to put the blame on 
some one else. The laborer who has been too thriftless to become a 
capitalist complains of monopoly, and the idle attributes his misfortunes 
to the competition of -the industrious Chinese, whilst the capitalist grum- 
bles at being asked to employ unprofitable laborers, and finds it difficult to 
get a fair day's work for a fair day's wage. However this may be, we 
may nevertheless prove without difficulty that the present distress is pro- 
duced by a variety of causes — economic, physical, moral, social, political, 
and legislative — all interfering with the freedom and interdependence of 
labor and capital, and with what should otherwise be the normal course 
of trade. 

First, then, a vast number of immigrants have been attracted to Cali- 
fornia by high wages and general prosperity, especially from places in 
which the commercial depression was severely felt. The population of 
San Francisco and the State has grown with a rapidity out of all propor- 
tion to its possibilities of development. From Europe generally and 
from Great Britain in particular, from Eastern cities and the West- 
ern States, have lately come a large number of energetic work- 
ers without much capital. These men are prepared to accept less 
than the Californian rate of wages. We hear of strong young fel- 
lows willing to work for $20 a month and board. We know of clerks in 
this city working for $35 and £40 a month, finding themselves, all the 
while acknowledging that the terms are better than in Missouri. This 
immigration has greatly helped to glut the labor market, already para- 
lyzed by the dry season and bad harvest. Indeed, the facilities of modern 
travel must equalize wages over the entire continent, and if so, those in 
California will probably fall to the Missouri level. But in this new con- 
test the elder Californiaus suffer from some serious disadvantages. In 
early days the Californian laborer represented the select energy and phys- 
ical ability of the human race. The weakly were weeded out by hard- 
ships and the fools by wit. But this energy has been, to a considerable 
extent, used up, and for some years California has become the resort of 
the broken-down in credit, character and health. So long as the demand 
for labor was brisk, these persons readily found subsistence, but in face of 
younger and better men they were at once squeezed out. Again, the older 
Californian cannot forget the days when he was paid in unmeasured gold- 
dust. He then lost his conception of the value of money, and has ever 
since judged wages rather by their amount than by their power of pur- 
chase. Thriftless and extravagant, he still overestimates the value of his 
services, and decries reductions, however just and necessary. Many men 
have also been demoralized by temporary wealth. They acquired when 
rich habits which unfitted them for work, and made them drags upon the 
wheels of labor. Nor are Californian habits conducive to successful com- 
petition and the maintenance of high wages. Men spend their earnings 
in saloons and gambling dens. Hence they deteriorate rapidly in health 
and strength, and so reduce the amount of labor rendered for a given wage. 
Employers soon discriminate, wages are lowered, the old and weak dis- 
charged, helping to swell the ranks of unemployed. So then when the de- 
mand for labor is greatly in excess, everything goes well, even hoodlums are 
found work. But on the first disturbance of the course of trade, either 
in Europe or America, new elements step in. Laborers migrate — compe- 
tition grows fierce. The idle and saucy are discharged. The weak and 
worthless are crowded out. Discontent generates agitation. Public 
peace is endangered. Capital becomes alarmed. Confidence is destroyed, 
and at length the strong and healthy suffer with the weak. These cir- 
cumstances influence the condition of the laborer as much as Chinese 
competition, whilst there are others, political and legislative, of still 
greater import, to which we may refer next week. 

St John's Presbyterian Church, Post street, between Mason and 
Taylor streets. — The Rev. Dr. Babb, editor of the Occident, will preach 
at 11 a. M., as the pastor, Rev. Dr. Scott, is to preach at that hour in the 
Howard Presbyterian Church, Mission street. The Rev. D. Scott will 
lecture at 7i o'clock in his own pulpit. At 6^ o'clock there willbe a Praise 
Service, to which all are cordially invited. 



II A MARVELOUS CURE. 

An instance of a most remarkable case, published in the Courier de 
San Francisco of the 16th instant, has just been brought under our no- 
tice. Below we give a translation of the article, the truth of which is at- 
tested by the valuable signatures at its foot. The testimony of the re- 
spected ladies whose names are appended, in addition to that of the French 
priest, Dr. Stewart, of the Royal College of Surgeons, England, Dr. 
Wiss and others, sets at rest all doubts which might have existed as to the 
genuineness of this most wonderful triumph of the healing art. We 
call attention, also, to the sworn statement of Mr. Henry Thompson, At- 
torney-at-Law, which is also subjoined : 

A Remarkable Cure. 

To thcEditor of the Courier — SlR: Among the diseases difficult of cure, 
which are, unhappily, too numerous, affections of the skin of an inveter- 
ate character figure very prominently. Under this head, it appears tons 
worthy of noticing and making known a very remarkable cure of one of 
the most serious cases of an old cutaneous disease, which has just been ef- 
fected in San Francisco through the skill of a physician practicing exten- 
sively among our French residents, and attested by the undersigned wit- 
nesses. About seven months ago Dr. .Bechtinger, Attendant Physician 
of the French Mutual Benevolent Society, was invited by a member of 
the French Ladies* Benevolent Committee to visit a sick woman who had 
no other means of support except those afforded her by this Committee. 
Several years since, this unhappy woman found herself separated from the 
world, obliged to keep her room and a perpetual prey to the most incred- 
ible sufferings. Her whole body was covered with numberless and deep 
sores. An affection, somewhat analagous to leprosy and elephantiasis, but 
without having the distinct characteristics of these terrible maladies, one 
which has been observed prevalent among the Chinese arrivals at Peru, 
had attacked her in that country and reduced her to this extremity. The 
Peruvian doctors who attended her were unable to combat the disease, 
and considered her incurable. At last they advised her to go to California. 
No less than seventeen physicians, each with a different mode of treat- 
ment, endeavored in their turn to give her relief, but with the same 
negative result. Just at the time when they were preparing to convey 
her as an incurable to the City and County Hospital, Dr. Bechtinger, 
who is quite an expert in diseases of the skin, undertook to treat her 
gratuitously, with a devotion and philanthrophy eminently worthy of the 
success which has since crowned his indefatigable efforts. Those who had 
the opportunity of seeing Madame The'ron, now living at 1413 Dupont 
street, before her cure would not recognize her since her restoration to 
health. She is no longer the same person. Dr. Bechtinger, whose de- 
votion deserves the undoubted recognition of all parties interested, has 
the still greater satisfaction of having restored to her husband a faithful 
wife, and to her child an affectionate mother. 

The Abbe Robert. Pastor of the Church of Our Lady of Victories; 
Sister Mary B. Russell, Sister of Mercy, St. Mary's Hospital; Mrs. 
Alexander Weil; Mrs. Louise Sorbier; Mr3. Emile Pascal; Mrs. D. Koop- 
manschap; Dr. Alexander Stewart, 33 Kearny street; Dr. G. Wiss; F. 
Hassempflum, druggist; Henry Thompson, lawyer; A. P, Dietz, Superin- 
tendent of the Youths' Directory. 

San Francisco, January 15th, 1878. 

33 Kearny Street. San Francisco, January 12th, 1878. 
To ilie Editor of the Neivs Letter -Dear Sir: During the temporary absence of 
Dr. Bechtinger (four weeks from the city) I attended his patients, one of whom was 
Madame Tberon. She was suffering from a malignant disease of the foot, seriously 
affecting the bone, so much so that my opinion was that amputation would bo neces- 
sary, she being broken down and caehetis with the disease, in which opinion I was 
borne out by several physicians who saw the case before me. It was cutaneous dis- 
ease, analagous in its nature to leprosy, a disease most tedious and obstinate in its 
character to treat, requiring great skill and experience in the physician as a derma- 
tologist I consider this remarkable case one of those that present themselves only 
during the long- life practice of a medical man. It reflects great credit on Dr. 
Bechtinger for the talent, skill, and indomitable perseverance displayed by him to ef- 
fect such a cure. Thus the general, thorough knowledge of the profession evinced 
by him on several occasions, coupled with his gentlemanly demeanor, must necessa- 
rily render him a great acquisition, not only to the profession, but to the public of 
San Francisco. Very respectfully, Alexander Stewart, M.D., M.R.C.S., 

Late Surgeon in the British Army, (Crimea, etc.) 

San Francisco, July 0th, 1877. 

To Whom it may Concern: I hereby certify that I have several times seen Madame 
Theron, late of Peru, at No. 1516 Powell street, during her illness and late treatment 
by Dr. Bechtinger, and conscientiously declare that it" is my strong impression and 
conviction that the ulcerations upon the body of this lady are the same as the well- 
known sores peculiar to the lepers of the Sandwich Islands ! As a native of that 
country I had ample opportunities, during a residence there of thirty years, of ob- 
serving the appearance and spread of this destructive plague, especially among the 
aborigines of that country. Henry Tiiumi-son, Attorney-at-Law, 

No. 410 Kearney street. 

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 6th day of July, 1S77. 

[Seal.] William Harney, Notary Public. 

The rain of the past week, apart from its value in an agricultural 
point of view, has done much to aid the authorities in keeping the peace 
of the city. However much an unruly spirit may feel inclined to work 
mischief when the sun shines and the skies are bright, his evil propensi- 
ties are effectually checked under the influence of a copious rain storm. 
The number of men that hung about the Court House while the trial of 
Kearney & Co. was going on, would have been much increased if the 
elements had not come to the aid of the police. Poverty-stricken agita- 
tors are not, as a rule, given to umbrellas and water-proof coats, and with- 
out these very necessary articles those who stood on the sidewalk looking 
into the windows of the Court-room, found their situation moist and dis- 
agreeable. Rioters are not fond of wet weather, especially when unpro- 
vided with a change of clothing. The so-called workingman, who refuses 
to carry the hod when there is only a Scotch mist, does not like to build 
barricades and throw paving-stones during the prevalence of a water 
spout. No ; if we could only depend upon constant and heavy rain for a 
few weeks, the increase of the police force would become unnecessary, 
and open-air meetings would be adjourned indefinitely. 



It is said thp,t Her Imperial Highness the Empress of Austria will 
commence hunting with the Pytcbley hounds to-morrow. The Empress 
is a dashing horsewoman, and has a splendid stud of hunters. Her two 
favorite horses are said to have cost her 1,800 guineas. — Coming Events. 



Jan. 2C, 1878. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



13 



LIES OF THE DAY. 



Sacramento Lien 



■ 
riinith.il VhIcmi, tli.' " Mart- 

the ■':i"'' ilui 



itu-lo ..f the - I build- 

tive h.t!N.^— 
I 
wtation 
— — Th.it in hifl rtply to a 
l li> Kxcelloncy'a | Minion for mi accidental 
in the corridor ol the < *|>itol: " I haven't pot ■ blank in my pack* 
me down to the office vith me and I'll till one nut," Gov. Irwin 
id for nn inn ljuentin, although stranger 

hy Executives before tbi-.-^Tbat "Jimmy, 
udidate for the position o( Moral Instructor of the 
any position from the managers of thai 
— I'hat Ihe Committees visitin 

packed anytl i beer of the Lieutenant' 

able to Btore under their belts.— Thai mine 
I the Golden Eagle, in the absence of the crowd, "Oh's for another 
tlon; n heaaya he don't *'Oh (or anything. "•^^Tbat in the 
:■■■ Library Trustees the office wm seeking the candidate who 
■ being a well established f.\.^t thai i part ol 

the ''Generals " time i- taken np in dodging <itH<i;'l positions. —That in 
his visits to the Mar-- Capj I rressman Ned Marshall i 

with a shudder at his proximity to the U. S. Senatnrship in Know Noth- 
ing tini-v-.-^— That the Assembly Chaplain i* at all chagrined at the de- 
. State Library Trustee, although he was on all the tickets save 
one. " Brother Fita " is tired ol having official favors thrust upon him, 
and supplicates for a rent.— —That the oldest member ol the Assembly 
fmni San Francisco, notwithatanding the tinge of his hair ami beard, 
takes it aa a compliment to be styled a gressley frars-toe.^^That the 
youthful and Assemblyman from Solano, who runs a good 

deal on his in meant by the poet when he wrote the Line in 

Marco Boxsaris, "With arm to strike and soul to Dare." < -That Assem- 
blyman Gough rnna on the color of his beard, and Coffey on that of hi3 
hair, the tinge being hereditary with both. 

'THE NATION" ON THE ATTITUDE OP ENGLAND AND 
THE ARMED POWERS. 
It JB remarkable that, although it is well known that both Austria 
and Germany have a far heavier interest in the result of the war than 
England, and are in much closer proximity to its horrors, and have a 
much more serious appreciation of the yen tie Turk, the public in both 
these countries has remained perfectly calm, and the Governments have 
refrained from all hints as to the nature of their policy or the direction of 
their sympathies. Indeed, the dignity and self-restraint with which 
Andrassy and Prince Bismarck have looked on at what was pass- 
ing at their doom must present to Englishmen a mortifying contrast to 
the fussiness of their own Government, and the effect of this contrast 
must be aggravated by the reflection that either Andrassy or Bismarck 
could stop the war in a single week, while it is more than doubtful whether 
England could at any time since the crossing of the Danube have exerted 
any influence on it except by keeping up the spirits of the Turks; and 
yet the Turks seem to cast no blame on the Austrians or Germans. In- 
deed, it is only now— so well has Bismarck kept his counsel, and so calmly 
bus Germany looked on— that real curiosity begins to be manifested about 
his policy, or that any trustworthy indications of it begin to leak out. 
Its vague outlines, however, are now becoming discernible, and if carried 
out he will have the honor of settling the last of the great European 
problems left untouched by the treaties of 1815 ; and probably in the way 
most conducive to all the great interests of civilization. The conjectures 
aa to his aim which begin to find circulation and credit are, that he was 
only too glad to let Russia undertake the trouble and expense of putting 
an end to Turkey, and was determined from the first that she should not 
be interfered with ; and how little importance he has attached to English 
restiveness has been illustrated by his latest and not least effective mot, 
" that if Turkey is a sick man, England is a sick woman." He means, 
probably, that Russia, having completed the job satisfactorily, shall get 
her compensation in Asia and in the freedom of the Dardanelles, and that 
the debris of the Turkish Empire in Europe shall furnish in some way or 
other, perhaps in the shape of an archducal viceroyalty, an excuse for 
pushing Austria a little further down to the southeast among the Slavs, 
and giving her a chance to build up an influence or make accessions of ter- 
ritory in that direction which will make her total separation from Ger- 
many, when the time comes, easier and more acceptable. Indeed, it may 
now be almost said with certainty that he means that Austria shall do the 
main portion of the work of reorganizing European Turkey, and infusing 
political life into the populations which the peace will relieve from the 
Turkish yoke ; and if this be really his plan, the skill and patience dis- 
played in putting the cost of the enterprise on Russia can hardly be too 
much admired. 

THE LINCOLN SCHOOL. 
Editor News Letter: There are some things in the late Lincoln School 
investigation of the balcony scene which has shaken my professional con- 
ceit, as wdl as made me ashamed of our libraries. To get out of the 
knotty problem, I appeal to your astuteness in such masters for its solution. 
To be brief, it is this: Five lady teachers testified of their knowledge of 
the existence of the nuisance. Two of these were suspended for reporting 
it to the Principal; two others were left undisturbed in their positions for 
seeing it, and not reporting it, and the fifth one was dismissed from her 
position entirely for not doing what the first named two did, and for not 

. Now here is where I get stuck. What ought she to have done with 

reference to the other two who were not disturbed? or was the whole pro- 
ceeding wrong? Will you place your legal understanding on this beam? 
or would you prefer to sink it in oblivion? A LAWYER, 



Prayer for Colleges.- Srbools and Seminaries of Learning will be 
observed next Thursday evening, in St. John's Presbyterian Church {Dr. 
Scott's), and to which all lovers of education are cordially invited. 



THE WORKINGMEN'S PROGRAMME. 
The woikiiifc-meu now In ■aejato p , engaged in drawing up a pro. 

■ i arybody and evi i ■ 
already begin Ui find that It i» more easy in f.>rm good* intentions 1 1 
give them effect. La far as they have gone th 
at the following conclusions: (LI That CI p labor Isacui 

ths land. [St \ That the soil I* the heritage "f the people, and that being 
poration should own more than i :;. .,f it. 

■ the National Government shall give to the people :i system of 
finance consistent with the agricultural, manufacturing and men 
industries and requirements of the country. 14.) That the partf 
power shall be taken from the President and Governors and placed In 
the hands of a Commission, ffivj Malfeasance In office shall be punished 
by imprisonment for life, without the possibility of pardon, (6.1 The 
abolition of the contn i hi the state Prisons. (7.) All public 

by day labor, eight hours constituting a day',- work, 
(8.) That all members of the Workiogmi ball publicly and sol- 

emnly pledim themselves, henceforth to sever all connection s ith the Re- 
a and Democratic parti.'-.. To all this, we suppose, must be 
added the one plank which Senator Bones has all to himself, viz: That 

" no One person shall own more than half a million dollars. " It is, per- 

ton early to criticise the programme, as it. has not in all parts been 
finally determined upon. In very truth much of it is beneath criticism, 
but of that more anon. It i« somewhat curious that in what is, per- 
haps, the only other firmly established republic in the world, 
a somewhat similar discussion ami state of affairs prevail, 
A letter from Geneva in the Dziennik Poznanshi gives some interesting 
particulars relating to the formation of a new " Social-Democratic" party 

in Switzerland. " Hitherto, " says the Correspondent, "there have been 

many Socialists in the country, trade-unione with more or less distinctly 

marked Socialist tendencies, and even several Socialist newspapers ; but 
there has not been any Socialist organization with determinate political 
objects. The working classes were divided and consequently weak, so 
that but little attention was paid to their claims in the Federal Parlia- 
ment Last year, however, a factory bill was introduced in the Eouse 
which went aome way to remedy the grievances of the working men 
against their employers. It was violently opposed by the manufacturers, 
bankers, and other capitalists ', and this led to an' organization of la- 
bor against capital, in which the former obtained the victory. The pass- 
ing of the bill was celebrated by numerous festivals, torch-light proces- 
sions, etc., in all parts of the countrv, and last month the representatives 
of the various trade-societies, such as the Arbeiter-bund, the Arbeiter- 
union, the Urutliverein, etc., met at Berne to consider the best means of 
establishing a permanent organization of the working classes. It has 
now been decided that all these unions shall be consolidated for polit- 
ical purposes into a single party, to be called the Social- Democratic 
party of Switzerland." A programme of the new party was at the 
same time drawn up, of which the following are the chief provisions: 

1. The object of the Social-Democratic party of Switzerland is to de- 
fend and support under all circumstances the interests of workpeople. 
2. The struggle for the emancipation of the working class is not a strug- 
gle for the privileges of a caste, but for the recognition of equal rights 
and duties to all, and for the removal of any predominance of one class 
over another. 3. The financial dependence of the workman on the capi- 
talist forms the chief basis of the predominance of the latter class over the 
former, and it is therefore one of the objects of the Social-Democratic 
party to substitute for the present system of wages the system of co- 
operation. 4. The following measures will be advocated by the party as 
being likely to afford the best means of attaining its objects : (a) Direct 
legislation by the people ; (b) abolition of the Federal Council ; (c) repre- 
sentation according to numbers ; (d) appointment of unpaid judges; (e) 
every Swiss citizen to have the unconditional right of voting for candi- 
dates, or coming forward as a candidate himself, for the municipal and 
cantonal assemblies ; (/) gratuitous and secular education in the Govern- 
ment schools and universities ; (</) sanitary control of the factories and 
other places where workmen are employed ; (h) abolition of indirect taxes; 
(i) imposition of a graduated legacy duty up to 50 per cent., for the estab- 
lishment of refuges for poor children ; (j) acquisition of the railways by 
the State ; (At) abolition of fines in factories ; (i) equal results of labor, 
whether of men or of women, to be paid at the same rate ; (m) no laborer 
to be paid lower wages than are sufficient to provide means of existence. 

Food for the Hungry.— The San Francisco Benevolent Society is a 
good and useful institution. It is engaged in erecting a shed in which to 
feed the hungry. The building will be a plain shanty, about twenty feet 
by ten, fitted up with stationary tables on both sides, and, as the neces- 
sary lumber has been donated, it is expected it will be ready by Monday 
or thereabouts. The society has formed this plan in consequence of the 
numerous parties in need of food. Last week there was an average of 
150 meal tickets a day given out. These are bought by wholesale from 
the various restaurants, and distributed. This week, however, owing to 
the work in progress at the Potrero, the applicants have decreased in 
number to 75. Only such parties as are deemed worthy will be supplied 
tickets, and these will be honored at the new building, which is to be 
erected on Jackson street, corner of Montgomery avenue. Soup, bread, 
and meat will be furnished; beyond this the bill of fare will be limited. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Tbe French Savings ami Lonu Society has declared n Div- 
idend of Kight (8) per cent, per annum, free of Federal T:ix. far the half year 
ending December 31st, 1S77, payable on and after January 18th, 1878. iJv order 
Jan. 19. GUSTAVE MAI1E, Director. 

JOHN BOACH, 
athematical Instrument Maker, t*29 Montgomery street, 



Mi 
S. W, corner Sacramento, San Francisco, 
paired and carefully adjusted. 



Instruments made to order. re- 
August 26. 



T. J. PETTIT & CO.'S 

Label. Show Caril. Engraving' and Printing: Establishment, 
528 California street, San Francisco, CaL July . . 

REMOVAL. 

Abrmiis A Carroll, Importers and Wholesale I>rnggi*.ts, 
have removed to No.'a 3 and 6 Front street, corner of Market. Dec. 29. 



F 



NOTICE. 
lor the very best photographs go to Bradley A Rulofson*s, 

in an Elevator, *2D Hunt£wii< 1 1 I rect 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Jan. 26, 1878. 



Column for the Curious, 

In Nature. Science, and Art. 



A curious memento of Lord Nelson has been offered for sale at 
Christie & Mauson's, and purchased by Mr. James G-riffin, bookseller, 
the Hard, Portsmouth, England. When the admiral received his fatal 
shot at Trafalgar, eighty-four guineas, mostly of the spade ace pattern, 
were found in his purse, and these with other effects of the hero were 
sent to Mr. Alexander Davidson, Nelson's intimate friend and_ navy 
agent. Davidson had the guineas soldered together, and formed into a 
pyramidal roof, with the obverse and reverse faces alternately uppermost, 
the whole being supported at the angles on the shoulders of four full- 
length weeping females, in double metal gilt, a polished gilt ball inter- 
vening between the supports of the corners of tae roof. In the center of 
the canopy thus formed is a metal gilt miniature sarcophagus, which 
stands upon a plinth, formed of four steps, and is surrounded by a vis- 
count's coronet resting upon a cushion. The handles of the sarcophagus 
are composed of the stem and prow of an admiral's barge. The trophy, 
which is capped by a trident, bears on its front the following inscription: 
" These guineas were in Lord Viscount Nelson's purse at the time he re- 
ceived the fatal wound off Trafalgar, Oct. 21, 1805." The back and sides 
are inscribed thus: "Battle off St. Vincent, Feb. 14, 1797;" "Battle of 
the Nile, Aug. 1, 1798 j" and Battle of Copenhagen, April 2, 1801."— 
Overland Mail. 

The great feature of the racing year has been the wonderful success 
of Lord Falmouth. That one man should, eschewing handicaps, selling- 
races, and such small-deer, and devoting himself entirely to weight-for- 
age races, take upward of £35,000 in stakes alone, stamps 1877 as an annus 
mirabili* indeed. We are fond of talking about racing fortune and the 
tickle goddess, but there is something beyond mere luck on the turf* 
Lord .Falmouth is his own breeder, and his name never figures among the 
lists of purchasers of yearlings. The stud of brood mares at Mere worth 
have many of them been winners in his colors, and it is to his judgment 
that their mating is committed. The labors of a stud-farm are to him 
those of love, and his knowledge is equal to his affection. When these 
t'-"o go hand in hand, perhaps they may in some measure explain Lord 
Falmouth's success. Like the late Lord Glasgow, he cares little for hand- 
icapping, and seeks not to tread the often tortuous ways that lead to vic- 
tory here. Assisted by a trainer in the very first rank of his calling, Lord 
Falmouth, there is no doubt, possesses in Mathew Dawson an invaluable 
ally. Still, given all this, the good brood mares, the first-rate judgment, 
and the first-rate trainer, Lord Falmouth's wonderful balance-sheet 
stands out as something entirely without precedent, and not very likely 
to occur again. — World. 

The latest instance of an appeal of capital felony in which wager of 
battle was proffered, was the celebrated case of Ashford vs. Thornton, 
heard in the Court of King's Bench in 1818. It was the light of the 
widow or the heir of a murdered person to appeal the alleged murderer ; 
and William Ashford appealed Abraham Thornton of the murder of his 
sister, Mary Ashford, he being her heir. The judges were Chief Justice 
Ellenborough and Mr. Justices Abbott, Bayley, and Holroyd. Thornton 
had already been tried at the Warwick Assizes, and had been acquitted 
on the very doubtful proof of an alibi. General dissatisfaction was felt 
at the verdict in the district where the crime was committed, and the 
appeal was instigated by several influential persons in the neighborhood. 
Mr. Chitty, the eminent pleader, was counsel for the defendent, and 
under his advice he pleaded "not guilty," adding, "I am ready to defend 
the same by my body," and threw down his glove. The appellant coun- 
ter-pleaded violent presumption of the defendant's guilt. But the court, 
after hearing elaborate arguments on both sides, determined that, to use 
Lord Ellen borough's words in giving judgment, the " usual constitutional 
mode of trial must take place." The appellant did not accept the de- 
fendant's challenge, and he was consequently discharged. — Pall Mall 
Budget. 

The American art colony in Paris has been painfully affected by a 
melancholy accident which has occurred to Mr. Leland, a young painter 
of great promise. He was in his studio, Boulevard de Clichy, painting a 
picture, which he intended to send to the United States, when, during a 
moment of repose, he took from the table a small revolver, and pointed it 
to a model who was sitting to him. This last, in some alarm, observed 
that playing \vith_ firearms was dangerous, on which Mr. Leland laugh- 
ingly replied, "Not in this case, for the weapon is not loaded," and at 
the moment placing the muzzle to his forehead, he pulled the trigger. 
Unhappily, he was mistaken in his assertion, as the pistol went off, and 
the unfortunate young man fell dead on the floor. The model, in the 
greatest terror, rushed to the door and called for aid, but without utility, 
as life had fled. The deceased, who was only twenty-eight years of age, 
had exhibited several works at the Paris exhibitions. The body has been 
embalmed, and is to be sent to his relatives in the United States. — Euro- 
pean Mail. 

The gigantic whale captured in February last in the Gulf of Taranto, 
Italy,_has been subjected to a critical examination by Professor Capellini, 
who, in a report lately published, states it as his opinion that the whale 
is of a species hitherto unknown to science, and he has named it Bahena 
tarcntina, in allusion to the locality of its capture. This unlooked-for 
discovery of a new species of huge marine animal, taken in connection 
with the alleged appearance of another "monster" a short time later, 
and in the same neighborhood, as vouched for by the officers of the Royal 
yacht Osborne, is regarded as a strong argument in favor of the existence 
of unknown huge marine living objects, such as are popularly indicated 
by the name of "sea serpents." The opinion is gaining ground in Italy 
that the sea serpent of the Royal yacht was some creature usually living 
at the bottom of the sea, but disturbed by submarine volcanic phenomena. 

—Overland Mail. 

Some time ago, we gave the returns sf the number of cases of separa- 
tion de corps in France where divorce is not legal. In Belgium divorce 
exists, and the progress it has made is very remarkable. Only 4 divorces 
were decreed in 1830, 26 in 1840. 29 in 1850, 55 inlSGO, 81 in 1870, and 135 
in 1871. — World. 

At a recent sale of old wine in Bordeaux, two bottles of Chateau- 
Lante were sold to the proprietor of one of the Paris restaurants for 
3101. (£12 8s.) each. The wine was of the comet year (1811), and had 
been purchased by the seller a few years ago at the rate of £4 IGs. per 
bottle. 



REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS 

Eecorded in the City and County of Sac Francisco. California, for the 
Week ending January 23, 1878. 

Compiled from the Records of the Mercantile Agency of John McKillop & Co. , 
401 California Street, San Francisco. 



Thursday, January 17 th. 



GRANTOR TO GRANTEE. 



DESCRIPTION. 



Lewis Pierce to A M Jewpll. 

Antonio Lorenzo to P Marsicano. 

IJ J Bbay io Chas Murray 

Chas Murray to M Moritz. 

JaB G Carson to Henry Barroilhet 
Mnsc Cem'ty Assn to L S Clark.. 
A L Swctland to . hristph'r Eazzoi 
Mas Davis to Bertha Schonwasser 
Palk Matron to Mary Phelau 



N S Simpkins to J'h'na Habenicht 

Wm Scholle to KStruuss 

Jno P Hickey to Cfith E Hickey.. 

Chap Duhiman to Henry Meyer... 
Fredk Weisenhorn to G Neumann 
Jno N Turpi n to S L Johnson ... 
M Comertbrd to J M Comerford. . 



N 21st, 25 e Capp, e 50x95 

N T Bush, 8-1:10 e Stockton, e 24:4x78.. 

E Minna, 90 n 15th, n 25x80 

Same 

E Church, 135 n loth, n 25x125 

Lot 33, section 18— N A 

Lot 1, blk 2D, West End Map No 1... 
Und % ne Wi-bt r and Sutter, 137:0x12 
N Sacramento, 137:0 w Devisadero, w 

27:0x127: K 

S Pine, 200:3 w Hyde, w 33:9x137:6 

Sw Tyler and Franklin, s 120x137:6 

Sw Jackson and Dnpont, s 23:2, w 80, w 

80, n 8 ins, w 20, u 22:4, e 100 to be;,'.. 

N Geary, 215 w Powell, w 35x137:6. 

Nw Folsom, 175 ne 8th, ne 25x120 

S Ca!'a, 177:3 w Dnpont, w 29x120 

Se Dolores and Duncan, c 64x100 



|PKICE 
$3,600 



1,900 

1,000 

500 

103 

900 

5,000 

Grant 
5,500 
10,500 

39,000 

1 

8,000 

5 

100 



Friday, January 18th. 



Geo D Gardiner to Joe DaviB 

Peter Meyer to Henry J Meyer. . . 
Joe Durbron, Jr to Selina Clark.. 

Edw Wolf to Joseph Davis 

Jas W Wood to Benj Wood 



Thos M Stewart to J H Boardman 

Francis Camber to J F Dwyer 

Michl Camber to Mary E Caraher. 



Lot 30, blk 6, Miss'n and 30th Ex Home- 
stead Union 

Und % w cor Fremont and Folsom, uw 
SO x sw30 

ECTFarrell allev, 119:1 ?,j n O'Farrell, n 
18:4 iC, e 00, & 18:10, w 00 to beginning. 

Sw Broadway and Cberrv, e 27. nw 1711:7 
el75 .' 

W A blk 633, at cor Eugenia and Point 
Lobos av, w 22:10 lo land of B Wood 
then to a pt, th to Engenia, th to be;,'.. 

E Film ore, 55 s Sutter, s 55x93 

W Euivka, 2H0 s 20th, s 75x130 

W Eureka, 200 s 2Uth, 8 25x100 



$ 5 

10,000 

1 

500 



2,100 

4,500 

2,150 

340 



Saturday, January 19th. 

C G Fichtner to J D F Firhtner. . IN Fell, 55 w LagunuTw" 27:0x120 

Sav and Ld Soc to Jas Mcintosh. S 29ch, 280 w Sanclu-z. w 25x114 

Lots 8, 9. blk 642, Pt Lobos Av Hd Assn 
JN 15th, 346 w Noe, w 74x115 

N 2}d, 25 e Columbia, e 35x101 

S Filbert, 87:0 w Powell, w 19x70 

Yerba Buuna section piat 10, Odd Fell's 

Lot 15, bib 19, City Land Assn 

[Lots 133, 130. Academy Tract 

Wm K Van Allen to John Short.. N CaPa, 137:6 w Walnut, w 137:6x1527: % 

Wm Hale to Henry Pierce |Se Clay and Devisadero, e 81:3x137:6.. 

Alexr Forsyth to Cath M Dudgc. .Lot 41, blk 261, Geary St Ex U'd 

Sara Walsh to Sebastian GronppJE Mission, 38 u 25th, e 27x65 



Wm S Mitchell to D B Franklin. 

Alfred Burr to Thos J Diss 

Thos Griffin to John Moriarity... 
Chas GoettiDg to D Gardemeier. . 
Odd Fells Cty A«m to Jas Macken, 

J C Duncan to Wm Demir 

Jno F Coafcley to Thos Mclnery.. 



Gift 

350 

1 

1,200 
500 

300 

90 

100 

3,000 

5 

300 

1,800 



Monday, January 21st. 



David Porter to Jas LawBon IN Sacramento, 137:0 w Powell, u 137:fix 

nl37:fi 

John G Kcllogs to P H Canavan..|Nw Clay and Franklin, w 68:9x127:8^— 

Pleas'nl Val'y Hd to D Norcross.jLot 28, blk 297, in said Homestead 

Ford H Rogers to Same Lot 3, blk 34, Excelsior H'd Aesocialion 

Excelsior Hd Assn to F H Rogers Same 

Jas S Reynolds to J E Tnwnsend.|N McAllister, 185 w La r kin, w 21:3x120. 
Edw Roper to James S Reynolds. IN McAllister, 137:6 w Larkin.w 63:9x120 

Rob't Brotherton to T O'Donnell. E Lasnna, 80 s Union, e 80 x s 19 

Bav ViewH A to J M RobertBon.JNe 30th av, 150 se G, se 75x100 

Op' House & Art Bg A to J Coffin.N Mission, 115 w 3d, n 275 x w 110 

R Brotherton to R Richmond C Stevenson, 110 n 18th, n 25x.S0 

Same to A J McPbail IS Walker, 131:3 w Webster, w 25x a 120 

Moneon Russell to R't Brotherton IN Pt Lobos av, 70 w 21st, s 25x100 

Cors Donovan to D A Hulse IE Guerrero. 70:6 s 21st, s 25x1000 

Wm Hale to Anna M Powers IE Lagtina, 137:6 s Pine.n 22:6x80 

S O'Donnell to Hib Sav and Ln SiNe Dupont and Vallejo, n 150:3x83:0 

W Mey er to Frank A Moore . ...ISe Tehama, 153:4 ne 9th, ne 24;3x80 



18,000 

1 

1 

1,000 

300 

150 

134 

1 ,000 

500 

5,097 

1 

1 

600 

1,475 

5 

42,050 

3,000 



Tuesday, January 22d. 



nenrvGoetjen to H E Goertzhain;Nw Dolores and 29th, n 26:6x100.,... 

T L Elliott to John Pforr Ne Waller and_Fillmore, n 87:0x35:6 . 

Wm J Siiaw to Timothy Lynch. , 



Fredk Junker to Chas D Junker. 
Wm Reed io Wm Hollis. 



N 14ih, 80 w Harrison, u 86:8^i, w : 

s 89:134, e 23:9 to begmnin;; 

\S Goui-h, 30 s Oak, s 30x87:6 

17'h, 95 e Capp, e 30x125.. 



Francis Boylan to Jas Boylan Se Stevenson, 498 sw 7th, sw 25x75 



Chas B Elliott to Saml F EHiolt,. 
Jno W Hahn to Paolino Galli .... 

IraP Rankin toC F Basset t. 

Thos T Hcald to Emlie Middleton 

Wm S Bel] to Margt Schrieber — 
Joseph RingoLto Henry F Burns 
Jas Cannon to Chas Wilson 



W Shotwell.llo n 20th, n 25x115. 

Se Montgomery and Union, s 48:9x46:3.. 

W Hartford, 124:4 n 19th, n 24:8x125 

N Washington, 183:4 w Larkiu, u 127:8Hi 

x w 45:10 

Und \' a of an acre of O L lands 

Ne California and Devisadero, n 100x30. 
\\ Nebraska, 300 s Yolo, s 100 x w 25... 



$3,100 
125 

1,400 
8,500 
4,483 

400 
1 ,200 
3,000 

600 

5 
1,500 
3,000 
1,725 



Wednesday, January 23d. 



W A Howard to Rchd D Chandler 
J B Moore eta] to E P Hill 



John Revalk to J B L Brandt 

Margt Hansen to John Anderson. 
Edwd Wolf toJBL Brandt 



Milton Newell to L B Newell 

Steph H Smith to Dennis Redman 
Win Hollis loLREllert 



Patk Martin to Diedrich Behrens 
S H Smith to Walter W Gotlin.. 
Geo C Ilickox Io Wm Alvord ... 
Wm Hollis to Margt A C Hyde. . 
I N Choynski to I N Choynski.. . 
Chas II Bryan to Jeannie Bryan. 
A W Vonschmidt to B C Wright 
Jno Brickell to Jas Regan 



E Sherman, 148 s 17th, e 125 x s 74 

Nw Larkin and Ellis, w 300, n 120, el20, 

e00, elOO, s 60 to beginning 

Se Toiiquiu and Webster, c 412:6 x s 275 
E Broderick, 113 6 Geary, a 22:6x92:6.. .. 
Sw Cherry and Broadway, - 27, nw 176:7 

e 175 to beginning 

Lots 628, 629, Gilt Map No 1 

Nw California and 21st av, w 60x100 

N Sutter, 93:3 e L3 on, e 44:3, n 137:6, w 

37:6, s 30:6, w 0:9, s 107 to beginning.. 
E Devisadero, 27:8^ s Clay, s 25x81:3. . . 

N California, 60 w 21stav, w OOxl'.lO 

S California, 137:6 w Scott, w 100x137:0. 
E Franklin, 75:8 s WashiDgtn, 6 26x137:0 

EShotwell, 100 s 17th, e 24x122.6 

S 14th, 17Se Castro, e 26x115 

W2ISLav,300n California, n 100x120... 
Sc Valencia and Herman, s 300, e 100, e 

30, e 100, s 65, c 80, s 25, w 89, s 85, e 

100, 6 25, w 20, a 5, e 50, s 75, e 108:7 .. 



$1 ,500 

20 
4,000 
1,350 

2.075 
200 
410 

2,000 

1,150 

315 

5 

5,500 

92 

Gift 

340 






CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



15 



THE ONLY SIN. 



:i)U}f thit. „» 

which it will 
.earth as ft •' 

.V tli.lt 

lis iniquity, which rt< 

v other 
ill r the hc*d oi " indiw rations," 

i. ■ crime i-f poverty. The form of this 
" and by this 
imlition «>f those who wei 
irly " unheautifiil " (to use the modern 
ustratiniiH of the fa I 
■ ually poor. That which 
nd it is unpleasant I 
ire liable t.» the capricca of fate. Thi ten out- 

' hut of commiseration fur the sufferer, for impecunioeitj 
■ t all in i!*fui ' 
Whei ■ has been rich his impoverishment te regarded by 

■ I hat bis former accru 
■ rry for him; but their Borrow i> *>f tl 
■ which they would feel were he to commit murder, and, 
j are at the thought, their private opinion is that the only 
obscurity and allow his very name 
: into oblivion. The body of the murderer ia buried in quicklime 
annihilation, and the memory of the ruined gentle- 
! "tit with little leas rapidity. But, besides these offenders, 
of human beings who have been, as it were, born 
in Bin, Hi'w sad it is to contemplate this wicked race, the unholy 
company <>f "poor relations!" Why they were ever called into being 
is, to their wealthier brethren, an unexplained mystery. If they are 
shown ;i certain amount of pity, they are made to feel how much 
the world would get on without them. As a punishment, they 
are tnnually tortured in the mansions of their luckier relatives. In this 
civilized century, instead of being consigned to dungeons, the domestic 
culprits an- sent up into garrets ; instead of being thrown among Bnakes 
uo toads, they are invited to meet their host's moBt disagreeable ac- 
qnaintancea. If not exposed as targets fur his archers, they are at any 
rate made to serve as butts for his sarcasm and scorn. The only way in 
which they may obtain a temporary pardon is by performing a penance 
quious humiliation. To submit to be patronized, to praise every 
ii and every action of their rich kinsmen, may for a time bring 
smiie alleviation of their miseries, but any amelioration of their condition 
will be but temporary. They are sinners, and it is thought right that 
they should be constantly reminded of thifl fact. 

proof "f the : their guilt, we may observe that many 

■ . ■ ■ ■ i people— would, we believe, prefer to have a wealthy 
indent as a relative rather than a poor man of the most unim- 
peachable morals. Nay, we do not feel certain but that many parents 
dislike leas that their sons should spend a few years in immorality 
than that they should, when very young, marry penniless girls. Poor re- 
lations are thorns in the Bide ol purse-proui men. What is the use of 
Dg his own clothes at Poole's and his wife's at Worth's, if his 
relations persist in coming to his banquets in the very reverse of wedding 
garments ? For what purpose does he buy carriages of the latest models, 
ii" his cousins continue to drive up to the door of his London house with 
the shabbiest of carriages and liveries, but of colors identical with his 
own ? What mockery could be more bitter than this? To say " not at 
home," under such conditions, is assuredly the whitest of lies. 

It may be said thai not only does the application of the magic wand of 
poverty produce sin where an old-fashioned moralist would least expect to 
and it, but its withdrawal renders actions harmless which a prejudiced person 
might imagine to be vicious. If a rich man is a bad husband, or a gam- 
bler, or a glutton, the world h charitable enough to say that in his position 
the general tone of his surrounnings is such that temptations beset him on 
every side, and it is quite a marvel that he is as well behaved as he is. 
How beautiful a thing is charity! But is the same rule applied in the case 
of a convicted pickpocket who has been brought up to his profession from 
his early childhood? 

The charitable excuses which are made for the escapades and short- 
comings of the rich are not often extended to the poor, whose very status is 
held to be sinful. The peccadilloes of the latter must be corrected 
with punishment, but those of the former with kindness. — Saturday Me- 



The dangerous sympathy of large classes in the United States with 
the revolt of labor against capital, of which Mr. Plunkett's recent report 
has made public some important evidence, was illustrated in a very scan- 
dalous fashion at Pittsburg at the close of last month. The grand jury 
of that city, where the strike rioters were most successful in destroying 
property and inspiring tenor, actually agreed to a ''presentment" in 
which, Bays the Nt W York Nation, " they laid the blame of the riots and 
the resulting destruction of property in that city on the troops, the police, 
and, in fact, on all that portion of the community not actually en 
in murder and pillage, and made the rioters appear a very ill-used body 
of men." The Nation goes on to say that they threw on the troops who 
took refuge in the round-house the blame of the burning of the freight- 
cars, inasmuch as taking refuge in the round-house suggested to the riot- 
ers the plan of roasting them out by sending burning cars down the 
track against the track ; which makes Lord Thomas Fitzgerald's defence 
before the Council at Dublin of his burning the cathedral at Caahel, 
"that he thought the Archbishop was inside," seem less comic than it 
has hitherto been considered. We are glad to say, however, that this ec- 
centric view of the matter by the grand jury, which was doubtless taken 
in part in order to save the country from possible pecuniary liability, does 
not seem to have been adopted in the courts, where many of the rioters, 
though probably not the worst, have been convicted and sentenced to the 
extreme penalty of the law. — Pall Mall Budget. 



One lady in Maine boasts of hair eight feet and one inch in length, 
and that she has refused an offer of $2,000 for it. 



CHINESE CONTRIBUTIONS TO NATIONAL REVENUES 
IN SAN FRANCISCO. 
It la painful to pee the depths to which Uis average political mind will 
nlarity which would be nauseous to all 

In the form of 
nlar" to tin- peopb- ,,f the United States, on the < Chinese qui 
in which the following extraordii , tence : "The 

from the money wraith of 
thla State not lesa than o d^li-ir.-.-, while 

?o contributed NOTHnto to the £ Accord- 

all reliable authorltli number ■>! Chinese in California, 

of every age and sex, Is about 00,000, not more. Many of them tu 
chants and manufacturers. I I 

between China and San Francisco that our imports from and ex- 
ports to that country ' ' '' a leading position in our mercantile 
transacti-'ii.-. and from I* !'.' t<> tin- pi sen! tim. the grand total of the pre- 
■ nt. in China in payment for her commodities does not ex- 
1 hi hi. it, is, therefore, supreme folly to assert that 90,000 

yielding the point that they aiv :tll l;il»i. rn> have, forwarded 

ii( core in the same time than was ahippod to equalize the en- 

rce with California I the Pacific States and Terri- 
tories, That is sufficient to dispose of the first specification. To the one 
that thev have contributed nothing to the State, we reply : Through * !hi- 
neae " cheap labor" we have built up industry upon industry, and estab- 
lished the manufacture of many articles for which we would otherwise be 
dependent upon outside sources of supply. 1 1, h:ih largely through that 

q< 3 that railroad communications have been bad with the East, and 
have laced a large portion of this .State, by means of which Caucasian im- 
migration has been induced, immense tracts laid open to settlement, nu- 
merous farms brought under tillage, flourishing towns started where 
formerly the coyote and prairie dog held sole occupation, and the hum of 
thrift and industry has succeeded the silence of the desert. That will do 
to answer to the second specification, and to the third, viz., "that they 
have contributed nothing to the national wealth," we present rebutting 
evidence of an official character as received from the proper Custom 
House authorities, as follows : 

The total customs collections for 187*i amounted to $7,S1S,.%0 35 

" 1877 " " 6,992,432 5b' 



Less ©1,125,936 79 

A falling off of about 15 per cent, in 1877 from all sources, the amount 
paid by Chinese in 187b" was about in the same proportion as in 1877. 



Paid by Chinese, 

January, 1877 35137,733 39 

February 132,061 1)8 

March 133,197 90 

April 124,828 88 

May 168,012 72 

June 135,201 87 

July 160,232 97 

August 134,273 80 

September 154,105 35 

October 184,895 26 

November 179,899 11 

December 105,373 85 



Others. 
$339,769 17 
370,* I! 50 
410,410 73 
406,318 12 
414,307 70 
448,204 45 
316,029 70 
439,724 18 
500,372 55 
500,446 30 
300,155 92 
284,245 16 



Total 
$577,502 56 

503,506 48 
549,617 03 
531,145 00 
582,320 42 
583,406 32 
482,262 67 
573,907 98 
654,567 90 
604,341 56 
570,055 03 
389,619 01 



$1,756,505 08 §4,935,927 48 $6,692,432 56 
Custom House, San Francisco, ) 
January 14th, 1878. J 
I hereby certify the foregoing summary to be a true and correct state- 
ment of duties paid by Chinese and others for the period above men- 
tioned. E. G. Waite, Naval Officer. 

It will be seen that of the §6,692,932 paid for customs dues in this city 
the Chinese contributed §1,756,505, or more than one-sixth of the whole 
amount. Furthermore, that while there was a falling off of 15 per cent, 
from all sources in 1877, the Chinese paid in the same proportion as in 
1876. Result, first, second, and third specifications not proven ; charge 
not proven, and the whole affair a wanton, unwarrantable piece of nien- 
dacity. — Commercial Herald. 

Wholesale Grocers. 



REMOVAL. 

L.H.Newton.] NEWTON BROTHERS & CO., [Morris Newton. 

Importers and wholesale dealers in Teas, Foreign Goods and 
Groceries, have removed to 204 and 20U California street, San Francisco, Cal- 
ifornia. J une 7. 

TABER, HARKER & CO., 

Successors to. Phillips. Taber A- Co., Importers and Wholesale Gro- 
cers, 10S and 110 California Btreet, below Front, San Francisco. April 15. 

Newton Bootu, C. T. Wlieeler, Sacramento. | J. T. Glover, W. W. Dodge, S. F 
W. W. DODGE & CO., 

Wholesale Grocers, corner Front anil Clay streets, San 
Francisco. April 1. 

CASTLE BROTHERS.— [Established, 18500 

Importers of Teas and East India Goods, Nos.213 and 215 
Front street, Sun Francisco. Jxun. 13. 



S 



A DEAD SHOT!— 48 OUT OF A POSSIBLE 50! 
teele's Cough Mixture, a compound of Squills. Senega 

Anise, and other well kin.wn Vegetable Remedies, Prepared and sold by 
JAMES G. STEELE & CO., Chemists and Apothecaries, 
Nov. 10. No 316 Kearny street, bet. Pine and Bush, S. F. 

BAGS, TESTS AND HOSE, 
NEVILLE A 00., 

113 Clay and 114 Commercial streets, 

San PrANCIBOO. [May 24. 



JOSEPH GILLOIT'S SlEEL PENS. 

Sold by all Slalioners. Dole Agent l«r the Halted Stuns: 
Mil. HENRY HOB, ill Join street, N Y. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 26, 1878. 



LIES OF THE DAY. 



A lie has no letrs, and cannot stand: but it has wines, and can fly far ai d wide — 
W\rburton. Withthe adaptability of a lie, sin has many tools, but a lie is the handle 
which etsthemall.—LOHD Brougham. A lie becets others: one he must be thatched 
with another, or it will soon rain through— LoitD Thurlowe. __^ 



It 13 not true that Counsellor Clark paid Ben. Johnson to advertise 

his pawn shop. That Pixley also took a fee for that prodigious puff of 

Li-po-tai.— That the Chinaman's great patient did not die as he predicted, 
"when the grass began to grow. "— That there is great competition 
among the medical men in the matter of giving one another away about 
professional secrets.— That Shorb has been made a victim, for which we 
are sorry, though we hope that the ten thousand dollar fee may be some 
consolation.— That three weeks in the country was a long enough ab- 
sence.— That either the eye-opener who told the story, or the medico 
about whom it was told, has to be the "under dog" in the fight which 
must go on.-— That Drs. Todd and Blach need investigating. —That it 
will be a good time to begin with the former when he is again a candidate 
for Coroner or School Director.— That it is always in iirder in regard to 
the latter.— That a city physician should heal himself.^— That helping 
Todd's family as he helped his own, would have been exceedingly good 
naturedifit had not been for the thousand dollar fee.— That Kearney 
will nominate the next State and City officials, but they already begin to 
fear he will.— That Hucks & Lambert's axle grease and North Carolina 
rosin, have' increased in price.— That quantities of these necessaries will 
he used to harden the hands of the anticipating "sons of toil."— —That 
Judge Bob Ferrall "holds the age."— That he don't care for the Court 
if he can get the Gubernatorial easy chair.— That Mayor Bryant and 
Louderbaek rosin and grease three times a day.— —That Senator Nunan 
and Tim McCarthy expect to go to the Fotrero next week for a dollar a 
day.— That Senator Bones has promised to give McCoppin a favorable 
introduction to President Kearney.— That "Cobb, of the One Hundred," 
and " McCorab, of the Military," will be forgiven if they " hold up their 
hands."— That the Open Letter will have all the State and City patron- 
age.^— That Delos Lake says he has made a mistake. That Mark 

McDonald wonders if a decoction of "wildcats" doubly distilled, and 
used as a wash., will turn him into a working man. — - That Farley says 
he is safe, and don't care how many dry Bones are made to rattle in the 
State Senate. That the U. S. S. is good enough for him.— That de- 
sponding Republicans and confiding Democrats now have an opportunity 
to mingle tears over the Kearney chasm. —That weary and perplexed, 
they wonder what will be the next move.— That the Chronicle has taken 
a huge dose of the phvsic, smacks its lips over it. and calls it benedictine. 
— That Tom Morton did call on Emily on her note of invita- 
tion, and that "the boys" did wait on the stoop on the opposite 
side of the street to note Tom's appearance after the interview. 
—That Jeff Maury knows how it is.— That " Happy Jack " has made 
a "ten strike" by signing the pledge.-^— That his conversion is positively 
a fact, and he is now a bright Jewel in the M. E. Church.— —That 
he yearns to get fully into its protecting bosom. ^— That the ladies 
are sympathizing sisters, and also yearn.— That a Church revival 
is generally needed. — That a new religion is being talked of.^^ 
That the Stock Exchange Building on Pine street, will be its temple.— 
That Rev. Wayman C. Budd will be its pastor, assisted by Deacons 
Logan, Coit, Hassey, and Ned Cahill — — That Mammon will be the God 
elect and Stocks the ministering angels.— That all the members must 
subscribe to the principle, "let us pre//."— — That they believe not in any 
double L unless manipulated in Nevada block. ^— That Lissac may try for 
the Presidency, but he may not set it. — -That he knows how not to get 
it from experience.— That Michael Reese contemplates establishing free 
soup kitchens.— —That he would gladly do so, but he can't afford it these 
hard times. — That he is afraid he may die poor.— That his great worry 
is, what to do with those pants when lie has to shuffle. That he has 
about decided to take them along.— That Bell, the very unsavory carpet 
man, is not the Bell of telephone celebrity.— That they tell a phunnp 
story about him in the Fifteenth District Court, however.— That Judge 
Dwinelle is ever affected in his morals by the recitals of the many marital 
immoralities to which he has to listen.-^— That there is no room in the 
Cosmopolitan numbered 12.— That there is either a " dead secret" or a 
joke attached to it.— That all the guests during the past week have been 
whispering to one another as to what it means. — That they began to 
wonder if Duncan and LeWarne were located there. — That the police 
were informed and the reward claimed.— That they watched a woman 
in black go in. — That they are still watching.— — That the proprietors 
had better clear up that mystery. 

[For Sacramento " Lies of the Day," see Thirteenth Page.] 



THE LATE MRS. ALEXANDER AUSTEN. 

It is with extreme regret that we have to announce the death, on 
Tuesday evening last, of this most excellent lady, the wife of Alexander 
Austin, ex-Tax Collector and a member of the San Francisco Stock and 
Exchange Board. Mrs. Austin has been a resident of this city since 1850, 
and was known for her kindliness of heart and many acts of charity. Her 
illness, which was of less than a fortnight's duration, was of an exceed- 
ingly painful nature. A carbuncle affecting: the spine was the cause of 
death. The obsequies took place on Thursday, and were of a peculiarly 
impressive and solemn character. The large parlors of the Occidental 
Hotel were thronged with a host of friends of the deceased lady, who had 
gathered to pay to her memory the last sad earthly tribute. The casket 
was placed upon a pedestal in the center of the rooms, and was sur- 
rounded with a profusion of rare and costly flowers. At the head of the 
casket was placed a beautiful wreath, flanked on either side with a harp, 
crosses and stars made of camelias, white roses and other exotics. Along 
the sides were innumerable flower hearts, baskets and wreaths of immor- 
telles and violets, and bouquets in large quantities. The burial service 
of the Presbyterian Church was read by Dr. Scott, and was followed by 
" Peace to the Memories of the Dead," rendered by Messrs. Campbell, 
Maguire, Mayer and Tippit. The Rev. Albert Williams then made a 
brief address on the many Christian virtues of the deceased, and the loss 
that will be felt by the many whose bounty and charity they have so 
often enjoyed. "Thy Will be Done " was then sung by the choir, fol- 
lowed by the benediction. The casket was then closed, and, followed by 
the large number of mourners, the remains were carried to their last rest- 
ing place. 



DESTITUTION. 

Tlioae who may be possessed of a comfortable home and sufficient of 
this world's goods to ensure daily bread and meat, may not realize the 
pressing necessities of many in our midst, but when they can, by taking a 
walk through the city about the hour of 6i to 74 o'clock, convince them- 
selves of the very painful fact, it is a duty that should appeal directly to their 
manhood. Let them follow us and see what we have seen, and swiftly 
upon the heels of belief, let steps be taken for relief and succor. These 
remarks are induced by the following scene: Time 7:30 Monday evening; 
location, rear Nevada Block, in the alley leading to the California Market 
— a pelting rain-storm, accompanied by wind and sleet— some fifteen men 
wandering up and down the sidewalk, occasionally taking refuge from 
the weather under the market, and the eaves of the buildings, but all 
watching, intently watching — something. Well-appearing men, too, are 
several of them, and ourcuriosity is excited to know what so interests them. 
We wait quietly to see. All at once a rush is made, and a clustering 
mass of struggling humanity gather around an opening door. The good 
Samaritan, in the shape of a man, decorated with a white apron, hands 
out the refu.se bread, meat and bones of the Nevada Restaurant. Our 
curiosity is satisfied, as we see these poor, hungry ones greedily devouring 
the crumbs from the rich men's tables, eating ravenously, eating appa- 
rently to save themselves from the knawings of hunger; eating more as ani- 
mals would eat than as fellow men. God help them, said we, unable to do 
for them as we would have wished, but we'Jlooked at the vacant base- 
ments of the Nevada Block, and wondered why the bonanza owners did not 
utilize them as free soup kitchens for the starving ones of our city. Let 
them and the other rich men open their hands, open their hearts. Do 
not imagine that this story is a fiction. Go and see for yourselves that it is 
true, and upon inquiry, we find that nearly all the restaurant men of the 
city get rid of the scrapings of their places in the same way. Wages of 
one dollar a day, for a thousand men, is but a drop in the bucket. Desti- 
tution, distress, misery, hunger, is apparent in our midst; even men of 
refinement and education are glad of opportunities to work as waiters 
and scullions. Look closely at some of those who take your orders in your 
hotels, and realize that we are borne out by the record. Is this "gener- 
ous, open-handed, charitable San Francisco," of which we write ? Alas, 
yes! Up then, ye princes of Ophir — ye millionaires ! Feed the hungry ! 
Succor the poor ! Let not the boasted record of the past be blotted out. 
Forget not that 

" The quality of mercy is not strained; 
It droppcth as the gentle rain from Heaven 
Upon the place beneath. It is twice blessed: 
It blesseth him that gives and him that takes; 
'T'is mightest in the mightiest * * * 
It is an attribute to God himself, 
And earthly power doth then show likest God's 
When mercy seasons justice." 



CONDITION OF THE SAVINGS BANKS. 

The breeze in financial circles which early in the week threatened 
a general run on the Savings Banks of this city, has fortunately allayed, 
and after drawing out a limited amount, the depositors have carried it 
back to the same or another Savings institution. The daily papers im- 
puted the origin of the excitement to the advice of Dennis Kearney, and 
the Call lays the whole affair at the door of the Chronicle, which published 
damaging insinuations relative to the President of th« bank most 
vigorously assaulted by depositors. Be these statements or suppositions 
true or false, there is a disturbing element which is likely to produce these 
runs at any time, and until the Legislature applies a remedy, bank presi- 
dents will have to pursue a very cautious policy. The failure of Duncan's 
bank and the collapse of the several money traps which followed, was 
enough to shake the confidence of the people in the entire system. Every 
assurance is offered to these depositors that the weak institutions have 
been weeded out, and that all those which are now in existence, are per- 
fectly solvent. This may allay anxiety for a time, but on the least diffi- 
culty or on a mere rumor, confidence is likely to be shaken and millions 
of deposits called for, and the numerous failures in the East reports which 
keep coming over the wires week after week, are certainly not calculated 
to remove doubts and dispel fear. Were a stringent law enacted by the 
Legislature affording ample protection to the depositors, and some efficient 
system devised by which the people could frequently be informed of the true 
condition of the Savings Banks, depositors would feel secure, and we do 
not think that the danger of panics will be removed until this is done. 
It was seriously stated that when a bill was introduced at Sacramento a 
short time since to provide for the appointment of a bank commissioner, 
the stockholders and officers of Savings Banks began to lobby against it. 
Whether this be so or not the measure was dropped. There may have 
been very objectionable features about the measure which have not sug- 
gested themselves to us, but it is certainly possible to form a law that will 
protect honest bankers from the competition of such men as Duncan, and 
afford a reasonable guarantee to depositors that their money will be dis- 
creetly handled, and it behooves all bank managers who are working on a 
sound basis, to aid in securing such wholesome legislation. 



THE LOBBY. 
The lobby at Sacramento is at work. Among those present we 
may mention the following : Alex. Badlarn, looking after Tom Rey- 
nolds' interest in Registration. Capt. Jim Gannon, on Sweeping Ma- 
chine and Text Books. McWeed, interest of Sweeping Machine. Jim 
and John McCord, interest of Mannix, Brady & Walsh, Sprinkling Ma- 
chine. George Swartz, interest Superintendent of Streets. Brady & 
Mannix, trying to pass a bill to sprinkle the streets of San Francisco. 
Capt. A. J . Fritz, interest Military Bill. Nat. Broughton, interest Tax 
Books. Dick Wilson, interest Tax Books. Sam Raney, interest present 
Board of Fire Commissioners. M. C. Hassett, interest of Sheriff Nunan. 
Capt. Thos. Agnew, on Police Bill and Insurance Bill. Supervisor Foley, 
on Coffey's Police Bill. Judge Louderbaek, interest of Police Bill. He 
wants to be inserted in place of Judge Blake, in the McCoppin Bill, 
which is in the interest of Fitch and Pickering. Con. Mooney, interest 
of Kirkpatrick and the gamblers. Commodore Glass, interest of the 
Jamestown. George O'Connor, interest of Mannix, Brady and Walsh, 
Street Sprinkling Bill. Edward Casey, interest Gas Bill. William 
Brodie, Dan Ryan, Rod Ryan, Michael Gulley, James Gilroy, Robert 
Anderson, Robert Wilson, John Kelly, Tom Casey, Tom Cavanah, and 
Pat. S. O'Riley, interest workingujen and Dennis Kearney. 



TO THE 




HEIS^nj 




ER 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 




Offic< — OOf to Ol.l Merchniit (Street. 



VOLUME i8 



SAN FRANCISCO, JAN. 26 1878. 



NUMBEB 1. 



Biz. 



We have in port at Uua writing a fleet of thirty-t»« disengaged' ves- 
sels "i The last engagement for Wheat, onmine to 
nift- knowledge wae that of the Br. bark Duohnr, 1,266 toaa, to Cork, U. 
K.. 47>. 3d. Another huge iron Britisher has been offered ami refused 

i ■ Wheat cargo to Liven 1 direct. These figure* denote a very 

important rise in grain freights bb compared with ruling rates in Decem- 
ber, when the American ship A. D. Snow accepted a Wheat charter for 
Idverpool direct, at 27a. (>d. —the lowest rate, we believe, ever accepted 
here for a like service. During the week past the following charters for 
Wlie.tt are recorded : Ship Valparaiso, Wheat to Cork, U. K., 42s. 6il. ; 
t" the i Continent, -47s. (id. ; Br. bark Aglaia, 821 tons Wheat to Cork, U. 
K-, 45a., etc. The late free offerings of Wheat caused a marked decline 
in the price, and this, with heavy rains, has reduced the rate to $2 15@ 
ctl. 

The Rain-fall of the present season now exceeds twelve inches, and 
this baa been pretty generally distributed throughout the State. The ex- 
treme northern and southern counties have had their full share, and the 
ilturists in those grain growing districts are very jubilant at the 
brilliant crop pros|iects now well assured to them. In the middle and 
central counties around o\ir bay. less rain has fallen than elsewhere, never- 
theless the Contra Costa Gazzttc is now willing to admit that the rains have 
been copious for the season, and the plowmen can now speed the plow 
through their hard adobe soil, and that even on this heavy clay land the 
fanner is now hopeful as to the future crop yield. Altogether then, we 
Californiana have great reason to be thankful over the bright crop pros- 
pects before us, and shipowners, the world over, can now look to the 
Pacific slope with confidence, knowing that California and Oregon are sure 
to pan out large grain crops in 1878, with a fair prospect of earning re- 
munerative freights for their ships. 

Our Wheat receipts from July 1st to date, are six million centals 
less than for a corresponding period the year before. Of Barley, we are 
short of 1870, receipts for same period, of 700,000 ctls. 

Our exports of Wheat and Flour from July 1st, 1877, to date, for 
two seaaons past, stand thus : 1877-8.— Flour, 222,723 bbls. ; Wheat, 
2,720,046 ctls. 1876-7- —Flour, 339,246 bbls. ; Wheat, 8,640,854 ctls. 
The present price of superfine Flour is $4 75@$5. Extra superfine, $5 25 
(3 $6 75. Golden Age, Golden Gate, and Genesee Mills, extra Family 
and Bakers, .$6 50(«j$6 75 $ 196 lbs., all in cloth. 

Wheat— The offerings of late have been quite liberal, and shippers 
have been free buyers at §2 25(^215 $ ctl., the market closing within this 
range for all good to choice parcels. Our exports to the United Kingdom 
for the current harvest year dating from July 1st to date embrace 67 ves- 
sels with 2,673,178 ctls. Wheat, value $6,287,781 ; same time 1876, 247 
vessels with 8,570,706 ctls., value $15,356,053; same time 1875, 126 vessels 
with 4,558,863 ctls., value $10,142,187. The above valuations include 
more or lees Flour sent by the different vessels in addition to the Wheat 
recorded. At this date there remains on the Liverpool berth eight ves- 
sels, of some 10,000 tons registered tonnage. 

Barley. — The stock in the State is comparatively small, yet there are 
a few weak holders anxious to sell out at $1 50@$1 60 $ ctl. for Feed ; 
Brewing, $1 65@$1 70 ft* ctl. 

Oats.— The Northern supply is liberal, with sales at ?1 65@^2 05 
$? cental. 

Corn. — There continues to be some demand for Mexican ports, with 
sales at $1 55<a>Sl 65 V? ctl. 

Hay.— The supply is liberal, with small cargoes. Sales at $15@22 50 
$ ton. 

"Wool. — The clip is well nigh exhausted. We quote Southern Fall at 
10^124 ; medium, 15(&17c. ; good to choice Northern, I8@20c. 

Hides. — The price of Dry has dropped to 16c. ; Wet Salted, 8®9c. 

Tallow. —There continues to be a good shipping demand at6^@7c; 
Refined, 9c. The ship J. De Costa, for Liverpool, carried 110,594 lbs. The 
ship A. D. Snow, for same, had 15,000 lbs. 

Hops. — There is rather more tone to the market. Sales of 75 bales at 
9A@10.io. The steamship City of Sydney, for the Colonies, carried 208 
bales. 

Potatoes.- The supply is liberal, with free sales at SI 25@$2 $ ctl. 

Borax supplies are liberal, but the spot demand is light at 5J@6c. 
for Concentrated; and for Refined 8@9c. 

Quicksilver. — Our exports thus far, in 1878, aggregate 2,030 flasks, 
valued at $69,642. Same time 1877, 2,655 flasks valued at $102,45S. 625 
flasks decrease 1878— $32,816. The receipts for the current month will 



show a considerable falling off as compared with previous months. Our 
stock is nnt large though liberal. The export demand is light and prices 
favor the buyer, with Sales during the week at 43^ Mc. The Colima, 
hence for Panama on the 18th inst., carried 400 flasks for Mexican ports, 
and 550 dasks for Callao. The City of Sydney, for the Colonies hence, on 
the 21st, carried 40 flanks; andtbe Belgic, hence for Hongkong on the 22d 
inst., carried 450 flasks. 



The general business of the city in imports is rather sluggish for the 
season. However, January has thus far been a rainy month, preventing 
free transportation into the country. Bad roads and overflowed streams 
retard travel very materially. Money is very plentiful, and the outlook 
for a year of prosperity is indeed flattering, as we havo- now 1 had a rainfall 
of twelve inches, which is enough to insure us good crops; and that of 
itself is calculated to provoke a healthy, life-giving trade to all and every 
industry. The agriculturist, the miner, the mechanic, artisan and day 
laborer all look hopefully to the near future for a season of unusual life 
and activity. If our Agitators, calling themselves laborers, would only 
retire from the arena of strife, all would be well. 

Coffee— There is a good demand for prime green Rio and Central 
American at 19@20c. ; for Pale, 16@18c. Stock of the former grade is 
light, pending fresh arrivals from Central America of the new crop. 

Sugar— The refiners are almost out of working stock, by reason of the 
non-arrival of cargoes now fully due. We quote White Refined, 11&@ 
ll:|c; Yellow Coffees, 9^c; Hawaiian, 6 to 9Ac, according to quality. 

Rice — The demand is light, as usual at this season of the year. We 
quote China Mixed, 5ic; No. 1 do., 6@6£c; No. 2 do., 5|@6c; Hawaiian 
sells readily at 5&c. 

Tea— Supplies are free, but the trade having been freely supplied by 
public and private sales during the current mouth, business is now quite 
slack. 

Coal. — The market continues rather sluggish at $7@7 25 for Austra- 
lian. English Steam cargoes have been sold this week at $6 62£. The 
Gas Co. has recently purchased a cargo of Wellington on trial, believed to 
be at $6@$6 25 $ ton. This may also be called the cargo price for 
Seattle and Nanaimo. 

Chemicals. — It is some time since any sales of moment have been re- 
ported. Prices both low and nominal. 

Metals.— Stocks of Pig Iron, Tin Plate, Block Tin, etc., are liberal, 
and the demand light. In the absence of reported transactions, quotations 
are of but little worth. 

Wines. —We submit herewith export prices of California Wines audi 
Grape Brandy. Shipping lots, in good cooperage, f. o. b., ship or raih. 
are quotable in gold at — Dry White Mission, 40c.@50c. $ gal 1 ..; Dry- 
White Foreign Grapes, 50c.@60c. $ gall. ; Dry Red Foreign Grapes, 45c. 
@75c. If? gall.; Port, new, 65c-.@90c. tf gall.'; Port, red, 75c.@$l 25 $ 
gall. ; Angelica, 65c.@85c. ^ gall. ; Grape Brandy, new, $1 75@$1 85 $ 
gall. ; Grape Brandy, old, $1 75@$3 00 $ galL ; Grape Brandy, in bond, 
65c. @$1 10 #gall. 

Bags and Bagging.— The stock of Burlap grain sacks is large, but of 
Hessian piece goods the stock is below the average. Within the last ten 
days, and since the copious rain-fall of twelve inches, almost securing large 
grain crops, the demand for Standard, 22x36, has been great, resulting in 
large purchases for May and June, delivered at 9£@9|e., usual credit. 

Salmon. — The market for Case Salmon has become exceedingly dull 
and lifeless, with a liberal stock of the best brands of Columbia River Fish 
now on hand unsold. The present nominal price for 1 lb cans is $1 60 per 
dozen. 

Honey. — There is now a good prospect ahead for an enlarged yield iu ( 
the year before us. Stocks at present are very light. 

Butter and Cheese.— This year's product will no doubt be greater- 
than ever before. The present price of fresh grass Table Butter in rolls 
is 30@32.W. Cheese is scarce, and wanted at 18@20c. Eggs, strietly 
fresh, 40(|42£c. 

Spirits.— We continue to draw nearly all our supplies of Alcohol, Pure,. 
Spirits and High Wines from the great corn-growing States of Nebraska, 
Illinois, Ohio and Indiana. The price of this Raw Spirits, in iron-bound 
bbls., ranges from $1 15 for Common up to $1 30 for XXX Refined. 
We are also compelled to draw most of our fine old Whiskies from Ken- 
tucky. We note those of G. O. Blake's Old Rye, Gold Dust, Miller's. 
Catherwood's, etc. But none are superior, if equal to, the genuine old 
Kentucky, J. H. Cutter, made by Moorman and stenciled A." P. Ho- 
taling & Co. The sales of this latter are steadily on the increase, having 
been regularly on the market here for twenty -five years or more. 



POSTSCRIPT TO THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan 26, 1878 



'The World,' 

[By t 



the Flesh, and the Devil. 

Truthful Pflnmais.] 



£& a letter addressed by Captain Burnaby to tho Stafford House Cofii- 
mittee, that mail of war Bays, that Captain Fife, ber Majesty's Military 
Attache* at Philippopolis, informed him that, in a town called Kechi Dere, 
a number of Turkish women were deprived of their trowsers by Cossacks, 
and, as a condition of being restored these indespensable garments, al- 
lowed themselves to be baptized, because "if there is one part of her 
body which a Turkish woman dislikes to be exposed more than her face, 
it is her legs." We do nut believe one word of the story. The notion of 
Cossacks acting as missionaries is as ridiculous as is the means which they 
pretended to have used, in order to propagate Christianity >in Bulgaria. 
Moreover, it so happens that a Turkish woman does not object to expose 
her legs. Before the war, the " Sweet Waters of Asia," a promenade 
near Constantinople, used to be the fashionable promenade every Thurs- 
day. The beauties of the harems used to go there in carriage? drar-n by 
oxen. They would get out, and sit about. Their eunuchs aud guards 
did not allow them to talk to anyone. But, like most other women, they 
were fond of attracting attention, and their notion of flirtation was to 
draw up their wide trowsers, and, in an absent sort of way, to scratch 
their legs. We have seen Imperial Princesses do this a handred times, 
much in the same way as, when ladies in England used to wear wide 
hanging sleeves, they would occasionally manage to expose their arms, by 
letting their sleeves fall back. If Captain Fife's reports to the War Office 
are anything like his stories to Captain Barnaby, they must be more 
curious than instructive. — ^There is a rather clever, but^ decidedly anti- 
English ballad in a recent issue of the D&lAin. Nation. We fear, from its 
tone, " New Ireland " is as anti-Saxon as the Ireland of O'Connell's time. 
Here is a specimen couplets 

The poor British, lion is feeling unwell* 
And what injured his health it is easy to tell J 
'Twas a growl from Prince Bismarck, a frown from the Ciaar, 
That gave him his cough and Mb nasfcy catarrh. 
But his system of late has grown feeble and weak [ 
There's no tooth in his "jaw," and no bone in hia "cheek )" 
He has lost all his liking for trouble and toil, 
And what suits him is quietj and eod-liver oil. 
^— Mr. G. A. Sala is writing some curious theatrical sketches in the col- 
umns of a contemporary. Of Mr. Macready, he says: " I Conscientiously 
declare that, in the whole course of my life I never heard any man use 
language so foul and blasphemous as that habitually and systematically 
made use of, behind the scenes, by that illustrious tragedian, William 
Charles Macready. I unhesitatingly, and without fear of contradiction, 
assert that his manners in the theater were simply ruffianly, and that 
his speech and demeanor were as brutal to women as they were toward 
men." All who have acted with Mr. Macready. kno\7 that this is no ex- 
aggeration of his language and demeanor behind the scenes. A greater 
tragedian and a more unmitigated brute never lived. A letter from 
Malta informs us that the Duke of Edinburgh is so ardent a partisan of 
Russia, that, not only have his officers fallen out with him, but he has re- 
ceived a very strong hint from home to abate his zeal. The Duchess of 
Edinburgh, on the other hand, is earning golden opinions, owing to her 
great tact in the difficult position in which she is placed.— »T wo little 
girls were reading to their mother, whee they came to -the word "traitor," 
of which the younger one asked -the explanation. The .lady hesitated for 
a moment about a clear answer, when the elder one said, "I will tell you 
what a traitor is. If you were to go upstairs anci open the canary's cage, 
and then go down stairs and tell the cat what you had done, you would 
tea traitor." Would this accurate description apply to the Times corre- 
spondent, who, when inside Plevna, made an exact plan of all the Turk- 
ish defences, and then went and told the cat by publishing them in the 
columns of his journal ?— -From Rome comes a private letter, which re- 
ports the following incident as authentic: On a rec?nt Saturday, Cardi- 
nal Manning offered the mass of St. Thomas of Canterbury in a room ad- 
joining the Pope's bed-chamber. After the mass, the Pope beckoned the 
Cardinal to him, and facetiously remarked there was little probability 
that the Archbishop of Westminster would ever have to encounter the 
same persecution from a Protestant Government as Thomas a Becket did 
from a Catholic King. His Holiness added, " I admire England and Eng- 
lish institutions, but Englishmen ought never to .forget that it was a Cath- 
olic Church which gave them to her. "^— The Princes Albert Victor and 
George, while stopping temporarily at Exeter recently, looked about for 
a field for amusement, and fixing upon an unfortunate porter they pep- 
pered his ears with peas from a pea-shooter. The porter, not knowing 
who his tormenters were, ran after them, shouting, " I'll pull your ears 
off, you young rascals, if you don't stop that." But the young Princes 
made good their escape, after hugely enjoying the fan. ■ ■ ■" Freedom and 
whisky gang thegither," says Burns ; freedom of speech and water "gang 
thegither," if we may judge from the orators who out- Wilfrid Wilfrid at 
the weekly " exercises " of the American Temperance Union. At a re- 
c;nt meeting of this society a Mr. Ropar, of Broeklyn, closed his address 
by intimating that, when the rum-seller came to die, the devil would say, 
" in his grandest style: ' Doubly bolt and bar the dour, for fear the liquor 
dealer will get into hell.' " Logic aud grammar seem to point to his 
Majesty's "grandest Btyle" being Irish. Irish or not, it was not to pass 
unchallenged.: for a la ly described as " of quite a number of Summers" 
rose to reply at once. Her keen-edged nose, we are told, and very spiral 
curls betokened intellectual acumen and fearless -belligerence ; she sprang 
to her feet, and, with shrill force exclaim id, "I protest to all this talk." 
The result was not creditable to the chivalry of the Union. " The people 
told her to sit down, and the chairman thumped upon his desk, and spoke 
to her sharply, just as if she had been a man, saying that he proposed to 
run the meeting for the present. Being only a woman, of course she was 
obliged to yield. She ceased to protest, and the spirals were stirred only 
by the beatings of an outraged heart." Had Mr. Browning's "reveling 
Hades' mother* been there, she also might have "" protested against all 
this talk," and, as a home-witness, might have been listened to. Anyhow, 
it iB clear that, so far as reporting goes, the American Temperance Union- 
ists are not likely to share the fate of the brave men who lived before 
Agamemnon — carent quia, rale sacro. — Coming Events. 



A PRATER. 



Lead me, Lord^ 
In still, safe places; 

Let mine eye3 meet 
Sweet, earnest faces J 

Far" from the scenes 
Of worldly fashion, 

Of faithless care 

And noisy passion. 



Keep me, Lord, 

Trustful and lowly; 
Fill me with love 

Tender and holy. 
Forget not my need 

Of thy fatherly pity 
Till I have gained 

The heavenly city. 

— Christian IT num. 



CEMETERIES. 

A bill ha3 been introduced in the Legislature to prohibit, after the 
year 1885, the burial of the dead within the limits of any incorporated 
city. Legislative action on this subject should hsve been taken two 
years ago. By the bill now pending, the date of prohibition is too remote. 
There is no necessity for deferring the end of the existing evil beyond the 
first day of January next. There would be no difficulty in procuring, 
within thirty da^s after the passage of the law, a tract of land appropriate 
in area and locality. Three months longer would suffice to survey and 
lay out its grounds, after which it would be ready for use. The embel- 
lishment and landscape beautifying would go on gradually, and after the 
grounds began to be disposed of to individual lot owners, if the Legisla- 
ture will pass a law prohibiting intra-mural interments after the first of 
January next, we have reason to believe that long before that date a new 
site will 'be established and put to practical operation. 

The ex sting evil is fraught wit'fa too much danger to the health of this oj by 
to be tolerated patiently even fer one year longer. The annual death rate 
b t ; "s about the same as in other large and bstter governed cite -^-owit, 2 
per cent, of the t >tal population. With a population of 300,000, the burials 
in the San Francisco cemeteries during 1877 numbered nearly 7,000. If 
this city increases for the next eight years— that is, up to 1885, the date 
named in the bill referred to— as it has heretofore increased, San Francisco 
will then number 500,000 inhabitants, and during that period, estimat- 
ing the mortality at 2 per cent, annually, the deaths and burials will be 
65,000. That is about the number of bodies which have been already 
buried in our city cemeteries. Considering the fact that the cemeteries 
have at this date become a nuisance, we cannot understand the policy 
which would permit that nuisance to be doubled before abating it. San 
Francisco is already stretching out beyond the cities of the dead, which 
have hitherto been upon its borders. The opening and extend ng the 
California Street Railroad will soon bring the lands beyond the ceme- 
teries into available use for residence. Tho public will not go there to 
live if the dead are to be their neighbors. 

A cemetery is the best real estate project of the day. Lands suitable, 
and within six, eight, or ten miles of the business and populous portion of 
the city, can be purchased for five hundred to a thousand dollars per acre. 
The minimum price for graves and family lots in cemeteries is a dollar a 
square foot, or thirty thousand dollars per acre. There are 43,500 square 
feet in an acre, of which 30,000 square feet are available for sale, the re- 
mainder being necessary for avenues, paths, etc. 

The great cemeteries of New York City — Calvary and Greenwood — 
comprise -over a thousand acres, and are located on Long Island, several 
miles distant from Brooklyn. In those cemeteries lots and graves are sold 
at two and three dollars per square foot. In other large cemeteries it is 
quite as cnsllyst > get buried; ana, according to the general schedule of ex- 
penditures attending funerals, we have come to the conclusion that it is 
cheaper to live than to die. The cemetery grounds, for the future de- 
mands of this city, should not he less than five hundred acres. They 
shoidd be to the leeward, and not to the windward, of the city. They 
should be cached by rail, so that the expensive system of long lines of 
hackney- coach processions could be dispensed with. It would pay to 
build and operate a railroad, ten miles long, for funeral purposes only. 
With 20 burials daily, and 25 attendants at each, there would be 500 
p'Bsengers to be carried out and brought back; at 25 cents fare each way, the 
revenue would be $250 a day. Such a railroad would not require a sub- 
sidy. In fact, the Cemetery Company and the Railroad Company would 
have a mortgage on every man, woman and child in the city; and it would 
only be a question of time how soon they would foreclose on and gather 
them in. 

TOM SCOTT'S TEXAS-PACIFIC SCHEME. 
"Washington, January 25th.— The House Pacific Railroad Com- 
mittee this morning heard arguments on the Texas-Pacific Railroad bill. 
Mr. Storrs, for the Southern Pacific Railroad Company, contended that 
the Texas Company had not completed its railroad as the law required, 
and it was now competent to adopt measures to secure its speedy comple- 
tion. This could be more effectually done by granting authority to the 
Southern Pacific Company to continue on East to the Rio Grande at El 
Paso, and transfer so much of the former land grant as it should earn by 
so building. He also claimed that the Texas Company had no right to 
build a railroad across California, not having authority from that State. 
He also contended that the Southern Pacific had a right to construct a 
bridge across the Colorado river, and the Texas Pacific had not. 



San Franciscans Abroad.— Pakis : Miss M. Dempsey, W. W. 
Hoag, Mrs. Oulton and family. London : S. Y. Ransome, A. A. 
Wneeler. Nice : Mrs. G. Hyde, Miss Hyde, George L. Massey, At- 
kins Massey, Mrs. A. Massey, A. Whitcomb, Geneva E. Hull, Dr. 0. S. 
and Mrs. Nichell, Mrs. J. Farrell. Naples : David and Mrs. Farquhar- 
son, Miss M. A. Farquharson, Davy Farquharson. — American Register, 
January 6th, 1878. 

For Honolulu. — The Pacific Mail steamship St. Paul, hence for the 
Is'ands on the 24th inst., carried government mails, pi singers, and a full 
cargo of general merchandise, valued at S67.000 ; freight. $4 per ton. 
More cargo was offered than the steamer could carry. Thus far the ex- 
pectations of the owners have been more than realized in running a regu- 
lar monthly steam packet to the Islands. 

It was a Long Island man who, at half-past one, remarked to his 
wife as he came in that he had a good deal of bric-a-brac in his hat. 



L«U 



POSTSCRIPT TO THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LKTTER. 



8 



Condensed News of the Week. 



L4HAL. 
Monday. Jan 21st -Another warrant, changing Kearney srlta mis 

drairr ITU sorted OB him OD Saturday. 

n him and liberty, in addition I** the 

99.000 alrr*d\ up.— Four poll irched the boSK of Morris 

-••■iii-T and Pierce, on Thursday, 
I n 1 their game, J. C. Ounce*. 
Tuesday, 22d City Mid County Attorney Burnett has given bla 
rd of Super vvtiiRi has no le-^al power to appoint 100 
bm, as rvqs>*AteJ by the Pence Commissioners.-^™ 
df the ex President, intends to make Sun fTran- 
I home, ami has already U. -i in mercantile 

panoita. 
■Wednesday. 23d.— Yesterday J. L. Hunt and W, 1>. Coateswere 
n in plaint of Henry Mute, who charges then with embezzle- 
nckbrokera, and the complainant nays that they 
I propriated money lent them fur stock transaottona,^^Walte* £ 
, wi,.. was arrested yesterday fer having brokea windows on Kear- 
ny, Puel and afontgamtry streets, was today sent to the Insane Asylum 

Ttmrsday. 24th. — The one-franc subscription opened in this city, in 

aid , f project to erect a monument to ex-President Thiers, 

I. and the amount Bubecribed, $595 90, sent to Paris.— 

An addr^s t<» the Legislature has been prepared by the Managers and 

'rotestant Orphan Asylum, opposing the condemnation 

u between Market street and Park for the proposed road, on the 

i that it will seriously injure the institution. 

Friday, 25th- -A life-saving station is being erected nn the ocean 

let of the entrance of < I olden Gate Park. Objection lias been 
id, ob the ground that it often happens that a boat can- 
not be lunched from there oil account of the heavy surf.— It is 
i at San Rafael that W. S. O'Brien, of the firm of Flood & 
O'Brien, will erect a costly and elegant residence in that suburban town. 
—•The funeral of Mrs. Margaret Austin, the deceased wife of Alexander 
Austin, took place from the Occidental Hotel at noon to-day. The mem- 
bers of the Sun Francisco Stock Exchange attended in a body. 

TELEGRAPHIC. 

Monday, Jan. 21st. --New York, Jan. 21st.— A letter from Mrs. 

Fremont, now in Paris, France, has been received, stating that the 

trials resulted in-giving General Fremont complete release from 

all obligations. '■ " Tweed has made application, in the Supreme Court, 

oxter the Poor Debtor Act. He was taken to Court, 

_ of the case was postponed.— Washington, Jan. 21st. — 

t .,;. Adair, ' a of the Cherokee Nation, opposes the bill to establish 

the Territorial Government of Okaluhoma in the Indian Territory. 

Tuesday, 226.— The Attorney-General lias addressed a letter to the 
District Attorney at Chicago, instructing him to proceed at once in the 
r.tion r.f the whisky cases.— The Senate Judiciary Committee 
agreed to report favorably on the nomination of Poole as United States 
Marshal for California.—— Secretary MoCrary has transmitted to the 
House a >d« tailed account of the troubles between the Texas and Southern 
Pacific Railroads in relation to the right of .way across Yuma Reservation 
in Arizona, and requesting Congressional action. 

Wednesday, 23d. —New York, Jan. 23d. — W. H. Vanderbilt ap- 
peared at the Coroner's and gave $2,000 bonds to appear at the inquest 
in the case of M. Riley, who died -of injuries received by being run over 

in November last by Vanderbilt. Washington, Jan. 23d.— The House 

Committee on Indian Affairs have agreed to recommend the passage of 
the bill providing for the transfer of the Indian Bureau to the War 
Department. 

Thursday, 24tb.--N-EW Yokk, Jan. 23d.— The Tribune's Washington 
special says that Fernando Wood has receded from the plan to tax tea 
and coffee, which has developed so much opposition. —Washington, 
Jan. 231.— The Seuate to-day confirmed Aaron Bell as Register of the 
Land Office at Shasta.— —Washington, Jan. 24th.— The President has 
sent the following nominations to the Senate: B. F. Peixotto, California, 
to be United States Consul at Lyons, and Stilhvell H. Russell to be 
United States Marshal for the Western District of Texas. 

Friday, 25th. —Washington, Jan. 25th.— At the hour of adjourn- 
ment yesterday 120 signatures had been obtained to the resolution pro- 
posing organization among Representatives to procure the remonetization 
of silver and a repeal of the Resumption Act.— Washington, Jan. 
25th.— The House Pacific Railroad Committee heard argument con- 
cerning the Texas Pacific bill. Mr. St-irrs, for the Southern Pacific, 
contended that the Texas company had no right to build the road across 
California, not having authority of that State.— Those deeply inter- 
ested say the President declares he will not ask the present Congress to 
make an appropriation to pay the $5,000,000 awarded to Canada by the 
Fishery Commission. 

FOREIG5. 

Monday, Jan 21st— London, Jan. 21st. — It is reported the Chinese 

have captured the city of Kashgar. Constantinople, 5an. 20th.— 

Mukhtar Pasha has been appointed to the command of the army to be 
formed along the line of defense before Constantinople.— London, 
Jan. 21st.— Cleopatra's Needle has arrived at Gravesend. 

Tuesday, 22cL — London, Jan. 22d. — A Russian official dispatch from 
Kazanlik, dated 19th, says General Gourko fought Suleiman Pasha from 
loth to 18th. The Turks were finally driven into the Rhodope moun- 
tains. Their loss wna 4,000 killed and 8,000 prisoners. Forty-nine guns 
were also captured.—- -LOND01T, Jan. 22d.— A Russian official dispatch 
from Tiflis says : General Komaroff's detachment from Ardanutsch 
stormed Artvin on the 12th. The Turks lost heavily and the Russians 
slightly.— The Turkish Peace Plenipotentiaries have telegraphed to the 
Porte announcing their arrival at Kazanlik on Sunday night. 



Wednesday, 23d. STDVnT, New Sonth Wales, January 22d. 

i int. ii- Iv hot A great di i Mv prevaieQt.—^LoHDON, 

3d. The ancartaJn itata ol political affairs checks all business. 
Dfanoont bonnes, are said to hold vei aunts of money, whiol 

ere annuls to employ on any terms.— Cokstamtikople. Jai 
Porte claims to have Information that the Russians will reach OallfpoUs 
by the Mth at the latest. In diplomatic circles this apprehension u re- 
■ 
Thursday, 24th. Lonxw, Jan. 24th 5 v If, Sir Stafford North- 
i the rlonae of Commons that he will on Monday move 
for the supplementary Supplies for the naval and military mTviee. ' — 
.. Jon, Mtfa 4 r. \i. The depressed feeling at the Stock Kx 
ohaa b oonticnes. It Is rumored the Government will :isk for :i credit 
..i . It ih also said large Belling orders have been received from l';iris. 
— London, ,!;ui. 24th. -A dispatch from Constantinople reports that 
the fleet commanded by Marthorpe Bey has started for Kavala to embark 
Suleiman Pasha's troops. Half of his army will be conveyed to Gallipoli 
and half to Constantinople. 

Friday. 25th. — London-, .Tun. 25th, — A provincial journal says : the 
Duke of Cambridge, Field Marshal Commanding in Chief, who was visit- 
ing in the country, was unexpectedly summoned to London by telegraph 
on Wednesday morning,-^— Constantinople, Jan. 25th. — The Porte hav- 
ing yesterday accepted the Russian conditions, peace is regarded as vir- 
tually concluded. The Russian conditions are not yet officially known, 
but it appears certain that they gradually exceed the conference pro- 
gramme, and stipulate bo.h for territorial concessions and the payment of 
a war indemnity. 

EXCESSIVE SPECULATION. 
Excessive speculation is, the New York Tribune observes, the curse 
of business in the United States. In the grain business, as in the stock 
market, the " bull " speculation of last Summer has been very costly — 
how costly the British trade reports already show. America had a mag- 
nificent crop, and it was certain that there would be a much larger quan- 
tity of grain than usual for export. There was a great war in Europe and 
short crops in many countries, but especially in Great Britain. There 
was a certain prospect of a ready sale for the enormous surplus harvest of 
the United States at a reasonable price, and some advance in price was to 
be expected. The chance was one of the rarest ami grandest to start all 
the wheels of industry, and put the country far forward on the road to- 
ward a solid prosperity. Then came American speculation. The Amer- 
icans are a very " smart " people, and the speculator calculated that he 
had Great Britain in a tight place and could make her pay as much aa he 
pleased for grain. The price was, therefore, by well known arts, pushed 
up naturally. Stocks were accumulated and shipments checked ; Liver- 
pool was " cornered," it was thought, and would be forced to settle at 
American terms. The result has been of a painfully disappointing na- 
ture. Great Britain has, indeed, been forced to buy during the three 
months ending October 31 more wheat by 4,709,375 cwt. than she pur- 
chased during the same months last year, ami has paid 63 cents more per 
cwt. ; but she has taken from America only 1,132,488 cwt. more, while her 
receipts from Germany have increased 1,064,250 cwt., and from Russia, in 
spite of the war, 1,359,377 cwt, while even Turkey has much more than 
doubled its sales. From Egypt, in spite of the scanty crops and high 
price, there has been some increase. The United States, instead of selling 
fully 9,000,000 bushels more to Great Britain than they did during three 
months in the autumn of last year— which they might have done easily 
and at a handsome profit — have continued to increase their sales only 
about 2,100.000 bushels. The Americans mighthave realized an increased 
profit of 50 cents per bushel, or $4,500,000, but they demanded 70 cents, 
and realized only §1,470,000. Railways and ocean shippers are in part re- 
sponsible for this result, for the advance in rates was unreasonably large. 
But the mischief has been mainly done by the great grain speculators at 
Chicago, Milwaukee, Baltimore and New York. Repeatedly this season 
they have forced prices upwards so far that shipments could not be profit- 
ably made. Some of them have lost heavily, others have still on hand 
large stocks of grain ; but the greatest harm has been done to all legiti- 
mate business. The country has lost many millions which it might fairly 
have made and really needs. Revival of commerce and industry has been 
delayed. A magnificent opportunity has been thrown away. All this has 
been accomplished by a smart effort to " corner " Liverpool. — rail Mall 
Budget. 

A telegram from Bucharest, dated December 2Gth, says: "Osman 
Pasha arrived here this evening. He occupied a suite of three rooms on 
the first floor of the Grand Hotel Brofft. He is accompanied by his sur- 
geon, who acts as interpreter, since Osman himself speaks nothing but 
Turkish. He has also several Ottoman attendants, besides the Russian 
staff officer who has charge of the captive hero. A guard of honor paces 
up and down the corridor opening on Osman's apartments. When Osman 
reached the landing of the hotel, a little Roumanian girl stepped forward 
and presented him with a beautiful bouquet of flowers. The tiny donor 
was lifted up by the physician of the marshal, and the defender of 
Plevna bestowed a hearty kiss upon the lip3 of the little lady. Osman 
appeared greatly touched by this incident. It is believed that Osman 
will remain a prisoner of war at Moscow. — Overland Mail, 



Beerbohm'a Telegram.— London and Liverpool, Jan. 25, 1878.— 
Liverpool Spot Wheat, firmer; held higher owing to political uneasi- 
ness. Wheat unsettled, apparently sixpence better. Club, 12s. lOd. to 
13s. 3d. Liverpool Average Spot Wheat, 12s. 7d.@12s. 9d. ; Consols, 95; 
Gold, 24; Sterling Exchange, 82i@85 ; Mark Lane Wheat, Is. per qr. 
deai-er ; not much demand. No. 2 Spring Off Coast, 50s. 6dL; No. 2 for 
Shipment, 49s. 6d.@50a.; Red Winter Off Coast, 54s.; California Off 
Coast, 62s.; Just Shipped, 56s. 6d. ; Nearly Due, 59s. 6d,; Club, 12s. lid. 
<ai3s. Id.; Average, 12?. 8d.@12s. Ild.; Red Winter Spring, 10s. 9d. 
@lls. 4d, Leis excitement. 

Ten to one it used to take Eve three hours and a half to pick out a 
leaf-green dress to suit her. 



POSTSCRIPT TO THE SAN FKAMUSOO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 2P, 1ST8 



Cradle. Altar, and Tomb. 



CRADLE. 

Boass— In this city, Jan. 21, to the wife of Isidore Boass, a son. 

Block— In fiis citv, Jan. 21, to the wife of J. Block, a son. 

Crabb— In this city, Jan. 17, to the wife of Henry Crabb, a son. 

Davis— In this city, Jan. 20, to the wife of D. Davis, a daughter. 

Fraxblis— In this city, Jan. 20, to the wife of M. Franklin, a son. 

Green— In this city, Jan. 19, to the wife of George Green, a son. 

Healing— In this city, Jan. 20, to the wife of Jauies Healing, a daughter. 

Hari-eh — In this city, Jan. 20, to the wife of E. B Harper, a daughter. 

Kaijn— In this citv, Jan. — , to the wife of Paul ICahn, a son. 

Lelaxd -In this city, Jan. 23, to the wife of Henry LeJand, a son. 

Martik— In this city, Jan. 20, to the wife of J. Martin, a daughter. 

Ml iDLETOX— In this "city, Jan. 8, to the wife nf A. P. Middled in, twin daughters. 

O'Brien— In this citv, Jan 19, to the wife of James J. O'Brien, a son. 

Pvne— In this city, Jan. 24, to the wife of E. Pyne, a daughter. 

Schoen— In this city, Jan. 19, to the wife of J. J. Schoen, a son. 

Taylor— In this city, Jan. 20, to the wife of D. Taylor, a son. 

Y-iLLOTT — In this city, Jan. 24, to the wife of William Vellott, a daughter. 

ALTAR. 

B arrows-Leonard — In Iowa Hill, Jan. 11, North wood Barrows to Nancy A. Leonard. 
Campbkll-Pkkl— In Los Angeles, Jan. 17, Rev. A. M. Campbell to Josie E. i*eeL 
Clark-Clark— -In Visalia, Jan. 1G, G. W. Clark to Nancy A. Clark. 
Cjsgrove-Bryax— In Sonora, Jan. lo, Charles S. Cosgrove to Mary E. Bryan. 
Eikerencotter-Dohax — In this citv, Jan. 10, Charles F. Eikerencotter to L. Doran. 
Goviieseix-Tboy— In this city, Jan. 12, Pierre Goyheneix to Mary Troy. 
Heuer-Riekles — In San Lorenzo, Jan. 19, Geo. C. W. Heuer to Hulda J. E. Riekles. 
Jackson-Connelly— In this city, Jan. 13, William Jackson to Nellie Connelly. 
Kievb-Fox— In this city, Jan. 22, Lipmann Kieve to Sophia Fox. 
Roberts-Wilkins— In Santa Rosa, Jan. 10, George F. Roberta to Alice E. WUktns. 

TOMB 

Am ask- In this city, Jan. 19, Henry Amark, aged5 weeks. 

Austin— In this city, Jan. 22, Margaret, wife of Alexander Austin. 

B egos— In this city, Jan. 21, William Beggs, aged 50 years, 

Bodill— In this city, Jan 20, John Bodill, aged 39 years. 

Cowdery— In this city, Jan. 23, Mary Elizaheth, wife of J. F. Cowdery, 

Deursen— In this city, Jan. 22, J. H. van Deursen, aged 26 years and 3 months. 

Duffy— In this city, Jan. 24, D. S. Duffy, aged 13 years and 28 days. 

Griffiths- In this city, Jan, 12, G. E. Griffiths, aged 13 years 1 month and 1 day. 

Garratt- In this city, Jan. 21, Amazila M. Gairatt, aged 2 years 10 mos. and 2 days. 

Gaffney— In this city, Jan. 19, Mary Gaffhey, aged 18 years and 11 nsonths. 

Gleasox — In this city, Jan. 22, Susie J. Gleason, aged S years and 17 days. 

Hilton — In this city, Jan. 21, John Hilton, aged 74 years and 3 months. 

Hoi'GH— In this city, Jan. 21, James Hough, aged 03 years. 

Johnson— In this city, Jan. 20, Reuben K. Johnson, aged 2 years 4 mos. and 2 daya. 

Lyons— In this city, Jan. 24, Augustine Lyons, aged 11 months and 21 dajs. 

McCullol'gh— In this city, Jau. 21, Samuel McCuilough, Jr., aged 28 years. 

Pettigrew— In this city, Jan. 23, John Pettigrew, aged 25 years. 

Whitney— In this city, Jan. 24, Jessie F. Whitney, aged 20 ypars 10 mos. and 3 days. 

HIGHEST STOCK QUOTATIONS FOR WEEK ENDING JA-N 25, 1878. 

Compiled by Hopkins & Macfarlanb, 228 Montgomery St. 



Name of Mike. 



Argenta 

Andes 

* Alpha 

*Alta 

Alps 

* Bullion 

♦Belcher 

Best a: Belcher.. 

Bdiiton 

Bodie 

Cons Imperial. .. 

Crown Point 

Chollar 

California 

Con. Virginia.... 

Caledonia 

Confidence 

*De Frees 

Eureka Con 

Exchequer 

*Gould & Curry . 

Gila 

Grand Prize 

*Hale&Norcross 

Julia 

•Justice 

Jackson 

Kentuck 

♦Leopard 

' Lady Wash n . . . 

♦Leviathan 

Leeds 

'Mexican 

Modoc 

Manhattan 

Northern Belle . . 

Ophir 

Overman 

Raymond & Ely. 

Rye Patch 

♦Savage 

* Sierra Nevada .. 

Silver Hill 

Seg Belcher 

Solid Silver 

Succor 

Silver King, Ar'a 
Silv. King South. 
Trojan 

* Union Con 

* Utah 

*Yellow Jacket.. 



Sat. Monday. Tuesday. Wkdnesdt Thursday. Friday, 
a.m. p.m. a.m. p m. a.m. p.m. a.m. p.bl a.m. p.m. 



331 



31* 



lli 



m 



133 



lli 



HI 



11 

4 



18J 



2J 

14 

_3 
n 

60} 
18i 
9 

111 



31 



Assessments are now due on the Stocks above marked thus * 
Never put off a joke till to-morrow what yon oan do to-day. 



T 



A RARE CHANCE. 

TO LEASE FOR A Nl'MBES OF TEARS, 
he World-Kenowneil and Magnificent Three-story E.li- 

THE HONGKONS HOTEL, Hongkong. 

This spacious and commodious hotel is situated in the very heart of the business 
part of the town, near the PRAYA, and in full view of the landing places of all the 
mail and coasting steamers. The building has every 

KODEKK IMPEOVEMENT, 

and all the conveniences, an elegant bar, billiard rooms, reading rooms and a DINING 
HALL, which will accommodate 
TWO Hl'KDBEI) PERSONS, ETC-, ETC. 
For photographic views, plans and further particulars, apply to 

WEGENER & CO., 



319 California St. 
received at osir of- 



W 



J»n. 19.1 

Timiers- for Trail amission to Ilon^SiOii; 
flee nntil February 1.1th, 1S7S. 

PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

The Company's steamers will sail as follows at 12 M.: 
CITY OF TOKIO, February &th, for YOKOHAMA and HONGKONG. 

GRANADA, February 5th, for PANAMA and NEW YORK, calling at MAZATLAN, 
MANZANILLO. SAN BLAS and ACAPULCO. Hereafter the Panama Steamers will 
leave on the 5th and l&t'i of ex\.h month. Tickets to and Sroni Europe by any line 
for sale at the lowest rates. 

SOUTH CAROLINA, February 8th, for ACAPULCO and all ports south of Acapuko. 

AUSTRALIA, February 18th, at 12 o'clock, « or on arrival of the English 
mails, for HONOLULU, AUCKLAND and SYDNEY. i?10 additional is charged for 
passage in Upper Saloon. 

DAKOTA, January 30th, tor VICTORIA, PORT TOWNSEND, SEATTLE, TA- 
C'MAa,,d OLYMPIA, connecting at TACOM A with Northern Pacific Railroad for 
PORTLAND, Oregon. Tickets must be purchased before 11 a.m. on day of sailing, 
at 222 Montgomery street, or at Wharf Office. For freight or passage apply at the 
office, corner of First and Brannan streets. 

Jan. 26. WILLIAMS. BLANCH ARD & CO.. Agents. 

SAUCELITO FERRY. 
inter Arrangement.— -On and after November 51h, 1377, 

a swift and commodious steamer will leave as follows : 

Sax Fbanxisco, foot of Davis street : 8:45 a .m., R. R. ; 10:45 A.M. ; 3:30 P.M. ; 5:C0 
P.M., R. R. SAUCtLlTO : 8:00 a.m., R. R. ; 9:30 A.M. % 1:00 P.M. ; 4:15 p.m., R. R. 

Sunday Time.— San Francisco, foot of Davis street : 10:00 a m., It. R.; 12:00 
m. ; 2:00 p.m. ; 4:30 P.M. SAl'CELiTO : 9:00 A.M. ; 11:00 a m. ; 1:00 p.m. ; 3:00 P.M. : 
and 5:20 P.M., R. R, 

On MONDAY an Extra Trip from from San Fraacisco at 7:00 a.m. 

LANDS for sale in lots to suit. Inquire at the office of the Company, No. 320 San- 
some street, or of M. DORE & CO., No. 410 Pine street. 
Nov. 10. FRANCIS AVERY, Superintendent. 

OREGON STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

The Only Direct 91 nil liine to Portland, Oregon.— Regular 
Steamers to PORTLAND from San Francisco every FIVE DAYS until further 
notice- Steamships GEORGE W. ELDER, CITY OF CHESTER, AJAX, and STATE 
OF OREGON (now building), connecting at Portland, Oregon, with Steamers and 
Railroads and their connecting Stage lines for all points in Oregon, Washington and 
Idaho Territories, British Columbia and Alaska. This Company has the exclusive 
right of selling Through Tickets at Reduced Rates over the Oregon Central and Or- 
egon arid California Railroads in Oregon, and EMIGRANTS to Oregon furnished with 
Certificates entitling them to travel at Half Rates over these roads. 

Caution.— This is the only line running NEW IRON STEAMSHIPS with every 
modern improvement for the comfort and safety of passengers. 

Nov. 3, K. VAN OTERENDORP, Agent, 210 Battery street. 

PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

Steamers of this Company will sail from Broadway Wharf 
for PORTLAND, Oregon), every 5 d&vs, direct, and for LOS ANGELES, SANTA 
BARBARA, SANTA CRUZ, SAN DIEGO, SAN LUIS OBJSPO and other NORTH- 
ERN and SOUTHERN COAST PORTS, leaving SAN FRANCISCO about every 
third day. 

For Day and Hour of Sailing, see the Company's Advertisement in the San Fran- 
cisco Daily Papers. 
J^r™ Great Reduction in Rates of Fare to Portland, Oregon. 
Ticket Office, No. 214 Montgomery Street, near Pine. 
GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Agents, 
Dec. 22. No. 10 Market street. 

OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL STEAMSHIP COMPANY, 

For Japan and China, leave wharf, corner First and Bran- 
nan streets, at noon, for YOKOHAMA AND HONGKONG, connecting at 
Yokohama with Steamers for Shanghai. 

GAELIC Saturday, Feb. 16th. 

OCEANIC Tuesday, Dec. ISth, and Saturday, March 10th. 

BELGIC Tuesday, Jan. 22d, and Tuesday, April ltith. 

Cabin Plans on Exhibition, and Passage Tickets for sale at Nit. 2 New Mont- 
gomery street. For Freight, apply at the Pacific Mail Steamship Company's Wharf. 
T. H. GOODMAN, General Passenger Agent. 
GEORGE H. BRADBURY, President. Jan. 19. 



SEALED PROPOSALS. 

State of Calif ornia, Department of State, Sacramento, De- 
cember 24th, 1877. — Sealed proposals for translating into the Spanish language 
such laws as may be authorized by the Legislature now in session, will be received at 
this office until 12 o'clock m. on the FOURTH DAY OF FEBRUARY, 1S7S. Envelopes 
inclosing each bid should be indorsed, "Bids for translating laws, etc. , into theSpan- 
ish language." Man 10.1 TjJOMAS RECK, Secretary f State. 

~~ PARTNER WANTED. 

A gentleman, with good connections abroad, is desirous of 
forming a partnership with another gentleman having the command of cap- 
ital, and of good social standing, with the view of establishing a foreign and local 
business of importance. A thorough knowledge of the resources of the State, agri- 
cultural and mineral, is indispensable. 
Jan. 19. ^ Address, P. O. Box 1530, San Francisco. 

FOR PORTLAND, OREGON. 

The Only Direct Line. Leaving- every Five Days..-. Steam - 
ship CITY OF CHESTER, Mackie, C< mmander, leaves Folsom-street Wharf. 
Jan. 26. K. VAN OTERENDORP, Agent, 210 Battery street. 



The Special Organ of " Marriott's Aoroplano Navigation Co."--Fr«d. Marriott, Patentee. 



Prlo* per Cop?. 10 Centm.' 



ESTABLISHED JULY, SO. 1866. 



[Annual Subaorlptlon, •&. 







DEVOTED TO THE LEADING INTERESTS OE CALIFORNIA AND THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Vol. 28. 



SAN FEAN0IS00, SATUEDAY, FEB. 2, 1878, 



No. 2. 



ORiroMoiihoSan Francisco News Letter, nnd California Mall 
Has, S"uth ridl Mt-rcli.-uu street. No. 607 to 61ft, San Francisco. 

GOLD BARS— 800@!)10 -Silver Bars— «@15 tf cent. disc. Treasury 
are Belling at 98$. Buying, 0H\, Mexican Dollars, C@GJ 
l>cr cent, disc Trad e Dollars, 4j@-5 per cent. 

tS~ Exchange on New York, h per cent, for Gold ; Currency, 1@1\ per 
cent premium. On London, Bankers, 49§d.@49&d. ; Commercial, 
4' l ,«l.@'50d. Paris, 5 franca per dollar. Telegrams, 65-100@.^ per cent. 

«*■ Latest price of Gold at New York, Feb. 1, at 3 p.m., 102. Latest 
price of Sterling, 482A@484A. 

tST Price of Money here, 3@1 per cent, per month — bank rate. In the 
open market, 1@1&. Demand active. 

PRICES OF LEADING STOCKS AND GOVERNMENT BONDS. 
San Francisco February 1, 1878. 



Stocks and Bonds. 
U. 8. Bonds, 6-208 1867-88 

Letnl Tender Notes 

S. W. City & Co. B'ds, 6a, '68 

B. F. City Bonds, 7s 

Bwanmento City Bonds — 

Yuba County Bonds, 8s 

Sao Mateo Co. Bonds, 7s... 

8. F. Gas Light Co 

National G. B'k & Trust Co. 
Spring Valley Water Co 



Bid. 


Axked 


104 


105 


93 


(I8J 


102 


104 


105 


108 


26 


28 


97 


— 


100 


— 


9JJ 


95 


VY* 


80 


91 


92 



Slocks and Bonds. 

Omnibus Railroad Co 

Central Railroad Co 

N. B. and Mission R. R. Co. 
Front St. , M. & 0. R. R. Co. 

Fireman's Fund Ins. Co 

Union Insurance Co 

Pacific Bank 

The Bank of California 

Central Pacific Railroad — 



Bid. 


Asked 


80 


33 


70 


75 


70 


Mi 


22 


25 


95 


100 


108 


112 


110 


115 


HI 


95 


85 


86 



THE STOCK MARKET. 

The monotonous condition of affairs at the Boards continues without 
any change, and by this time the brokers and operators are calmly re- 
signed to the situation. The market for the week just passed has been 
devoid of any interest, and the fluctuations have been so slight that deal- 
ers have withdrawn from the market entirely. Prices, however, are well 
sustained, and there seems to be an evident determination on the part of 
the " insiders " to hold the market. The present stagnation and dullness 
is to be sure, vexatious, but in view of the encouraging condition of 
affairs at the mines, we can afford to wain awhile for the " good time 
coming." At the close there was quite an upward movement noticed in 
Justice and Alta, said to be based upon a final and satisfactory settle- 
ment of the complication between those companies. The report was con- 
firmed later in the day, which induced a spirited demand for the latter 
stock, which, we understand, receives the "lion's share "in the compro- 
mise. With a termination of these troubles, we may look for a lively 
deal in these stocks at once, though the recent slaughtering of the 
" street " on the last "Alta deal " has rather unnerved operators for the 
time. There has been so much Baid in condemnation of Messrs. Flood & 
O'Brien in connection with the "Alta swindle," that we feel compelled to 
deny the statement in Into, and it necessary we shall make the public ac- 
quainted with the bottom facts of the case, which are in our possession at 
present. The Bonanzas continue as the main stay of the market, and 
remain at fixed prices as firm as the ro~t£ of Gibraltar. Outside stocks 
were completely unchanged, with only a moderate business doing. The 
market generally was firmer at the, close. 

THE AZTEC MINING SYNDICATE. 
The affairs of this influential body have an interest for that large 
class of thoughtful citizens who see a great future for Arizona, that it is 
hardly possible to overrate. We are, therefore, glad to be able to report 
that the Syndicate is making gratifying progress in the various directions 
in which its enterprise extends. We recently told of the work being done, 
and of the promising results at the Company's mines. Further reports 
from the new Superintendent, Col. Tozer, are to hand. They show that 
he has taken hold with a will that proves him to be the right man in the 
right [dace. Flattering as has been the progress heretofore made, we are 
persuaded that the future will be even more fruitful of results. The 
Syndicate's efforts to enlist the co-operation of Eastern capital is meeting 
with that exceptional degree of success which the exceptional promise of 
their enterprise fully warrants. Shares are being subscribed for in St. 
Louis, Chicago, Cincinnati and the South. With capital, combined with 
their good management and integrity of purpose, they can hardly fail to 
realize, in a large measure, the great expectations which well informed 
Californians have formed of the value of the Aztec Syndicate's property. 



Mr. F. Alfrar, No. 8 Clements Lane, London, Is authorized to 

receive subscriptions, advertisements, communications, etc., for this paper, 



Published with this weefc's issue a Four* 
JPar/e Postscript. 



LATEST ATOMS OF NEWS OF FACT AND THOUGHT. 



The Terms of Peace. — According to recent telegraphic advices, the 
Russians are hardly more than one day's march distant from Constanti- 
nople. The following are reported to be the terms of peace which Russia 
has named: _ The independence or Servia; The cession to Montenegro of 
Antivari, Nicsies, Spuz and a portion of Lake Scutari; Bulgarian auton- 
omy according to the conference programme ; The opening of the Straits 
of Dardanelles to Russian ships of war; The occupation of Batoum, Kars 
and Erzeroum by Russia until a war indemnity of £20,000,000 is paid ; 
Part of the Russian army to embark at Constantinople for their return 
home; and the final treaty of peace to be signed at Constantinople by the 
Grand Duke Nicholas. 

San Franciscans Abroad.-- Paris: Mrs. Bosworth, J. E. Carroll, J. 
Gray, Mrs. Green, Miss T. Green, Miss A. Green, Mr. Harlain, Mrs. 
Harlain, B. Ivions, Mrs. B. Ivions, T. Kelly, Capt. W. Kohl, Mrs. W. 
Kohl, Jackson McKenty, J. McKenty, Alex. Moody, Mrs. A. Moody 
and family, Mrs. Oulton and family, Mr. White, Mrs. White. London: 
L. J. Ransome, Nice: G. F. Baker, W. Bonynge, George L. Massey, 
Atkins Massey, Mrs. A. Massey. Geneva: A. Kingsley, J. Kingsley. 
Dresden: Mii3M. Dempsey.the Misses Luning. Rome: M. P. and Mrs. 
Connor. Naples: Dr. O. O. and Mrs. Burgess, Mrs. 1L A. Bartlett, 
Miss Bartlett, Mrs. Chamberlain, Miss E. Chamberlain, Master 0. F. 
Chamberlain, D. Farquharson, Miss M. A. Farquharson, Miss M. Cham- 
berlain, David and Mrs. Farquharson, Miss Farill. 

Latest from the Merchants' Exchange. — New York, Feb. 1st, 
1878.— Gold opened at lOlg ; 11 A. M., at 101J ; 3 P. M., at 102. United 
States Bonds — Five-twenties of 1867, 105£ ; 1881, 104£. Sterling Ex- 
change, 4 S3® 4 85, short. Pacific Mail, 22$. Wheat, $137® $144, 
dull. Western Union, 77& Hides, 194@20£. Oil— Sperm, SI 03@#1 05. 
Winter Bleached, SI 23 <a>, $1 28 ; Whale, 55 @ 65; Winter Bleached, 
03@72. Wool— Springy fine, 22£@33 ; Burry, 12£@.1G y Pulled, 30@40. 
Fall Clips, 18@23; Burry, 16 ® 25. London, Feb'. 1st.— Liverpool 
Wheat Market, 12s. fid. @ 12s. 9d. Club, 12s. Sd. @ 13s. 3d. United 
States Bonds, 105^@104§. Consols, 95. 

The Rain Record— Spring Valley Water Catchment— The rain- 
fall at the Spring Valley reservoirs for the season and for the 48 hours end- 
ing Thursday, is thus given by the records of the Company : Pilarcitos, 
48 hours ending at- 8 a. M. Thursday, 2.09 inches; season, 31.41. San 
Andreas, 48 hours, 2.85; season 32.83. Crystal Springs, 48 hours, 2.68; 
season, 25.50; San Francisco, 48 hours, 1.13; season, 17.75. The water in 
Pilarcitos since the first rain has raised from 9 feet to 28 feet 11 inches, in 
San Andreas from 33 feet to 44 feet. The Signal Service Observer reports 
72-100ths of an inch forthe 24 hours ending 1:30 p. M: to-day, making, ac- 
cording to his record, 11.97 inches this month and 16.89 for the season. 



Beerbohm's Telegram. — London and Liverpool, Feb. 1, 1878. — 
Floting Cargoes, steady ; Cargoes On Passage, very little demand ; Mark 
Lane Wheat, slow; Liverpool Spot, firm; No. 2 Spring for Shipment, 
48s. 6d.@49s. : Red Winter Off Coast, 54s.@44s. 6d.; California Nearly 
Due, 59s.; California Just Shipped, 56s.; California Average, 12s. 6d.@ 
12s. 9d.; California Club, 12s. 9d.@13s ; Red Western Spring, 10s. 8d.@ 
lis. 3d.; Liverpool Spot Average Wheat, 12s. 5d.@.12s. 9d. ; Liverpool 
Spot Club Wheat, 12s. 8d.@133. 3d.; English Country Markets, steady; 
French Country Markets, quiet; Consuls, 95 13-16; Sterling Exchange, 
83<§ 85. 

From Hawaii. — In addition to the steamship arrival of Sugars else- 
where noted, we have now to announce the arrival of the schooner Win. 
H. Mti/er, from Honolulu, to J. C. Merrill & Co., with Sugar, chiefly for 
the California Refinery-say, 6,200 pkgs. This will help to relieve present 
necessities; and, before it is consumed, it is to be hoped that one or more 
sugar-ladened vessels will reach us from Manila. 



They have dime savings banks in Chicago— banks that save for de- 
positors a dime «ut of every dollar. 



Printed and Published by the Proprietor, Frederic* Marriott, 607 to 615 Merchant Street, San Francisco, California. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Feb. 2, 1878. 



SONG. 

[BY H. W. LONGFELLOW.] 

Stay, stay at home, my heart, and rest ; 
Home-keeping hearts are happiest, 
For those that wander they know not where 
Are full ot trouble and full of care; 

To stay at home is best. 
Weary and homesick and distressed, 
They wander East, they wander West, 
And are baffled, and beaten, and blown about 
By the winds of the wilderness of doubt ; 

To stay at home is best. 
Then stay at home, my heart, and rest ; 
The bird, is safest in its nest ; 
O'er all that flutter their wings and fly 
A hawk is hovering in the sky ; 

To stay at home is best. 

OLD LOVES. 

The number of men who have abided by the laws of the Table 
Round, and " loved one woman only, cleaved to her," is probably some- 
what limited. After marriage, of course, steadiness of affection is com- 
mon enough ; and, whatever cynics may say, or skeptics of human nature 
may think, it is not the exception but the rule. But before the tolling of 
the marriage- bell, that curfew, or couvre-feu, which announces that the 
fires of youth must be extinguished, a certain amount of vicissitude in 
what is, at least, usually spoken of as love, is considered permissible 
even by the most austere moralists. Women, who are the law-givers in 
the Court of Love, expect that a man who loves and has wherewithal to 
set up and maintain an establishment, should marry; and they regard 
any aberration on his part from this canon of conduct as reprehensible 
and odious. But the arrangements of this life, however providemtial gen- 
erally, haue not been contrived to such absolute perfection that a man 
who falls in love is always in a position to marry, and the sweet lawgivers 
in Love's Court do not prohibit the operations of a man's heart, because 
his purse happens to be empty. In fact, their first commandment to man 
is, "Thou shalt fall in love with us." Their second is, " Thou shalt 
marry us, if thou hast enough to make us comfortable." As it frequently 
happens that this indispensible proviso cannot be satisfied, they have to 
be content with their subjects' submission to the first only of their edicts. 

Hence the genesis and existence of Old Loves. For there iB a third 
law, long since enacted by fair judges, and it is this: " Thou shalt not 
expect the woman thou lovest not to marry somebody else, if thou canst 
not make her comfortable and he can." The practical disposition of 
women has often been remarked by shrewd students of human nature, 
and their practicability is here shown in a remarkable manner. But it 
must not be supposed that the pauper swain, who has seen his beloved 
carried off under his nose by a gentleman from Pactolus, is expected to 
turn his heel upon the adored one and never give her another thought. 
She is an old love, and if he be preux chevalier, he will treat her as such 
for the term of his natural life. In fact, anybody will approve the con- 
tinuance of his attentions, except, perhaps, the husband ; and if he be a 
sensible fellow he will not object to this particular homage, so long, of 
course, as it is kept within reasonable bounds. Not that the devoted 
pauper, should he suddenly become opulent, or gradually grow well-to-do, 
may not marry in turn ; and then the amount of tender regard he con- 
tinues to cherish for his old love will have to depend very largely, not 
upon her husband, but on his own wife. Women vary, even in a matter 
supposed to be so common to them all as jealousy; but a sensible woman 
will regard her husband's old loves as the least dangerous portion of his 
acquaintance. It has been said that no one ever loves twice. That may 
be doubted. But it is pretty certain that no one ever loves the same per- 
son twice. On revient ioujours a ses premiers amours, is a dictum that has 
been misunderstood by Englishmen, through their imperfect acquaint- 
ance with the language in which it has been uttered. Aimer, in the 
French, means to like, as well as to love ; and all that is meant by the 
above aphorism is, that a man's original disposition is the strongest part 
of him, and that what he does at sixty strangely reminds us, very often, 
of what be did at sixteen. The poet may possibly have been right when 
he said, " They sin who tell me love can die ; " but it can grow uncom- 
monly invalidy and moribund. It is much easier to light afresh fire than 
to reallume one that is all but extinct. The heart is, at any rate, fond of 
novelty to this extent, that it never travels over precisely the same ground 
a second time. Vestigia nulla retrorsum ; and old loves can never become 
new ones. 

It might, perhaps, be thought that, from what we have said, we picture 
to ourselves a world in which each man has one old love, just as each 
man has only one wife. But that is not our meaning. We have dwelt 
upon one old love for the purpose of illustration ; but we are well aware 
that " sacred drawer " may contain several odd gloves, various withered 
flowers, and tokens from innumerable sources, of the time when we were 
young, and foolish, and happy. There is a sliding-scale in love, from 
dainty fancy down to desperate passion. The old loves of which we speak 
are nearer to the former end of the scale, and never get very close to the 
latter, for if they did they might, perhaps, not have as good a chance of 
surviving. One solitary ball may leave behind it the remembrance of an 
old love, though that necessarily depends upon the amount of inflamma- 
bility of the individual, and likewise on the tender tenacity of his mem 
ory. We are disposed to think that the luckiest man in this respect is 
one who does not feel immoderately, and remembers for ever. He is 
pretty certain to have wrought no mischief and the latter half of his life 
may linger, without compunction, on graceful and kindly reminiscences. 
He is not the man for whom women make great sacrifices. These they 
reserve for either very intense or very worthless men ; and the man who 
can think, without vexation and pain, that he ever left a woman less 
happy than he found her, is of a hopelessly base disposition. It is not to 
be desired that too much earnestness should be imported into matters, 
in connection with which, unless they terminate round a wedding-break- 
fast table, earnestness may carry fatal consequences. It is quite enough, 
if a man thinks a girl lovely, charming, clever, and virtuous, and, believ- 
ing that, if he could have married her, he would have tried to win her. 
That forms, or may form, the groundwork of a very pleasant and inocu- 
ous sentiment, for a good many years, or even through life, provided 
either that he continues to see her ever and anon, or never sees her again 



at all. We must confess that it is rather trying to the maintenance of 
tender feeling for an old love, after quitting her in the midsummer of her 
charms, to meet her again, for the first time after many years, in the 
plump autumn of her decay, bristling in artificial corn-flower, and much 
attached to her treasure of a cook, whom she would not part with for 
worlds. To use a beautiful phrase of Goldsmith's, "resignation Bhould 
gently slope the way to the fattening and wrinkling of our old loves." 
The shock should not be too sudden. It is wise, therefore, to keep seeing 
one's old loves periodically, if one does not want to experiennce a painful 
contrast, which may, possibly, excite the suspicion in our mind that we 
are as much changed to our old loves as our old loves are to us. We 
have been writing from the man's point of view, though not without a 
consciousness that women may have old loves as well as men. There is 
no reason why they should not have them, but the impression made by a 
man on a woman he does not marry is not so great as is often made by a 
woman on a man who is obliged to go without her. Of course, women 
will deny this, and we will, therefore, leave them to discuss the question. 

—Truth. 

Ba nks. 

NEVADA BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, 
SA2T FSAJfCISCO, CAJC. 

Paid Up Capital $10,000,000, Gold. 

Surplus (U. S. Bonds) $2,500,000, Gold- 

DIRECTORS: 

Louis KEcLane President. | J. C. Flood Vice-President. 

John W. Mackay , "W. S. O'Brien, James G. Fair. 

Cashier C. T . Christensen. 

Agent at Virginia, Nevada George A. King. 

Issues Commercial and Travelers' Credits, available in any part of the world. 

Makes Transfers of Money by Telegraph and Cable, and Draws Exchange at cus- 
tomary usances. This Bank has special facilities for dealing in Bullion. 

EXCHANGE on the Principal Cities throughout the United States, .Europe, Japan, 
Chiua and the East Indies, the Australian Colonies and New Zealand, and on Hon- 
olulu, Hawaii. 

New York Bankers The Baku of New Tors, N. B. A. 

London Bankers Messrs. Smith, Payne & Smiths. 

[January 26.] 



THE BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital ©5,000,000. 

D. O. MILLS President. j WM. AI/VORD-.-Vice-Pres't. 

THOMAS BR OWN Cashier. 

Agents : 

New York, Agency of the Bank of Calfornia ; Boston, Tremont National Bank 
Chicago, Union National Bank ; St. Louis, Boatman's Saving Bank ; New Zealand, 
the Bank of New Zealand ; London, China, Japan, India and Australia, the Oriental 
Bank Corporation. 

The Bank has Agencies at Virginia City and Gold Hill, and Correspondents in all 
the principal Mining Districts and Interior Towns of the Pacific Coast. 

Letters of Credit issued, available in all parts of the world. Draw direct on Lon- 
don, Dublin, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, Hamburg, Frankfort-on-the-Main, Antwerp, 
Amsterdam, St. Petersburgh, Copenhagen, Stockholm, Christiana, Locarno, Mel- 
bourne, Sydney, Auckland, Hongkong, Shanghai, Yokohama. Nov. 4. 

BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter.— Capital paid up, $1,800,- 
000, with power to increase to 610,000,000. Southeast corner California and San- 
some streets. Head Office — 5 East India Avenue, London. Branches — Portland, Or- 
egon; Victoria and Cariboo, British Columbia. 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened subject to Check 
and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted available in all parts of 
the world- Approved Bills discounted and advances made on good collateral security. 
Draws direct at current rates upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents 
as follows : 

New York, Chicago and Canada— Bank of Montreal; Liverpool— North and South 
"Wales Bank ; Scotland— British Linen Company ; Ireland — Bank of Ireland ; Mex- 
ico and South America — London Bank of Mexico and South America ; China and 
Japan— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China, and Oriental Bank ; Australia 
and New Zealand— Bank of Australasia, Commercial Banking Company of Sydney, 
and English, Scottish and Australian Chartered Bank. 

Dec. 9. W. H. TILLINGHAST, Manager. 

THE FIRST NATIONAL GOLD BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Paid np Capital 92,000,000, Gold. President, R. C. Wool- 
worth ; Vice-President, D. Callaghan ; Cashier, E. D. Morgan. 

Directors :— R. C. Woolworth, D. Callaghan, C. G. Hooker, C. Adolph Low, Peter 
Donahue, D. D. Cdlton, Edward Martin, James Moffitt, N. Van Bergen. 

Correspondents— London : Baring Bros. & Co. ; Chartered Mercantile Bank of In- 
dia, London and China. Dublin : Provincial Bank of Ireland. Hamburg : Hesse, 
Neuman&Co. Paris: Hottinguer&Co. New York; National Bank of Commerce. Bos- 
ton : Blackstone National Bank. Chicago : First National Bank. This Bank is pre- 
pared to transact a general Banking business. Deposits in Gold, Silver and Currency 
received subject to check or on special deposit. Exchange for sale on the principal 
cities of the United States, Great Britain, Ireland and the Continent. Commercial 
Credits issued available in Europe, Chh-a and Japan. Collections attended to and 
prompt returns made at the lowest market rates of Exchange. Jan. 19. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK (LIMITED). 
/Capital, S5, OGO.OOO, of which $3,000,000 is fully paid np as 

\j present capital. Keserve Fund, $450,000. San Francisco office, 424 Califor- 
nia street; London Office, 22 Old Broad street. Manager, ARTHUR SCRIVENER ; 
Assistant Manager, CAM1LO MARTIN; Cashier, WILLIAM STEEL. London 
Bankers, Bank of England aud London Joint Stock Bank ; New York, Drexel, 
Morgan & Co. ; Boston, Third National Bank. This Bank is prepared to transact 
all kinds of General Banking and Exchange Business in London and San Francisco, 
and between said cities and all parts of the world. Jan. 19. 

THE ANGLO-CALIFOKNIAN BANK (LIMITED). 
A 6> 6> Califo'Mia street, San Francisco.— 'London Office, 8 
4ft: /£> .■£> Angel Court ; New York Agents, J. W. Seligman & Co. , 21 Broad street. 
Authorized Capital Stock, §6,000,000. Will receive Deposits, open Accounts, make 
Collections, buy and sell Exchange and Bullion, loan Money, and issue Letters of 
Credit available throughout the world. FRED. F. LOW, \ tw„„„ m « 

IGN. STEINHART, ) Managers. 
P. N. LILIENTHAL, Cashier. Oct 4. 

CHABLES LE (JAY, 
American Commission merchant, - - 1 Rue Scribe, Paris. 



3, 1878. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



LUCK AND ILL-LUCK. 






|| I li- •: of lD BrMtUTM, 

-t.iy ; 
■mootiu the hair back from your featuro*, 
Kunea you quick :m 1 ROM away! 



Pam** Ill-luck > in no nob flurry. 

Nor quick her olo*» embrace she quits ; 

She Mrs she's in no kind of hurrv. 

And rfti up -u >>'iir bed and knit-*! 

— From the German of Heine, 

LORD BEACONFTELD'S POLICY. 
An amusing skit upon the Liberal view of Lord BeaconsfioM's policy 

• , in the form of a letter signed " One Who 
Knows." The writer says : 

" In the first place, an ultimatum will have bean sent to France that 
h men-of-war now outside o{ the aCeditorrsneaa will be allowed 

to ..nt->r that sr:i throu-h tho Straits of GHbrsltsr from fee we ster u 

of Fr.i! re : that no more French war vessels ere to be built 

in the Mediterranean : that the Versailles tioverntnent most not increase 
it* Influence in Egypt, diplomatic, commercial, or otherwise : Inasmuch 
i thin;* u, or at least might become, detriments] to 
British interest! in the Best or elsewhere. In case of this ultimatum 
lined, war to be declared, and cither the Empire or the Legiti- 
mate Monarchy to bo restored, according to the pleasure of that great 
Minister who hss already created an Empress of India. In the next 
place, an ultimatum to Germany not to increase her war navy, lest British 
interests in Heligoland or elsewhere might be injuriously affected, and 
not, either directlv <>r indirectly, to sympathize with Russia, as that can- 
not fail to prejudice British interests either in India or the Mediterranean 
here. War to be declared in default of instant submission. 3d. 
An ultimatum to Italy in the like terms &s that to France, so far as Egypt 
is concerned ; and as regards her armaments, not to increase her war 
navy ; but, on the contrary, to deliver up to us the Duilio and Dandolo, as 
the possession hv her of those redoubtable ironclads is manifestly incon- 
sistent with and dangerous to British interests on all waters navigable by 
men-of-war. On refusal of these moderate and reasonable conditions, war 
to be declared instanter. 4th. An ultimatum to Austria to detach herself 
immediately from that combination known as the Three Emperors' League, 
but which in reality likewise includes Italy, and to give her moral support 
to Turkey, as the course she has hitherto pursued is obviously inconsistent 
with British interests, which are identical with Turkish interests. The 
rejection of this friendly invitation to entail a declaration of war. 5th. 
An ultimatum to Spain not to increase her armed fleet in the Mediterra- 
nean, nor to send men-of-war thither from elsewhere through the Strait 
of Gibraltar, and to solemnly and formally renounce and give up forever- 
more all wishes, longings, or cravings to repossess that rock, as the con- 
trary must of necessity affect British interests injuriously under a variety 
of circumstances too obvious to render specification requisite. As before, 
war in default. _6th. An ultimatum to Russia not to cross the Balkans or 
proceedfurther in Armenia, to retire altogether from Central Asia, and 
not to cite the precedent of Germany occupying and dictating peace in 
Paris in her war with France as a justification for making peace with 
Turkey in Constantinople should the Sultan be ill-advised enough to pro- 
long a hopeless resistance until the invaders are ready to enter his capital. 
Refusal to be visited with the like penalty as in the preceding cases. 7th. 
An ultimatum to Turkey to cede the Euphrates Valley to England, and 
to construct a railway through it for the conveyance of British armies to 
India, and to guard that railway from attack with a double line of fort- 
resses and garrisons supplied by Turkey herself, as otherwise British in- 
terests would be manifestly in danger. Lastly, Turkey to cede Egypt to 
England.as the possession of it bv any other Power, or its independence, 
would evidently militate against British interests, which can never be per- 
fectly safe, as they ought to be, if any one of our roads to India lies 
through the territories of some other Power, who might bar the way her- 
self, or whose enemies might do so on invading or conquering her. In 
ease of an ill-judged refusal, war to be at once declared against Turkey. 
8th. An ultimatum to the United States not to increase their armaments 
by sea or hind, as this would place British interests as regards our Amer- 
ican possessions, whether on the continent or in the adjacent islands, in 
manifest jeopardy. War to enforce compliance, if necessary, as before, 
pth. An ultimatum to China to discontinue the introduction, whether by- 
importation or native manufacture, of European arms, weapons, and war 
vessels into her army and navy, and to return to bows and arrows and 
sailing jnnks ; to discontinue the use of European discipline and drill, 
whether taught by native or foreign officers ; and not to approach India 
on pretence of conquering Kashgaria or otherwise ; as all these things are 
obviously dangerous to British interests iu China, India, or elsewhere. 
War jn default. 10th. An ultimatum to Japan to retake Saghalien from 
Russia, as the possession of that island by the Czar might become a serious 
menace to British interests if we ever found it desirable to add to Aus- 
tralia, New Zealand, India, our Chinese Settlements, and our other 
Asiatic possessions, the acquisition of the Japanese Isles, which, being 
the analogue in the Far East of the British Isles in the West, ought ob- 
viously to belong to us. In default, the like penalty as in the other cases. 

LIME-BATING MAN. 

Dr. Wilkes, in his recent work on Physiology, remarks that, "It is 
estimated that the bones of every adult person require to be fed with lime 
enough to make a marble mantle every eight months." It will be per- 
ceived, therefore, that in the course of about ten years each of us eats 
three or four mantel-pieces, and a few sets of front door steps. And in 
a long life I suppose it is fair to estimate that a healthy American could 
devour the Capitol at Washington, and perhaps two or three medium- 
sized quarries besides. It is awful to think of the consequences if a man 
should be shut off from his supply of lime for a while and then should 
get loose in a cemetery. An ordinary tombstone would hardly be enough 
for a lunch for him. 

A Yankee editor wishes to know whether the law recently enacted 
against the carrying of deadly weapons applies to doctors who carry pills 
in their pockets. 



Savings and Loan. 



SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 
619 Clay Street 

At ii meeting of flip Board of l»l rector*, held (III* day, a 
4 alghl (81 per oenl per tnnum 

-■i, t ii Aepoelle, lor tin- si\ months ending Dooom tjrsble on 

and after the lMh hnrtsnl OYROfl W. carman. 

San Francisco. January 8, 1878. Jan. 12. 

THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

D< ii Iselio Spar u ml l.i-l him II I* . No B36 «'u1 i I or 11 In st nol . Nil 11 
Pmnchno OmosRs: President I. QOTTIG Boaso or Dmsoroae.— Fred 
I.Chaa Kohler, Dan. Mover, Bd w. K nine, George H Bvgsra 
N. Vim Rergen, H. L. Simon. Secretary, GEO. LETTE ; Attorney, JOHN K. 
JARBOE. July 21. 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANE —GUARANTEE CAPITAL, 9300,000. 

Officers: President. John Parrott ; V Ice- President, Jerome 
Lincoln ; s» m iir\ , \V S Junes ; Attorney, Sidney V. Smith. Loans ntadoon 
Real Estate and other Approved Securities. Offico : No. 215 Sansome street, San 
Francisco. Oct. 14. 

FRENCH SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 
Bnsh street, above Kearny, O. Mahe, Director. Loans 

made on real estate and other collateral securities at current rates of 



411 

interest. 



TEN PER CENT. FIBST MORTGAGE BONDS AT PAB. 

The Sierra Flume and Lumber Company have mortirajsed 
their large property — principilly lauds — to secure the payment of 1,200 Bonds 
of |)00 e loh, running for one, two or three years, and bearing - ten per cent, interest, 
payabte semi-annually. Two hundred Bonds of either series are now offered for sale 
at par, to close this season's business. The remainder will bo held for another year. 
The property cost over 81,400,000, and has produced the last six months $800,000 
worth of lumber, at a cost of $400,000, most of which is stacked and drying", to bo in 
readiness for sale, and for which there is a good market, both at homo and abroad, 
Mr. Alvinza Hayward, being the chief owner, will give a written guarantee that the 
Bonds and interest will be paid at maturity. Merchants' Exchange Bank Stock will 
be taken in exchange at §75 per share. For Bonds and further particulars apply to 
R. G. SNEATH, President S. F. and L. Co., 
Nov. 17. 423 California street, San Francisco. 

NOW READY! 

HINTQN'S NEW MAP OF ARIZONA. 

Invalnable for the traveler, prospector and miner. Con- 
tains all the latest mining districts, locations, U. S. Surveys, etc. Price lower 
than other maps. 

Colored, on rollers ?2 50. | Do. for pocket, in covers $1 50. 

NEARLY READY, 
Million's Hand-Book of Arizona I 
Four hundred pages, three new maps, seventy illustrations. Orders received by 
the publishers. PAYOT, UPHAM &CO., San Francisco, 

Jan. 12. AMERICAN NEWS CO., Now York. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Masonic Savings and Loan Bank, No. 6 Post street, Ufa- 
sonic Temple, San Francisco. — At a meeting of the Board of Directors of this 
Bank, hold January 2 1st, 1878, a dividend was declared at the rate of eight (8) per 
cent, per annum on Term Deposits, and six and three-tenths (6 3-10) per cent, per 
annum on Ordinary Deposits, for the semi-annual term ending January 28th, 1878, 
pavable on and after January 28th, 1878, free of Federal Tax. 
January 21, 1878. [Jan. 26.] H. T. GRAVES, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The German Savings and r.oan Society. —For the half year 
ending this date, the Board of Directors of the German Savings and Loan So- 
ciety has declared the Dividend on Term Deposits at the rate of eight and two-fifths 
(3 2-5) per cent, per annum, and on Ordinary Deposits at the rate of seven (7) per 
cent, per annum, free from Federal Taxes, and payable on and after the 15th day of 
Januarv, 1878. By order, GEORGE LETTE, Secretary. 
S an Francisco, December 31, 1877. Jan. 5. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The French Saving's and I«oan Society has declared a Div- 
idend of Eight (8) per cent, per annum, free of Federal Tax, for tho half year 
ending December 31st, 1877, payable on and after January 18th, 1878. Bv order. 
Jan. 19. GUSTAVE MAKE, Director. 

STOCK ^OLD'EBS' MEETING. 

Office of the Snlphnr Banh Quicksilver Milling' Company.— 
An adjourned meeting of the stockholders of the Sulphur Bank Quicksilver 
Mining Company will be held at the office of the Company, No. 220 Sansome street, 
in the city of San Francisco, MONDAY, February 4th, at 2 o'clock p.m., for the pur- 
pose of electing a Board of Directors, and for the transaction of any other businesB 
which may be brought up. LUCIEN HERMANN, Secretary. 

San Francisco, January 2d, 1878. Jan. 5. 

COKE CHEAPEST FUEL. 

Rod notion in Price : Wholesale Price, 50 cents per barrel ; 
Retail Price. 60 cents per barrel, at the works of the SAN FRANCISCO GAS- 
LIGHT COMPANY, Howard and First streets, and foot of Second st. Jan. 12. 

SILVER KING NOBTH MINING COMPANY, 

Pinal County, Arizona. 

Office: Boom 36, No. 330 Pine St. (Academy Building:), S. F. 

[August 18.] 



ASHTON'S LIVEBP0OL SALT. 

This celebrated brand of Salt has heeu in constant nse for 
more than half a century in the Eastern States, where for dairy purposes it 
commands double the price of any other brand of Liverpool Salt. The undersigned 
ure sole agents here, and offer it to the trade. WILLIAMS, BLANCH ARD & CO. , 
Jan. 5. 218 California street. 

FBANK KENNEDY, 

Law Office, 604 Merchant Street. — Probate. I>ivoroe. Bank- 
ruptcy, and other cases attended to. Rents, and all other demands, collected. 
Bad tenants ousted. Charge taken of real estate for residents, or absentees. Charges 
very reasonable. Jan. 12. 

9400,000 TO LOAN 

On City and Country Beal Estate. $350,000 to loan on Gas, 
Water, Bank, Railroad and other securities. Mercantile Paper discounted and 
money loaned upon all kinds of collateral security. 
August 18. JOHN T. LITTLE, 412 Montgomery street 



SA1ST FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Feb. 2, 1878. 



Theatrical, Etc. 



Herold's Second Matinee. —The attendance at the Metropolitan 
Temple last Wednesday afternoon was an improvement on the previous 
week and, as fresh subscriptions are daily coming in, the series promises 
to end as brilliantly as the best attended concerts in Piatt s Hall two 
vears ago. Last week we called special attention to the apathy ot tne 
musical public in coming forward to support Mr. Herold's enterprise, and 
we repeat our statement, that if his orchestra of fifty-two performers were 
properly appreciated in San Francisco, there would not be a single family 
absent which pretends to appreciate good music and desires to imbue the 
rising generation with a love of good and beautiful music. This week we 
desire to notice another wretched impediment to the success of classical 
music in San Francisco. The theatrical critics of the daily papers are 
also the musical critics, and, almost without exception, they are as igno- 
rant of the great works they criticise as a hod-carrier is of chemistry. It 
is not the fault of these gentlemen that they have to write notices of Kel- 
logg Di Murska, Anna Mehlig, or the Orchestral Concerts now being 
given— it is their misfortune. But long use has rendered them indifferent 
to the undertaking, and they write "a hole" through the orchestration 
of Haydn or Beethoven just as glibly as they criticise a low comedian or 
a poor ballet dancer. Until the daily papers employ competent musical 
critics it is idle to expect competent musical criticism. "We do not pre- 
tend that Mr. HeroloYs orchestra is perfect. Its members play too much 
dance music for a living, to be able to devote the necessary time to Mo- 
zart, Schumann and Liszt. When, however, the San Francisco public 
wakes up to the knowledge of the huge importance of hearing the works 
of great masters, then it will be time to analyze the existing defects of the 
only great orchestra we have in our midst. We are promised next 
Wednesday, as a piece de resistance, Les Preludes, Poeme Syniphonique, by 
Liszt. Probably all the musical critics of the daily press have heard it 
scores of times. We have not, but hope to. Mendelssohn's " Calm Sea" 
overture, which was given, we believe, once before last year, will be re- 

Seated, and there is also on the programme a capricio for three violins, a 
Einuet of Bocherini's for strings, besides the introduction to the third act 
of Lohengrin, and two lighter numbers. 

Bush Street Theater.— Madam Rentz's Female Minstrel Troupe 
opened here on Monday evening last, and the crowded houses they have 
enjoyed ever since proves this to be another one of " Lucky Locke's" 
successful ventures. The performances of this organization do not admit 
of much criticism. Eight or ten handsomely formed ladies of the variety 
ball type go through an ordinary variety hall performance, in which they 
are assisted by a couple of very clever song and dance men, Lester and 
Allen, and Miss Rosseta Leonie, a most daring and graceful as well as ex- 
ceptionally symetrical trapeze performer. Some moderate degree of 
merit attaches to several of the acts, but unquestionably not_ sufficient to 
crowd the houses so entirely with the sterner sex each evening. In the 
lavish display of personal charms, not to say the semi-nudity of the fe- 
males of the troupe, lies the attaaction. In fact the great "card " of this 
not very highly elevating entertainment is a Miss Montague, whose at- 
tractions both as to face and figure are undeniably strong, but whose cos- 
tumes suggests nothing so much as the Garden of Eden, and that at a 
period when the fig leaveB were anything but full grown. 

Schmidt Quintette Musical Recital, — The first concert of the sec- 
ond subscription series was given last night before an attentive and de- 
lighted audience. The large attendance upon these excellent entertain- 
ments is a credit to our city, and speaks well for the musical appreciation 
of our public. A quintette by Raff, Op. 107, was the principal feature 
of the concert, drawing forth well merited applause. Mr. Ernst Schmidt 
played a solo for the violoncello, by Grutzmache, in a masterly manner, 
and well deserved the recall he received. Mr. Louis Schmidt, Jr., added 
another laurel to his crown by his wonderful rendition of Vieuxtemps' 
Fantasia Appassionata. This young man is destined to become one of the 
leading violinists of the age. Mrs. Henry Norton sang an Ave Maria by 
Luzzi, and Clay's beautiful ballad, "She Wandered down the River 
Side," with marvelous sweetness and grace, and was rapturously encored 
in each. Altogether, the concert was one of the most charming ever 
given in the city. The next one takes place on February 15th. 

Grand Opera House. — The Poor and Proud of a Great City, a play of 
the " Under the Gas-light " type, of which there is little to be said, ex- 
cept that it presents ' some of the often presented aspects of life in the 
Atlantic metropolis. The text of the play is not remarkable for any par- 
ticular merit or originality, and the different characters can claim the 
same want of distinctive individuality. In fact, the company appear, as 
a whole, to very little advantage in the piece throughout. The next at- 
traction at this house is the perennially recurring Uncle Tom's Cabin, 
which has just proved such a bonanza to some Philadelphia managers. 
It will be produced here in the same perfect and ultra-realistic style, and 
may safely count upon attracting public attention, not only from the 
play's intrinsic popularity, but as well from the unique and taking acces- 
sories now in preparation. 

Baldwin's—Fred. Lyster announces a season of opera bouffe at this 
house, with Miss Catherine Lewis as the leading attraction. Miss Lewis 
is a sweet singer, charming actress, and a lady who has made many 
friends during her short residence amongst us. Miss Hattie Moore, late 
of the Richings-Bernard troupe; Miss Marian Singer, Miss Dora Visce- 
nia, Messrs. Harry Gates, Haydon Pilla, W. H. Kinross and J. A. Dau- 
phin are members of the company. Madame AngoVs DaugMer, with 
Miss Lewis as "Clairette," will be produced Monday night. 

A matinee for Young Folks at Metropolitan Temple this afternoon, at 
2 o'clock. On this occasion Captain B. F. Osbon proposes to tell "An 
Old Sailor's Yarns," He professes to have had long and varied nautical 
experience, and we know that he has been editor of a nautical gazette; 
hence he may be able to deliver an interesting discourse. 

California Theater. — To-night closes the third week's successful run 
of A Trip to the Moon, and which has been both an artistic and financial 
success. On Monday Signor Majeroni, the Italian actor, who comes to 
us with such golden opinions from Australia, opens in The Old Coporal, 
supported by the regular company. 

Baldwin's this Evening. — Mr. George Bates is to be the recipient of 
a complimentary benefit, this evening, tendered by his former and presen 
pupils, assisted by a lady amateur. The programme is a good one. 



WHY, WHEN AND HOW TO GET A HOMESTEAD LOT. 
It is very certain that a homestead lot is the very best investment 
that can be made in these or any other times. It is especially so in this 
city. San Francisco is growing apace. Population is rapidly increasing, 
and is bound to continue in an ever-extending ratio. The position of our 
city is bound to insure for it a great future. Not many years hence it 
will contain a population of a million. With great resources on every 
hand, with commerce teeming into our port, and the wealth of Arizona 
and Mexico tapped by the railroad and brought to our doors, no city in 
the Union has a more certain and pronounced future. That being so, 
real estate is to-day the safest, best, and in the end the most profitable 
investment a man can possibly make hereabouts. Savings Banks may be 
badly managed and fail, but real estate cannot be run away with by de- 
faulting agents. It remains and increases in value with the city's growth;. 
It has been the experience everywhere and always, that the purchase of 
a homestead in a growing city is the most productive and most satisfac- 
tory of all investments. Never was there a better time to buy in this 
city than now. Real estate is cheaper to-day than it ever will be again. 
Those who have money in Savings Banks, or those who have recently 
withdrawn their money, could not possibly do better than buy a lot right 
now. They will have an exceptionally good opportunity to do so on 
Thursday week, the 14th of February. On that day the Real Estate As- 
sociates, through their auctioneer, Mr. J. 0. Eldridge, will offer for sale 
splendid homestead lots in all parts of the city. The catalogue is too long 
for us to reprint, but it can be obtained at the office of the "Associates," 
or from the auctioneer, and ought to be attentively perused by intending 
buyers. The terms are easy, being one-lifth cash, the balance on the 
well and favorably known credit system adopted by the Real Estate 
Associates. 

WORTH ATTENTION. 

What lady reading the advertisement of J. J. O'Brien, and seeing the 
display of goods at " The Arcade," on Market street, adjoining the Bald- 
win, can fail to appreciate the advantages of purchasing at that es- 
tablishment ? Every conceivable style of dress goods are there to be had, 
and at prices ridiculously low. Indeed, the wonder is, when examining 
the material, where the profit comes in. Think of it ! Heavy black silks 
at 75 cents a yard, superfine black silk velvet, 27 inches wide, at $8 per 
yard, and other styles at proportionate prices. It is the same with woolen 
fabrics and domestic goods, the prices are all down, down, down, down, 
and it appears to us that now is the time, and " the Arcade," the place, 
wherein housekeepers and others can procure all they need with profit to 
themselves, rather than to the merchant. We could go on through the 
entire list of the goods to be found at J. J. O'Brien's, and give the figures 
at which they will be sold, and we venture to assert, that in every instance 
the price will be lower than they ever were offered at before in this city, 
when the quality of the goods is taken into consideration. Gentlemen, 
also, will find it greatly to their advantage, to look in at the " Arcade." 
The assortment of underclothing is very large and varied, and what is the 
use, wherein is the profit, of paying five dollars for an article of under- 
clothing, when the very same in every particular can be had at O'Brien's 
tor two dollars and a half, or less? We can only say go and see and ex- 
amine for yourselves, for we are well satisfied what the result will be 
after you follow this advice. You will have procured just what you 
wanted. You will have saved money, and you will leave "The Arcade" 
well satisfied with yourself, which is the best of all. 



TAKING THE PROBLEM INTO THEIR OWN HANDS. - 
It would seem as if the business men of the East were about to take 
the silver problem into their own hands. They are naturally opposed to 
the legislation upon which Congress seems bent. They realize that a 
great commercial country like this cannot do business on a silver basis, 
whilst all other nations with which it has trade relations accept only 
gold. This has caused them to turn their eyes towards California, and 
examine into our j>ractice of making special contracts in gold. If that 
method should be very generally adopted in the Eastern States, its effect 
would be to neutralize the proceedings of the silver inflationists. If Con- 
gress were not in session, we should be on the very verge of specie pay- 
ments. It was only 1£ per cent. off. When paper and gold are at par 
specie payment is as good as realized. A vigorous and united effort on 
the part of the people in the Eastera States would accomplish it now. It 
is within their power to deprive Congress of the control of the finances of 
the country, which it is now exercising to its great detriment. It ought 
not to be very difficult, nor to cause any great strain to get over this small 
gap of 1&@1§ per cent., seeing that they have already traveled all the way 
up from 40 cents on the dollar to 98£ cents. 



OUR CHARITIES. 

Credit is due to Supervisor Gibbs for the attention he bestows upon 
his duties in connection with the Health Committee. He stated in his 
argument before the Committee upon Amendments, favoring an increase 
of Hospital and Almshouse appropriations, that the number of inmatesat 
these institutions had increased from 30 to 40 per cent, during the past 
year, and hence a heavier demand was made upon the fund. The Super- 
visors said both the Almshouse and Hospital were admirably and eco- 
nomically conducted, and that Superintendent Keating and Dr. Bryan 
deserved great credit. To show the difference in one item of expenditure 
at the Hospital, between the present time and a couple of years ago, Mr. 
Gibbs said the liquors furnished to the Hospital during the past year cost 
about $1,400, while under a previous management they cost over $10,000 
for the same length of time. The Committee were of the opinion that the 
increased appropriations were actually necessary, and agreed to report 
favorably on the resolution. 

The Canadian Monthly for January, continues William Black's 
serial novel, followed by an interesting notice of a portion of unknown 
Canada, from the phosphate country to the desert. Buddha and Buddhism 
is a very well written eulogy of Gautama Buddha. A rather poor attempt 
at wit by Mark Twain, is succeeded by the always well written " Round 
the Table." 

Krug Champagne.— Private Cuvee, in quarts and pints ; Shield— 
Krug — in quarts and pints ; Premiere Qualite, in quarts and pints. For 
sale by Hellman Bros. & Co., corner Front and Jackson. 



2, 1878. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



SIGNAL SERVICE METEOROLOOICAL REPORT. WEES 

ENDIJJO JAN. 31, 1878. SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 

lli-jhrtl and l**trr»t Htirinnftrr. 



Prl. 2S. S»t. 28 Sun 27 If an. 28 Tuo. 20 Wed30 Thr31 



KM 



»> .19 90.11 50 1(1 SOW SO.OI 

SOU | J».M | 90.07 SU.8I 29. T8 

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U M 

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83 | 87 | SO 
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SE. | N. , 
Wtmd—MtUt Trnrclrd. 
lit | • SOS I n 
Mat, ../- HVafArr. 
Fair. | Rainy. I Itainv. I Mr. I Rainy. 

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.Oi I .13 | 1.13 | .17 | "J 1 



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BB. 

147 



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30.17 
30.01 



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w. 



Fair. — Fair. 



I 



Total Ruin Itttrimj Sm*i>n f»-?/f""'".7 •fitly t f 1877 ■ .M ST tnchtt. 



SANITARY NOTES 
Ninety-fonr deaths occurred this «. ek, u oonund with 101 last, 
of irbich 6 only were » !hineea. There were 35 under 6 years, 14 between 
6 and 30 jreara. 39 between 90 end 60, and 6 over 60 years. Typhoid fever 
h represented by 2 : diphtheria. 11 ; measles, .'* ; scarlatina, 1. There is 
a burse inerease of pneumonia, from -1 last to 12 this week. Consumption 
has also increased From 9 last t.'> 19 this week. There were 5 deaths from 
heart disease, l from aneurism, 1 from alcoholism, 1 from paralysis. 
Then- were 2 aocidenta] deaths and 1 suicide. The city remains free from 
■mall-pox. The report of deaths in 1877 is te hand. There were 1,629 zy- 
motics, 822 e institutional, 1784 losal, 578 developmental, and 257 deaths 
from violence ; 389 < •hineee, and a total of 5,605. These figures compare 
tavorably with 1876, regard being had to the growth of population. There 
were 206 less deaths from small-pox, lint the gain was over-balanced by 
the increase of diphtheria, of which 7iM died, as compared with 481 the 
previous year. The Chinese mortality was much below that of 1876, viz: 
889 as against 685. The annual rate for the white population is 19.00 per 
thousand : and for the Chinese, 12.8 per thousand. Amongst the whites 
there is a slight decrease in cancer, and considerable increase in diseases 
of the stomach, liver and bowels. There were 85 suicides. 

IT IS SAID 

That it is proposed to fill up the space between the summit of X&incon 
Hill and the summit of Telegraph Hill with sand, and then pave it with 
granite. When the job is completed, work will be found for a large num- 
berof men in keeping the pavement in proper condition. That the Pacific 
Mail Steamship Co. intend shortly to run three steamers a month between 
San Francisco and New York, via the Isthmus, instead of two, aa at 
present; and That, notwithstanding the increase of business, freights will 
be handled with more care on the Isthmus in the future than has been 
the case heretofore. There was room for improvement. That Wm. 
P. Clyde, President of the P. M. S. S. Co., has leased or chartered for 
fifteen years, the steamers South Carolina, Georgia, and Crescent City, in 
order to have ships enough for the service. That the farmers throughout 
the country have had all the rain necessary to secure a big crop. We 
believe it. Tlint the present leader of the Workingmen's party will soon 
be "tired out," in order to make room for one who will cause the move- 
ment to be looked upon with some respect by those who control the 
money bags. Will the Chronicle permit it? That Capt. W. F. Lapidge 
has been promised another command in the Pacific Mail Co.'s service. 
We know that a strong effort has been made in his favor by our most in- 
fluential citizens, which we hope will be successful. That Pickering and 
Fitch were much disgusted at the Chronicle's success in obtaining Miss 
McCormick'a evidence in the Fifteenth District Court, notwithstanding 
that reporters and others were excluded. That they will probably vent 
their spleen in several leading- articles on the subject. T/tat the Herald- 
Mail, if conducted properly, would soon become the organ of our respect- 
able workingraen, and would exercise a power in the land, and have an 
influence for good. It should avoid personalities, and study only the in- 
terests of the class by whom it is conducted. That David Bush will not 
be successful in finding one hundred men who will subscribe fifty dollars 
each to make a fund of 85,000, for the relief of destitute workingmen. 
We don't believe it. We think he will; and God speed him in his good 
work say we. T/tat at the present time the increase in the amount of 
water at all the sources of supply of the Spring Valley Water Works, 
reaches the enormous amount of three thousand million of gallons. 



They are rapidly becoming civilized, or rather Americanized, in Sa- 
moa. A man named Fox was murdered in a public house by one Corco- 
ran, and after the murderer was put on board an American vessel for con- 
veyance to the United States, the regulators on shore determined that the 
natives should be treated to a sight of the method sometimes adopted in 
this country when Judge and jury are deemed unnecessary. The poor 
wretch was brought on shore, he was then allowed the spiritual consola- 
tion of a missionary, and after this formality a cocoanut tree was made to 
serve the purpose of a gallows, and a double block and tackle answered 
for a hangman's rope. They certainly mean business in Samoa, and the 
rapid progress they are evidently making in the manners and customs of 
our people, clearly indicates that the treaty recently made is not untimely 
nor out of place. The natives must have been highly entertained at this 
exhibition of summary punishment, and we trust that the body was prop- 
erly disposed of, and not permitted to fall into the hands of those who 
still have a hankering after human flesh. 



"The Unpardonable Sin. "—This is the theme chosen by Rev. Wm. 
A. Scott, D. D., L.L. D., for his next Sunday evening discourse. Dr. 
Scott will also preach at 11 o'clock a. ST., in St. John's Presbyterian 
Church, Post street, and to which the public are cordially invited to at- 
tend. Sunday school and Bible classes, 9£ a. m. Praise service, 6^ p. M. 



M 



GRAND OPERA HOUSE, 

l«lon Slrvt'l. Ih-1 »•-••.! Ilitr.l nil |'oiirtll.-M. A. lit n- 

■ nlnvT, Fob. -M, Benefit 1 <■( K 
■ \ ami i "it ti* Vcl ol RICHARD III " Richard 
111.," T. u h i ; enlnjj, February Sth, 

HIS i "Ms CABIN, with over 

i the Qraat Plantation Scene. ThUProd 

will Mir. ONLY I'lMlK AM) 



PKUUD MATIN I 



Feb. I 



SCHMIDT QUINTETTE MUSICAL RECITALS. 

Second Subscription Series. 

MERCANTILE LIBRARY HALL. 

Second (onrcrl, Frl;hiy. February I51li. Mis* Alice Schmidt, 
Pianoforte: MR. LOUH SCHMIDT, JR., ami MR. CLIFFORD SCHMIDT 
Holme; Ml! LOUIS SCHMIDT, Viola; and MR, ERNST SCHMIDT, Violoncello. 
Asalated bj MRS. HENRY NORTON, Soprano BubscrlpUoii List open at Cray's 
Mush si. ire Box Office open for reservation of scats on the morning of the Concert. 

BUSH STREET THEATER. 

Clharles E. Locke, lie— 66 s Frank I.awlor, Acting* Manager. 
j Kvirv evening until further notice, and Matlneea Saturday. Tremendous Suc- 
cess of America's Most Refined and Pleasing Novell*, MADAME RENTZ'S ORIGINAL 
FEMALE MINSTRELS, and MABELKANTleY's LONDON BURLESQUE TROUPE, 
augmented hi ;i superior corps cf Twenty-five Specialty Artists. PRICES A9 USUAL. 
Reserved Seats secured in advance at the Bos Office tor any night, including Sunday, 
also tor tin Saturday Matinee. Feb, 2. 

BALDWIN'S THEATER. 

Saturday Evening:, February 2d, Compllmenta. -y Benefit 
tendered to MR, GEORGE BATES, by his Parmer and Present Pupils. The 

performance will consist of the K Hi Act of THE MERCHANT OP VENICE, the- 

Dagger Scene from THE WIFE, the Interlude ol diamond CUT DIAMOND, the 
Fifth Act «>f RICHARD 111., anil the Faroe Of IC1 ON PARLE FRANCA1S. Admis- 
sion to all parts of the house, $1. Reserved Seats, 50 cents extra, which can be pro- 
cured at Sherman & Hyde's. Feb. 2. 

CALIFORNIA THEATER. 

Bnsh Street, above Kearny, --.folin ltfcCnllou^h, Proprietor 
ami Manager ; Barton Hill. Acting Manager. This (Saturday) Evening, 
last night of Offenbach's successful Opera Bouffe, A TRIP TO THE MOON. Last 
night of Do Rosa, Palladino, the Ki rally Ballet Troupe, the Ulm Sisters, the Vaidis 
Sisters, and Voegtlin's Magnificent Scenery. LAST TRIP TO THE MOONMATINEE 
this (Saturday) Afternoon at 2 o'clock. Monday Evening, Feb. 4th— Engagement of 
the lircat Indian Actor, SlUNoR EDl/ARDo M AJERoNl, as THE O LD CORPORAL. 

BALDWIN'S THEATER. 

Thomas Ufagnlre, Manager; Fred. Lyster, Hi rector.* -The 
Management ha-i the pleasure to announce the first appearance of MISS CATH- 
ERINE LEWIS in Opera Bouffe, supported by Miss Hattie Moore, Miss Marian Singer, 
Miss Dora Visciuia, Mr. Harry Gates, Mr. Haydon Tilla, Mr. W. H. Kinross, and Mr. 
J. A. Dauphin. Grand Chorus and orchestra. Monday Evening, February 4th, and 
during the week, LA FILLE DE MME. ANGOT. " Clarettc," Miss Catherine Lewis. 
Box Sheet now open. Feb. 2. 

R. HEROLD'S THIRD ORCHESTRAL MATINEE 

Will take place at the Metropolitan Temple, Fifth street, 
near Market, on WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON February 6th, at 3 o'eloek P.M. 
Bsx Sheet will open on TUESDAY and WEDNESDAY, February 6th and 6th, at 
Grav's Music Store, 105 Kearny street. CHARLES SCHUTZ, 
Feb. 2. . Business Mana ger. 

EMERSON'S OPERA HOUSE. 
Ilosed In consequence of an In junction on the Comedy of 

BABY ! Due Notice will be given of the OPENING. Feb. 2. 



C 



S. P. R. R— NORTHERN DIVISION. 

Excursion Season, 187S.--Reduction in Bates. --Special No- 
tice to Military Companies, Sunday Schools, Societies, Private Parties, etc. 
The Southern Pacific Railroad Company is now prepared to make engagements for 
the transportation of Excursion Parties to the various well-known Picnic Grounds on 
the line of its read. For Rites, Terms, and other information, apply at Room 33, 
Railroad Building, corner Fourth and Townsend streets. 

H. R. JUDAH, Assistant Passenger and Ticket Agent. 
A. C. Bassett, Superinten dent, Feb. 2. 

ODD FELLOWS' SAVINGS BANK. 

Election Notice— Notice is hereby given that the annnal 
meeting of the members of the Odd Fellows' Savings Bank, for the election of 
Directors of said bank for the ensuing year, will be held at the office of the bank, 
Room No. 2, Odd Fellows' Hall, No. 325 Montgomery street, on MONDAY, February 
11, A. D. 1878. Polls to be opened at 7 o'clock p. m., and closed at 9 o'clock p. M. of 
that day. JAMES BENSON, Secretary. 

San Francisco, Jan. 30, 1S78. Feb. 2. 

INTERMEDIATE STEAMER FOR HONOLULU. 

The first-class Steamship " St. Paul** will perform the In- 
termediate Mail Service to HON *LULU on the following schedule : From SAN 
FRANCISCO— January 24th and February 19th From HONOLULU— February 5th 
and March 5th. For freight or passage, having superior accommodations, apply to 

WILLIAMS, BLANCHARD & CO., 
Feb. 2. 218 Californiastreet, or corner First and Brannan streets. 

$350 REWARD. 

Mayor's Office, San Francisco, January 30, 187S.--A reward 
of ¥250 is hereby offered for any information furnished to the Chief of Polico 
which will lead to the arrest and conviction of the person or persons who caused to 
be delivered at the house of August Drucker, EBq., ex-Supervisor of the First Ward, 
a package containing a mixture of gin and cyanide of potassium. 

Feb. 2. A. J. BRYANT, Mayor of the City and County of S. F. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
rilho If ibernia Savings ami Loan Society, Northeast Corner 

X Ol Montgomery and Post streets, San Francisco, January 25, 1878.— At a regu- 
lar meeting of the Hoard of Directors of the society, held this day, a dividend at the 
rate of 1\ per cent, per annum was declared on all deposits for the six months end- 
ing on tlie 21st inst., payable from and after this date, and free from Federal tax. 
Feb. 2. EDWARD MARTIN, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Office of the Lcetls Mining Company. Wo. 327 Pine street, 
San Francisco, January 25th, 1878.— At a meeting of the Board of Trustees of 
the above-named Company, held this day, a Dividend (No. 5) of Twenty Cents per 
share, was declared, payable on Thursday, January 31, 1S7S. Transfer books are 
closed until dividend is paid. [Feb. 2.] P. F. VERDENAL, Secretary. 

DON'T BE AFRAID! 

Bradley * Ralofson'a Elevator continnes to run, and Mr. 
RULOFSON is still at bis post, making the best Photographs in the United 
States. Come and see turn. Feb. 2. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Feb. 2, 1878. 



"The World," the Flesh, and the Devil. 

[ By a Truthful Penman.] 

The worthy ex-President Grant has arrived in due course from 
Palermo at Malta. His arrival, on the whole, was quite unexpected; but 
the Duke of Edinburgh., who was on board the Sultan, at once put off to 
the Vandalia, and welcomed the General to the island. Forthwith the 
hero — wno seems to be one of those fortunate men that can get a dinner 
or a luncheon or an illuminated address for the bare trouble of knocking 
at a city's gates— went through the usual round of entertainment. On 
the evening of the day of his appearance, he was invited to dinner on 
board the Sultan, and the following day the General and Mrs. Grant 
took luncheon at the palace of the Duke and Duchess of Edinburgh. The 
same evening saw the enterprising guest and suite at dinner with" the 
Governor, after which event they, of course, adjourned to the Opera. 
Here fresh glories awaited them. Curiously enough, the three most suc- 
cessful of the prime donne who have made their debut this season in Malta 
are all of American nationality. The trio accordingly, forming them- 
selves into a deputation, had waited on the gallant ex-President, and 
prayed his attendance at the Teatro Reale that evening. In honor, then, 
of this condescension, at the end of the first act of Lucia di Lammermoor, 
one of the Yankee artistes— the Signorina Giulia Valda — appeared on 
the stage, accompanied by a motley chorus of Maltese, and gave in ten- 
der yet strapping tones the " Star-spangled Banner," which is understood 
to be the National Hymn of the United States. The house cheered and 
encored vociferously, evidently in compliment to the visitor ; but against 
such blandishments that great man opposed a stern immovable front. It 
has been argued, with some show of reason, that a slight acknowledge- 
ment of the compliment on the part of the warrior would, perhaps, not 
have been altogether out of place. But not a muscle twitched. IN either 
to the bland coquetry of the dark-browed Valda, nor the applauding au- 
dience, did he vouchsafe the most distant bow. His face shrouded in 
stolidity and his beard, the General sat through the storm, patient, en- 
during, adipose ; and when this, our latest news of the big man, was 
posted in Malta, he was " left sitting." Time, 10p.m.. December 29.—— 
Emperor of Russia, you are a great and holy man, and your desire is to 
be kind to all those who execute your will! The resources of your Em- 
pire have, we know, been severely tried by this war ; but there must be 
surely enough remaining to provide Count Schouvaloff with a better 
horse. Sire, it is our duty to make known to you that your Ambassador 
at this Court rides an iron-gray animal which he presumably bought out 
of a bathing-machine at Brighton, where he has recently been staying. 
Let him not be crowed over by Count Beust with his long-tailed Arab, 
or Count Minister with his sturdy chestnut. Montgelas mocks himself 
at him, and Menabrea laughs him to the nose. Even if straightened cir- 
cumstances prevent the purchase of a new horse, arrangements might 
surely be made with Sir Richard King to let the Count have the use of 
his little pony when Colonel Bigge was not riding it. — Atlas.-^Wh&t is 
this we hear about Kron-Prinz Rudolf and our own Princess Beatrice ? 
But how, worthy friends, can such a match be possible, howevor appro- 
priate the ages, when there is the insurmountable barrier of the Prince's 
being a Catholic to be overcome ? By the way, we hear that the Prince 
is not allowed to hunt, because of bis imnerial mother having come to 
grief across country so often that Kaiser Joseph is persuaded that hunt- 
ing is a far more dangerous pastime than it is in reality. But then if la- 
dies will try to show the best men in Leicestershire the way on weedy 
thoroughbreds, they must expect a cropper or two during tl leir apprentice- 
ship. -^—Apropos of the news of Lord Rosebery's approaching marriage, 
we believe we are correct in stating that Miss Hannah de Rothschild's 
fortune is estimated at three millions, and that it is settled on her. After 
the death of her mother, the Baroness Mayer, she withdrew most, if not 
all, of her money from the house. Miss Hannah de Rothschild under- 
takes the entire management of Mentmore and her other property, and 
is said to be an admirable woman of business. ^—Recently, I was per- 
sonally told, "without winking, without blinking, I do declare," by a 
well-known canon of the Church of England, and himself a graduate of 
the university of Oxford, that seven-tenths of the divinity professors, 
teachers, "coaches," and students at that place of "Holy Orders" be- 
lieve not in the devil or future rewards and punishments, and the re- 
mainder doubted the existence of God! Inquiring of another "brother 
in orders" if this were true, he replied, "Certainly! it is the greatest 
farce of the age to fancy for a moment that Oxford is the seat of learned 
Christianity!" — London Letter to Cincinnati Enquirer. -^The wicked do 
not prosper — oh, no! — and they don't live out half their days, but a gro- 
cer in Schenectady has been using false weights for eighteen years, and 
has laid up §67,000. He is now b'2 years old, and the healthiest man in 
town. _ It seems a strange coincidence that a man who has never been 
too-weighty with his goods should become eighty-two in his old age.^— 
In addition to the use of the telephone for military purposes in Germany, 
these instruments have been provided for telegraph operators at ten prin- 
cipal towns, and many more are being constructed. They are also in use 
between the General and the Director of Telegraphs, and of other high 
public officials. Experiments on a large scale between France and Ger- 
many are also^ being carried on.— —The last time this "infernal country" 
had a war with the Kaffirs, a certain slim gentleman wore the livery of 
the " accursed English," and did his duty as an officer at the Cape with 
unimpeachable loyalty and courage. That slim gentleman has since 
grown fat and foul-mouthed, and is given to harrangues compounded of 
naivete and bombast, whose inconsequent argumentation and very earnest 
blundering stand substitute for sense and humor. His drollery has been 
enjoyed because it was unconscious, and his hatred to England has been 
condoned because it was alcoholic ; but it is possible to play the ponder- 
ous aany too early in the day, and to carry the license of motley too far. 
One cannot be expected always to forgive a loose tongue for that the brain 
is disordered. Will Major O'Gorman, M.P., kindly take the hint, and, 
if possible, the pledge ? He ts too good a fellow at bottom to give those 
"accursed English " the chance of rejoicing at finding him at enmity 
with his better setf.-^World. 



Insurance. 



If those -women," remarks the Blmira Advertiser, speaking of a 
troupe of Thompsonian dancers, "think this is August, they are very 
much mistaken." Volumes could not say more. 



INSURANCE AGENCY OF 

HUTCHINSON & MANN 

NO 314 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 



Even P. T t Barnum, it seems, cannot die* 
terested in a flying machine. 



He is reported to be in- 



AQENT8 FOR TUB 

Girard Ins. Co Philadelphia, Pa. New Orleans Ins. Aes'n New Orleans. 

Union Ins. Co Galveston, Texas St. Paul F. & M. Ins. Co... St. Paul, Minn. 

Home Ins. Co Columbus, Ohio I Atlas Ins. Co Hartford Conn. 

People's InB. Co Newark, N. J. Revere Fire Ins. Co Boston. 

National L. I. Co., U. S. A..Wash'n, D. C. [Trade Ins. Co Camden, N. J. 

Capital Represented, Twelve Millions. 

POLICIES ISSUED ON DESIRABLE PROPERTY aT FAIR RATES. LOSSES 
EQUITABLY ADJUSTED AND PROMPTLY PAID. 

HUTCHINSON A MANN, General Agents^ 

May 5. 314 California street, San Francisco. 

HOME MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY OF CALIFORNIA. 

Principal Office, 406 California Street, San Francisco. 
Cash Assets, January 1, 1877, $595,291 ; Liabilities, $5,952; Surplus ft.r Policy 
Holders, §589,339. J. F. Houghton, President; Geo. H. Howard, Vice-President 
Charles JR. Story, Secretary. K. H. MAG1LL, H. H. BIGELOW, General Agents. 

Directors. — San Francisco — Geo. H. Howard, John H. Rcdington, J. F. Houghton 
R. B. Gray, Robert Watt, John Currey, L. L. Baker, W. F. Whittier, C. C. Burr, E. 
M. Root, W. H. White, J. L. N. Shepard, W. M. Greenwood, George S. Mann, Cyrus 
Wilson, W. T. Garratt, C. Waterhouse, A. P. Hotaling, A. Block, A. K. P. Harmou, 
G. S. Johnson, W. O. Wilson, A. W. Bowman, H. L. Dodge, Charles R. Story. Ala- 
meda County Branch — V. D. Moody, Chauncy Taylor, A. C. Henry, Robert S. Far- 
relly, Joseph B. Marlin, W. B. Hardy, T. B. Simpson. San Dieyu— A. H. Wilcox. 
Sacramento — Mark Hopkins, D. W. Earl, Julius W etzlar, James Carolan. San Jose — 
T. Ellard Beans, B. D. Murphy, A. Pfister, J. H. Dibble, J. S. Carter, Jackson Lewis, 
Jacob Rich, John Auzerais, John Balbach. Stockton — H. H. Hewlett, Chas. Belding, 
J. D. Peters, A. W. Simpson, H. M. Fanning. Marysville— D. E, Knight. Grass 
Valley— Wm. Watt, T. W. Sigoumey. Portland, Oregon— W. S. Ladd, U. H. Lewis, 
P. Wasserman, B. Goldsmith, D. Macleay. Virginia City, Nevada — John Gillig, Isaac 
L. Requa. March 17. 

FIRE AND MARINE INSURANCE.— UNION INS. CO. OF S. F. 

The California Lloyds.— Established in 1861.— JTos. 416 and 
418 California street. Cash capital ¥750,000 in Gold. Assets exceed §1,000,000 
Coin. Fair Rates ! Prompt Settlement of Loses ! ! Solid Security ! ! DIRECTORS. 
—San Francisco — J. Mora Moss, N. G. Kittle, M. J. O'Connor, R. S. Floyd, Moses 
Heller, Adam Grant, Daniel Meyer, Antoine Borel, Charles Kohler, Joseph Seller, 
1. Lawrence Pool, A. Weill, Joseph Brandcnstein, Charles Baum, James Molhtt, Ed- 
ward Cadwalader, Benjamin Brewster, L. Cunningham, W. M. Hoag, Nicholas Lu- 
lling, John Parrott, L. A. Booth, J. Baum, M. D. Sweeney, Bartlett Doe, Gustave 
Touchard, J. H. Baird, J. G. Kittle, George C. Hickox, C. Duconimun, Wm. Scholle, 
John Conly, I. Steinhart, N. B. Stone, J. O. Eldridge, A. B. Phipps, Jas. M. Goewey. 
GUSTAVE TOUCHARD, President. N. G. KITTLE, Vice-President. 

Chaei.es D. Haven, Secretary. Geo. T. Bohen, Surveyor. July 28. 

THE STATE INVESTMENT AND INSURANCE CO. 

HUE AND MARINE. 

S^ash Assets, $150.000.--- Principal Office, 218 and 220 San- 

\j some street, San Francisco. Officers: — Peter Donahue, President; A. J. 
Bryant, Vice-President; Charles H. Cushing, Secretary; H. H. Watson, Marine 
Surveyor. Board op Directors :-— Peter Donahue, James Irvine, C. D. O'Sullivan, 
A. Bocqueraz, R. Harrison, A. H. Rutherford, R. Bailey, E. W. Corbert, George O. 
McMullin, A. J. Bryant, Frank M. Pixley, E Burke, H. H. Watson, Dr. C. F. Buckley, 
P. J. White, W. A. Piper, M. Mayblum, Richard Ivers, John Rosenfeld, Daniel 
Callaghan. P. H. Russell, Sacramento. John G. Downey, Los Angeles. Wm. 
Hood, Sonoma County. H. W. Seale, Mayfield. Geo. Rutherford, San Jose. Feb. 13. 

OffFERIAL OF LONDON, NORTHERN OF .LONDON, AND 
QUEEN OF LIVERPOOL. 

Aggregate Cash Capital $33,000,000. 



Robert Dickson, Manager. 
July 14. 



W. LANE BOOKER, Agent and Attorney. 
317 California street, S. F. 



NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFE INSUEANCE CO., OF BOSTON, 

Has transacted the business of Life Insurance for nearly 
thirty-five years. Its assets amount to over Fourteen Million Dollars. The 
law of Massachusetts makes all its Policies nonforfeitable. It is a Purely Mutual Com- 
pany, dividing every cent of surplus among Policy-holders. This is the Only Com- 
pany on the Pacific Coast governed by the Massachusetts Lapse Law. This company 
has coniT.Med with the new Insurance Laws of California. 

WALLACE EVERSON, General Agent. 
Sept. 2-1.] 32S Montgomery street. 

THE SWISS MARINE INSURANCE COMPANIES COMBINED. 

Baloise, of Basle, Capital 5,000,000 francs; Helvetia, of 
St. Gall, Capital 10,000,000 francs ; Schweiz, of Zurich, Capital 5,000,000 francs. 
These three Companies are liable jointly and severally for all losses that may be sus- 
tained. Losses made payable in all the principal seaports of the world. In" the set- 
tlement of all claims under an English policy, our Companies will strictly adhere to 
the conditions and customs adopted at Lloyds, and submit to English jurisdiction. 
June 9. HENRY BALZER & CO., Agents, 213 Sansome st., S. F. 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INSURANCE CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 



C 



apital $5, OOO, 000. ---Agents: Balfour, Guthrie A- Co., No. 

230 California street, San Francisco. No. 18. 



1,000 SHARES OF STOCK IN THE PHCENIX GOLD MINE FOR SALE. 

The Mine is located in Amador county, Cal., on the great 
mother lode, near the old and famous Amador and Keystone mines ; has an 80 
Stamp Mill, Splendid Water Power, Canal and Timber Privileges, a 40-foot Ledge- 
explored to 1,100 feet in depth ; has paid over 1 per cent, per month on par the past 
year, and with present developments should pay 2 per cent, hereafter for many 
years. The Mine has no debt. Capital Stock, 10,000 shares of §100 each, and the 
proprietor, Mr. A. Hayward, now offers 1,000 shares at par, with the option (to orig- 
inal purchasers and not transferable) of returning their stock to him, on ninety days 
notice -at the expiration of six months— at cost, and 10 per cent, per annum interest, 
less dividends declared. Merchants' Exchange Bank Stock taken at §75 per share. 
Nov. 17.] Apply R. G. SNEATH, Agent, 423 California street. 

S10 TO S25 A DAT 

Sure made by Agents selling our Chronios, Crayons, and 
Reward, Motto, Scripture Text, Transparent, Picture and Chromo Cards. 100 
samples, worth §4, sent postpaid for 75 cents. Illustrated catalogue free. J. H. 
BUFFORD'S SONS, Boston. Established 1830. August 18. 



Feb. % 1878. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



~*l 



RECOLLECTIONa 
[bt h * » . oaboiii ro v.] 

1 together? 
■ 11 the homelj 
i r-niiil tin- houtfa in wintry weather? 
'i rrmrmber all the b*jJDJ n mtfl l fl l 
In siimin.r r veiling round Mm onsD OOOT— 
Kmtl took*, kind li»-.*rt«, kind wordi ud bandar prvvtings, 
And olaaping hnndi Woom pnlm baal n<> mora ? 
Do 3 on runomtw tnmn ? 

Do you rememWr all the marry Ian-liter ; 

Tlif voioM round tha awing in onr <>lil garden; 
Tin- dog that, when wi ran, still follow'd after; 

Tin- teasing frolic niro <>f speedy pardon t 
We von but ohildran Men, young, nappy creatures. 

And hanlly know how much we hod bo torn — 
But note the drenm Hhrn memory of those features. 

Domes back, and bias my darkened spirit muse, 
]>.» you remomlHT them? 
Do you rememU'r, when wo first departed 

From all too old oomponloni who wore round us, 
How von loon again we grow Ught'hearted, 

An 1 talked with nmflsaol all the links which bound us? 
And after, when onr footatepa wore roturning, 

Willi unfell weariness, o*or hill and plain. 
How <>iir young heart* kept boiling op, and burning, 

To think how Boon we'd be at noma again? 
!>>< yoo remember this? 
Do you remember how the dreams of glory 

Kept fading from us like a fairy treasure ; 
How we thought leSB of being famed in story, 

And more of those to whom our fame gave pleasure? 
Po yon remember in far countries, weeping, 

\Vhen a light breeze, a flower, hath brought to mind 
Old happy thoughts, which till that hour were sleeping, 

And made us yearn for those we left hehind ? 
Do you remember this ? 
Do you remember when no sound woke gladly, 

But desolate echoes through our home were ringing, 
How for a while we talked— thsn paused full sadly, 

Because our voices bitter thoughts were bringing ? 
Ah me! those days! my friends, my brother, 

Sit down, and let us talk of all our woe, 
For we have nothing left but one another ; 

Yet where they went, old playmate, ice shall go — 
Let us remember this. 



DEATH OF A NOTED SHOWMAN. 

Driesbach, the lion-tamer, is dead. He was upwards of seventy years 
of ago, and those who remember him in the hight of his fame are now past 
middle age. But in his day he had a reputation for power over fierce an- 
imals equal to that of Van Amburgh himself, and he had received sub- 
stantial marks of appreciation and admiration from every potentate in 
Europe, and many in Asia. Like the majority of wild-beast tamers, he 
was a German by birth, but, at a very early age, he was taken by his un- 
cle to America. He was apprenticed, while still a boy to a shoemaker, 
and even then gained a reputation by his daring acrobatic feats and his 
curious power of taming animals. He soon grew tired of Bhoemaking, 
and became a policeman in New York. Part of his duties as a policeman 
consisted in keeping order among the crowds who visited a well-known 
menagerie. His passion for wild animals was soon discovered by the pro- 
prietor of the menagerie, who induced him to leave the police force, and 
become one of the keepers at the menagerie. Within two years his mar- 
velous daring and skill as a tamer of beasits had made him famous, and his 
fame spread until it was world-wide. As an illustration of the extraordi- 
nary risks he ran, Driesbach used to tell the following story. He had at 
one time a favorite leopard, the tamest creature ever seen, and as gentle 
and docile as a child. Driesbach used to carry this leopard about on his 
Bhoulders, with its paws round his neck, and it used frequently to sleep 
by his aide. One day, Driesbach left the door of the leopard's cage open, 
and, lying down beneath the shade of a tree, fell asleep. He was woke 
by a sharp pain in his shoulder, and, opening his eyes, saw the leopard 
standing over him, its claws fixed in his shoulder, its eyes glaring, its 
fangB gleaming white as it snarled and growled in a terribly significant 
manner. The moment Driesbach opened his eyes, the leopard made a 
dash at his throat, but the lion-tamer was too quick for the beast. He 
thrust one hand far into its open jaws, and with the other gripped it by 
the throat. A fearful life and death struggle ensued ; but at last Dries- 
bach, who was a man of immense muscular power, fairly choked the 
leopard to death, and came off victorious, though shockingly mangled. 
After this display of treachery, he never trusted his pets too far, no mat- 
ter how tame and docile they might appear. The old lion-tamer died, 
"poor and contented," on a little farm which he had purchased for him- 
self in Ohio, out of the scanty savings of his adventurous career. For, 
like Blondin, he had been the victim of a bogus speculation, in which he 
had embarked the greater portion of the considerable fortune which he 
at one time possessed. — Coming Events. 

The Telephone at Aberdeen ~A series of interesting experiments 
with the telephone was most successfully conducted recently, by members 
of the engineering department of the Aberdeen telegraph office. Tele- 
phonic instruments were attached to the wires at Aberdeen and Banff, a 
distance of 52 miles apart, and songs were transmitted with remarkable 
clearness and distinctness along that distance, while conversation was 
freely carried on. The results are considered most remarkable, and with 
more complete arrangements than could be got at the time, even greater 
success is anticipated. Two of Professor Bell's telephones were used, and 
two which were made by Mr. W. T. Jones, one of the engineering staff, 
the latter having larger diaphragms or sounding plates than the former, 
and these produced a fuller sound than those of Professor Bell. — Engi- 
neering. 

Susceptible young gents are called " pilly " by the school girls. 



CALIFORNIA8 WINE INTERESTS. 
Beyond question tne of California in- 
dustry, and will s oaoturyheno loupyo bigot thoroof public attcn- 

m any other bronoh of basJnsss. The area of fumble lands i* 

quite M largo a* in Frame, tad the rliniatii- conditions are all that could 

i >l. Then ore hundreds of thousands of tores of mesa lands 
and mountain and foot hill ilopos whore the grapevine will flourish, ana 
from these will be selected the sites that are best adapted to the growth 
of the different tarii The vino, by proper cultivation, will 

flourish in tin* dryost OOUntiOS, with an occasional winter irrigation, which 

.Jin bo eoonrod olmaot anywhere nineteen years out of twenty. 

But this Industry must 1 f Blow growth, it is the least fitted for a 

ih.'m country, where immediate revenue is looked for, and enormous profits 
demanded. The history of vine growing in onr State for the last two 
decode! demonstrates this fact. The vineyards of the Old World are the 
result of generations of toil and experience, and it took centuries to es- 
tablish the fame of their wines. 

The pa-Ires, who introduced the grape on the Pacific coast, selected the 
hardiest OOmmOD variety 10 Spain as the one most suitable for their indo- 
lent and half civilized neophytes, and from this, now known as the Mis- 
sion grope, sprung all the early vineyards. For some years these vine- 
yards were very profitable, but as the number of acres increased, it was 
found impossible to find sale for the wines, and the work of replacing 
with the better varieties of grape has gone on vigorously for the past de- 
cade. As the market refused to absorb the poorer qualities of wine the 
vintners bestowed more attention upon the process of manufacture, anil 
thus the quality and value of the wines has improved steadily, and there 
is every assurance that in the future the demand will fully equal the pro- 
duction. 

The raisin grape has been extensively cultivated within the past 
three years, and already sufficient skill has been acquired in the handling 
of the California raisins to place them on the market in competition with 
the best foreign goods. The total area devoted to grapes in California is 
estimated at 85,000 acres, and the average wine product amounts to 10,- 
000,000 gallons, though the past year it was scarcely half that quantity. 
The shipments out of the State now average 2,000,000 gallons annually. 

The Committee on Wines and Liquors appointed by the Commissioners 
to the Paris Exposition, in their address to the viniculturists of Califor- 
nia, say: "The wine producers of this State are justly proud of the de- 
velopment which their industry has attained in the short period of twenty 
years. Under new conditions of climate, soil and culture, your struggles 
to produce and perfect an article of commerce, bo critically examined and 
used by so conservative a class of consumers as wine is, have been and 
now are attended with innumerable difficulties and failures. You could 
not avail yourselves of the experience of elder cultivators till you had 
learned from your own experience the influence of these new conditions. 
Your wooing of nature must be long and patient before the ' marriage of 
the grape and soil ' is happily effected. Before finding a profitable 
market for your wines you must overcome not only difficulties of pro- 
duction, but long-established prejudices of consumers and the ignorance 
of the taste and nature of true wine, which prevails so universally in our 
own country." 

Wholesale Grocers. 



REMOVAL. 

L. H. Newton.] NEWTON BROTHERS & CO., [Morris Newton. 

Importers and wholesale dealers lu Teas, Foreign Goods and 
Groceries, have removed to 204 and 200 California street, San Francisco, Cal- 
ifornia. June 7. 

Newton Boo^h, C. T. Wheeler, Sacramento. | J. T. Glover, W. W. Dodge, S. F 

W. W. DODGE & CO., 

Wholesale Grocers, corner Front and Clay streets, San 
Francisco. April 1. 

TABER, HAREER & CO., 

Successors to Phillips, Taber * Co., Importers and Wholesale Gro- 
cers, 108 and 110 California street, below Front, San Francisco. April 15. 

BRITISH BENEVOLENT SOCIETY OF CALIFORNIA. 

Attendance, daily, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., by the under- 
signed, to receive subscriptions and donations, and to furnish all information 
relating to the Society. J. P. McCURRIE, Secretary, 

Oct. 23. 730 Montgomery street. 

Wm. Irvine.] IRVINE & LE BRETON, [A. J. Le Brbton. 

Attorneys and Counselors at Law, No. 631 Sacramento 
street, Astor Block, San Francisco. ly 14- 

A. M. OILMAN, 

Importer and Wholesale Liquor Dealer, 308 California 
street, offers for sale Fine Old Bourbon and Rye Whiskies, Brandies, vintage of 
lS20and 1830, Old Port and Sherry Wines, Still and Sparkling Wines, etc. Agent for the 
Celebrated CACHET BLANC CHAMPAGNE. Sole Agent for MILLS' STOMACH 
BITTERS. March 4. 

}KW PRINTS -&4 
537 SACRAMENTO STREET, 
BELOW MONTGOMERY. 



JBRXJOE, 



H 



J. C. JOHNSON & CO, 
arness nud Saddlery of every description. 

street, San Francisco. 



12 and 14 Pine 

Dec. 15. 



L- G. PARTRIDGE, 

Attorney at Law, Xo. 6 Montgomery Avenue, corner Mont- 
gomery (third floor), Sau Francisco. Jan. 6. 

flhl £%£\{\ Salary. Permanent salesmen wanted to sell 

^9 J_,-^^ w\9 Staple- Goodato dealers. No-peddiing. Expenses paid. Addresa 
Sept. l.J S. A. GRANT J Sa CO. , 2, 4, 6 and S Home St. , Cincinnati, O. 

a Year. Ajsreuts wanted. Business legitimate. 

Particulars free. Address 

J. WORTH & CO. , St. Louis, Mo. 



$2500 

Sept. 1.] 



*L »> Sold Platpil Wnlrhps. Cbcnpest i 



Sept. 1.J 



Samitle Watch Free to Agents. Address 



the known world. 



A. COULTER & CO., Chicago. 



8 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Feb. 2, 1878. 



REORGANIZING THE POUCH. 

Senator McCoppin's bill reorganizes the police force, increases its 
numbers, and appears to afford reasonable guarantees, which do not now 
exist, that it will be non-partisan in its character. It is a good bill, and 
ought to pass. To say this is not to disparage the present force. Quite 
the contrary. We believe it is conceded on all hands that the present 
regular police officers have, during the recent trouble, displayed a degree of 
efficiency that does them credit. Considering their numbers, they have 
really done wonders in preserving the peace, in repressing crime, and in 
suppressing hoodlumism. That they have not accomplished all that is 
necessary to constitute this an adequately protected city, is true, but the 
fact is owing to the numerical weakness tf the force as a whole, and not 
to the weakness of its individual members. The time has fully arrived 
for the strengthening of the regular force. The specials ought long ago to 
have been numbered among the failures of the past. The system was bad 
in its inception, and infamous in its practical working. It was a legalized 
method for levying largess upon immorality and crime. It winked at 
wrong because it lived upon the evils it ought to have repressed. It has 
been a disgrace to the city that tolerated it. Itslonger continuance would 
be a crime, for which Legislators would be justly entitled to be indicted. 
As the system must now end, it follows that the regular force should be 
increased. Then, as to the amount of pay, we are glad that the original 
proposition of S80 per month has not been adhered to. It could hardly be 
said to be a sufficient remuneration for the really onerous duties imposed 
upon policemen. No doubt many would gladly accept the position at that 
price, but that is beside the question. All officers from that of the Presi- 
dent downwards could, at times, find persons ready and willing to occupy 
them at lower figures. But the interests of the public would not be pro- 
moted by putting up responsible positions to a kind of Dutch auction, at 
which the lowest bidder should be the winner. Above all things we don't 
want a cheap and nasty police force. "We therefore think that the pay- 
ment of §100 per month, upon which all parties appear to have compro- 
mised, is, in these times, fair towards the men, and just towards the tax- 
payers. The removal of the police from the arena of politics is what every 
thoughtful citizen will rejoice to see accomplished. It is a task whose 
difficulty has again and again puzzled Legislators. Senator McCoppin has 
made a fair attempt to conquer it. If non-partisan district judges, all of 
whom have been elected to office for considerations outside of party, are 
not capable of selecting a commission of five citizens who will give us a 
police force that is not a political machine, then indeed, would the task 
seem hopeless. We believe that the proposed method of selecting a com- 
mission will accomplish the end in view. It has been plausibly urged that 
certain of the present commissioners ought not to be removed, because 
they have been elected to other offices by the people. But it is for that 
very reason that most thoughtful men will desire their removal. Being 
Police Commissioners, and controling the machine, they procured their 
election to other offices. It is because good citizens want to see the 
office come to the man apart from such influences, that they demand a 
change. We believe that the demand will not be made in vain. The bill, 
as it finally passes into a law, will do so, we verily believe, in a shape to 
meet public expectations. If it does not, it will certainly not be the fault 
of the worthy senator who has introduced it. Th« course of every indi- 
vidual member of the San Francisco delegation is being closely watched. 
In regard to this question, there is, in the most influential quarters, a quiet 
but intense interest felt, that bodes no good to such of our representatives 
as may prove recreant to their trusts. The city wants an effective police 
force, and it knows it cannot have that if it is a political machine. 

PLACE HIM WHERE HELL DO THE MOST GOOD. 

In regard to Judge Ferral's merits as a judicial officer there may be, 
and there undoubtedly is, two opinions. We have ourselveB expressed 
one ere now. Recently he has, on more than one occasion, done himself 
credit. When he refused to allow himself to be overborne and brow- 
beaten by Judge Lake he did well. When he held firmly to the im- 
portant truth that mere spoken words, unaccompanied by a present intent 
and power to proceed to overt acts, did not constitute riotous proceedings, 
he showed that he, at least, had a cool head as to what constitutes the 
safeguards of liberty. As the temptations of the hour were strongly cal- 
culated to influence him the other way, he is entitled to all the more 
credit. Admitting so much in his favor, we yet hold to our original 
opinion. His is not a judicial mind, and nothing will ever make it one. 
If he had that gift to see himself as others see him, his candor would 
force the admission of what we claim. The last position his Maker ever 
intended him for was that of a Judge. His friends are evidently aware of 
that fact; so aware, indeed, are they, that they seem to be afraid that he 
may do them some harm. Hence we have seen it openly charged in the 
Legislature, that the reason for elevating certain misdemeanors into 
felonies, was that such cases might be placed in the safer hands of the 
Republican Judge Blake. Yet, in the face of that charge, a Democratic 
Legislature passed the bill. They were afraid that if let alone he would 
damage his party. It was the strongest possible evidence that those who 
knew him best most doubted his judicial competency. It meant that 
certainly, but did not mean anything more. It is not necessarily a dis- 
paragement of the Judge to say that he lacks the judicial faculty. If he 
were not a Judge it would be deemed rather a compliment. It is, per- 
haps, because of the absence of that faculty that he has been the useful 
party man, recognized and known of all good Democrats. He is a ready 
stump orator, an admirable controversialist — as witness his adroit reply 
to the Bulletin this week; and for wire pulling and pipe laying he has few 
superiors. You may make such a man a judge, but you cannot change 
his whole nature. Endeavor to repress Bob Ferral within the limits of 
judicial calmness, and he is like Samson shorn of his locks; the source of his 
real strength at once disappears. A Democratic Legislature might do a 
worse thing for the party than to find a more fitting place for Judge Fer- 
ral, in which hie undeniable abilities might be allowed to assert them- 
selves without danger._ We make that suggestion in the Judge's interest 
If it be adopted he will rejoice, and the people will be satisfied. More- 
over, there will be less uneasiness as to the manipulation of the police 
force, and greater respect for the soundness of judicial decisions. 

It is said that Don Carlos is at present on very bad terms with all the 
members of his family, in conseqence of the recent scandal of which he 
was the hero at Bucharest. He is practically separated from his wife, 
the Count de Chambord has declined to receive him, and several other 
princes have not condescended to return his visit. 



DOES ANYBODY KNOW? 



This "Capital and Labor" talk 
Will drive a chap insane; 

They argue one way, in a ring, 
Then argue back again ; 

The question may he badly mixed, 
Indeed, it must be so, 

But what does everybody want- 
Does anybody know ? 

The poor man blames the rich, but when The subtle brain outstrips the hand 



Bah ! "Down with Capital," indeed ! 

Such empty words are cheap ; 
The rule is, he shall get who can, 

Aud he who has shall keep. 
These ancient laws, as old as Time, 

We canvot overthrow, 
And if we could, what would result — 

Does anybody know? 



His own purse waxes fat, 
He sees no harm in Capital ; 

Now, what's the cause of that? 
'Tis certain that respect for wealth 

With gain of wealth docs grow, 
But how to change this hoary fact — 

Does anybody know 1 



In man's hot race for gold, 
Yet he who flies and he who creeps 

Should share alike, we're told ; 
The wise must " divvy " with the fools, 

The swift wait for the slow, 
How can we bring this all about — 

Does anybody know? 



Good gracious ! what can it avail 

To worry, snarl, aud tease? 
We know that those who have the cash 

Will use it as they please ; 
And so they have the right, in spite 

Of Kearney, Bones & Co., 
But if they hadn't, well— what then — 

Does anybody know? 

A GROWL FROM THE EDITOR. 
All positions in life are said to be attended with features more or less 
disagreeable. The editor's chair is probably the most uneasy seat that 
was ever manufactured for the use of mortal man. But, of all the trials 
with which he is afflicted, perhaps the greatest is that, whilst he is him- 
self inclined naturally by his education and instincts to tread an elevated 
plane of conduct, and strives to preserve a clear judgment as to what is 
right, true and noble in the world, he is brought into contact with more 
of its shams than any other man. To him come, day after day, all the 
weaknesses of the world, all the vanities that want to get puffed, all the 
revenges that want to be wreaked, all the mistakes that want to be cor- 
rected, all the dull speakers who want to be thought eloquent, all the 
brokers who buy for their customers at the highest price of the day, and 
sell at the lowest, and yet want to be written of as honest men ; all the 
adulterators of food, who yet talk to him as if there were no such com- 
mand as " Thou shalt commit no adulteration ;" all the truckling legis- 
lators who are daily breaking their pledges and proving themselves recre- 
ant to the sacred trust reposed in them, and yet have the effrontery to 
seek editorial salve for their violated consciences ; all the death-dealing 
quacks, who think that every editor is eiher a Pickering or a Fitch ; all the 
wealthy rascals who " starve out" wives, abandon children, and revel in 
lust, and want him to still the voice of indignant and outraged society, 
when they themselves supplied it with its tongue ; all those parsons who 
in their pulpits speak of him as a graceless sinner, almost beyond redemp- 
tion, yet they want a favorable notice of their latest, and perhaps their 
dullest sermon ; all the bilks who hang on by their eyebrows to the outer 
edge of journalism, and are everlastingly in want of "four bits ;" all the 
played-out actors, who, having failed everywhere else, are intent upon 
fooling him, in order that he may fool his readers, into the belief that 
crowned heads have done them homage, whilst the populace idolized 
them ; all the meanness that wants to get its wares noticed gratis in the 
editorial column, in order to save the tax in the advertising columns ; all 
the men who want to be set right, who were never right ; all the crack- 
brained philosophers with stories as long as their hair, and as gloomy as 
their finger-nails in mourning because bereft of soap ; all the bores who 
come to stay five minutes, but attempt to talk five hours, without having 
anything to say. By the Editor is seen, day after day, all the follies and 
shams of the world, until the wonder is, not that he believes in so few 
things, but that he has any faith left for God, man or woman. 

ASKING ENGLAND TO HELP ITS. 
Verily the politicians are making a wonderful bugbear of the ever- 
lasting Chinese question. Away down in Australia the other day they 
settled it right off. Perhaps it is this success which has induced a Con- 
gressional Committee to propose that Eugland should be asked to help us 
out of our little difficulty. The House Committee on Education and 
Labor, after a free interchange of views on the general subject, unani- 
mously agreed that it was advisable and desirable that Chinese immigra- 
tion to this country should be checked, or limited in some way. Having 
made this much progress toward a settlement of the question, the com- 
mittee thereupon adopted a suggestion of Chairman Goode, and directed 
Messrs. Willis, of Kentucky, and Loring, of Massachusetts, to draft a 
resolution for consideration by the fidl committee at their next meeting, 
which shall, in suitable terms, instruct the President to invite the co- 
operation of the governments of China and Great Britain to pre* ent the 
importation of coolie labor, and generally to restrict Chinese immigration 
to the United States. Would not. it be as well to avoid asking others to 
do for us what we are abundantly well able to do for ourselves, if only we 
believe it is worth doing at all ? 

MILLIONS IN IT 
The blessed rain has come, and there are in very truth millions in 
it. If every shower had poured down twenty-dollar pieces, until sacks 
could have been filled with them, by the use of a shovel, we question if 
the result would equal the wealth which will now be made to teem from 
the earth. A bountiful harvest is now assured, and that means a great 
deal. It means the widest and best possible distribution of wealth ; it 
means work enough for all to do ; it means money in every honest man's 
pocket ; it means an early ending of the depression that has too long hung 
like a pall over the State ; it means an ending to agitation and threats to 
riot ; it means happy homes, smiling faces, and contentment all round ; 
it means that the News Letter will soon be able to collect its little bills 
with its accustomed promptitude ; and, the writer trusts, it means an in- 
creased salary to him who earns it. Amen. 



The efforts of Mr. David Bush to raise a fund for the employment of 
destitute workingmen is highly commendable. Already a number of our 
promising firms and citizens have subscribed fifty dollars each, and we 
hope that a short time only will elapse before the whole amount sought 
for, viz : five thousand dollars, will be realized. Although the sum is not 
large, it will do much to relieve present distress, and do away with some 
of the suffering and privation that now prevail in our midst. 



Vch. 2, 1878. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



THE TOWN CRIER. 

"lW*r UH M lb* d#Ttl »rt ihonr* 

■ On* thai will [>;*) th« J*»il. »tr. with no." 



" IlVd • ctirtc in hi» uil »« l.me u « flail. 
Which madr him jtruw bottler and bolder." 



The little oom are waiting with impnided breath to know whether 

-e labyrinthine paragraphs of gufleteaa interrogation 

wjJ flat b- *.*■•! attinnntion from Bancroft or McGuffey. It is a more 

serious matter than people teem to realise; for, while in the one a round, 

frank, open-ti for cow, in the other it stands for cat, and bo 

i. It would bo awkward if a little miss, wanting to show 

Iiap* how »he had unproved daring the term, should pick an the wrong 
100k, rend Eroni the ntcturcs after the simple manner of childhood, and 
Oh, no! it is a canary. Does for grow on canarieel 
Oh, no The American Constitution can never 

loatained until the children have some acknowledged autho- 
rity for what standi Ear. T. t\ suggests the discarding of both series, 
fur wskIc McGuffey in apt to say: " A wild idea exists a m ong some pet p!e 
that the time will come when we shall travel by steam on roads of iron 
and shall transmit messages by Ughtmng," Bancroft U apt to make a 
jump like an ambitions bronko on grabbed desert lands, and say: " There 
pie in San Francisco moved about in cars, coaches 
and coupes. It now seems strange to think that we were ever without 
avit >r>." Perhaps it would be wiser to keep the children at some set of* 
books more closely connected with the present epoch. 

Th^ evil that men do lives after them. The good often goes to 
State Prison with them. The attention of parties intending to make a 
IHTtnaiient investment and content to patiently wait for the returns is 
called to Newt Morgan's new style of endowment policy. It offers in- 
ducements vastly superior to those of the old style. There is no scramb- 
ling to make quarterly or half-yearly payments, no labor, no anxiety. It 
sry to quietly steal the amount of money required, tie it up 
carefully, and, comfortably and luxuriously, lay off in the Penitentiary 
until the necessary time has expired and the policy is due. It is wise to 
make as big a haul as possible. This precaution is unnecessary, but we 
volunteer it unhesitatingly. It may be urged that this manner of pro- 
ceeding involves a certain los3 of caste. So does poverty. 

CoL Bee reports an active demand in Arkansas for Coolies, while the 
gentle Missourian also languishes pensively for the patient, plodding, 
moon-eyed, lousy celestial. Missouri shall not languish long, nor Arkan- 
sas pine. It is more blessed to give than to receive, and we had rather 
give a Chinaman any day, than receive a full-fledged Missourian or an Ar- 
kansas traveler. But, why in Heaven's name, doesn't some one give old 
Bee a job? The amount of exertion that amiable fossil devotes to spend- 
in- useless time might, with some benefit to the race, be devoted to some 
mure useful occupation than living. Would it be possible by some wild 
flight of invention and the affixing, perhaps, of a queue, to play the child- 
like Bee ou Missouri or Arkansas, for a Chinaman 1 Alas, no ! He lacks 
the first characteristic of the race. 

A covey of females have banded together under the name of "The 
Women's Christian Association." The main object is to cany Bible 
truths. In order to be perfectly unimpeded in the good work, it will also 
be necessary to carry a latch-key. Now, therefore, shall the unhappy 
husband gaze at the retreating form of his wife and wonder whither she 
goeth, and shall know nothing of the same, any more than she knows it 
about him. And he shall arise and say unto himself, What privilege is 
there in being a man when the latch-key has become common property ? 
And he shall weep and a terrible disgust will fall on him. And he will 
be calmed by his wife, who will come home and say, " The Women's 
Christian Association has busted. There was no capital stock. 

McCoppin's Boulevard bill has already been productive of some 
good. Its author has been permitted to come out in a card. A periodical 
card affords as much relief to the white-haired Apollo a3 a contemplation 
in the mirror of the faultless physique. Also the AUa has been permitted 
to make a little fight on the part of the Protestant Orphan Asylum. 
Both are doing as well as can be expected, but the AUa is perhaps the 
most comfortable. It is easier to sling a card into a newspaper at any 
time than an Orphan Asylum. This is a good time to correct the impres- 
sion that the AUa runs the Protestant Orphan Asylum. Not so. By a 
pleasant and natural reversal, the Protestant Orphan Asylum runs 
the AUa. 

Mr. Drucker wants to find the man who sent him cyanide of potas- 
sium. What does he want with the man? The man hasn't got any more 
cyanide of potassium, and if he had he Would not give it to Mr. Drucker. 
The Supervisor very sensibly observes that he does not like cyanide of 
potassium, while the man with the potassium does not like Supervisors. 
Upon the whole, perhaps, they had better not meet. There would cer- 
tainly be an unpleasant feeling of some kind, a restraint so to speak. 
There is something peculiarly painful in the reflection that a whole bottle 
of good gin has been wasted in this sad affair. Good gin is scarce. The 
potassium man would have been wiser to use bad brandy. 

The bringing up of Swift's water bill in Sacramento, the other day, 
called forth an extraordinary demonstration. The Assembly made a 
showing of hands. The Assemblyman hides his hand, as a matter of 
custom, as scrupulously as a whist player. As this was the first season in 
Sacramento of the greater number of them, the effect was not so bad as 
it might have been later in the session. But horror-stricken eyewitnesses 
have been heard to attest that this same showing of hands was the most 
powerful and irrefutable argument that has yet been advanced for the 
enlargement of the water supply. 

Mr. Haigbt, of tbe Board of Supervisors, thinks it easier to corrupt a 
large body than a small one. Right-minded people should immediately 
defer to the experience which draws forth such a conclusion. It is only 
necessary to say that Mr. Haight is an ex-School Director. If it be pos- 
sible to belong to anything smaller than a Board of Education a munifi- 
cent power has confined such knowledge to the frequenters of ward pri- 
maries, church vestries and other interesting star-chamber business. 
After all, the size of the body does not matter so much as the amount of 
corrupter in the pile. 



Mr. Oscar Lewis, the |>npular saloon keeper, i* an outraged and put 
upon m name ia everywhere 

revered as it. 

morning last week that during tha previous night a small b< 
bored near the fastening of the shutter of the window in his back roi 
evidently the work of burglars. Mr. Lewis very naturally reasoned that 
the thieves would return the following night to carry out their d. 

and he decided t<> 1h> fully prepared for them. So, in the fullness of his 

heart, he confided to his customi n the details "f what he called Ids 'Vur- 
tkled with satisfaction over his cocktails at his antici- 
pated sport. That evening, at VI o'clock, when the laloon WAS closed, 
■; out Ida douUe-barreldd gun, and stationed himself in a com- 
fortable arm-chair in front of the window in question. He was flanked on 
one side by B liberal supply of hot -sctch, and on the other he was rein- 
forced by a bulldog of the moat vigorous description. The hours wore 
wearily away, but still the rogues did not call for the double dose of quail 
shot that so patiently awaited them. Day at last dawned, and the disap- 
pointed < 'scar rubbed his sleepy eyes, and concluded to retire from picket 
duty until the next night. As he passed into the front saloon he noticed 
something strange about the place. Further investigation proved that while 
he had been decoyed into acting as sentinel at the rear of the premises, 
the intelligent burglars hud quietly entered at the front, rifled the till, 
and carried off about a hundred bottles of expensive liquors. " It was a 
put up job," moaned Lewis, and now any one who wishes to be brained 
with a decanter, has only to drop into the saloon and sympathyzingly re- 
mark: " How about those burglars you nabbed the other evening, 
Oscar r 

That we are all descended from monkeys, Darwin assures us ; and 
that that animal should be the symbol of human duplicity, is not inap- 
propriate. On the Southern Pacific road, just this side of Menlo Park, 
and within a few yards of the track, is the humble cottage and grounds of 
one of the locomotive engineers. In this yard is a pet monkey, which is 
trained to sit on the fence, as the cars go by, and salute its master. The 
latter, however, invariably throws a large lump of coal at the monkey, 
and the passengers derive much amusement from watching the nimbleness 
with which it dodges these missiles. In fact, the engineer frequently 
"fires" several lumps at Jocko, but somehow without ever hitting or dis- 
couraging that indefatigable beast. Even the Superintendent of the line 
wondered somewhat at this circumstance, although he always enjoyed 
the proceedings as much as the other travelers. This has continued two 
or three times a day for over a year. The other day the fnel supplies at 
Menlo gave out, and in the emergency the engineer's son was found to 
have some tons of spare coal on hand which he was willing to dispose 
of at fifteen dollars a ton, as a special favor. The dim and distant odor of 
a rodent has penetrated the olfactories of the Superintendent, and now 
both the engineer and bis monkey have ceased to officiate. The moral of 
this story is, that there is a monkey of some kind in the front yard of 
nearly every officer of these "bloated monopolies." That is some satis- 
faction, however, to the public. 

Two sweet Bells, jangled out of tune, carried their domestic tintin- 
nabulations into the divorce court last week, and will doubtless soon have 
their wedding chimes repealed by the over-worked Dwindle. All this 
was very Californian and proper, but we desire to put in a word of sym- 
pathy for one of the witnesses, a Mr. Jones, who after testifying em- 
phatically to the fact that he did not request Mrs. Bell to sit on his knee 
in a dark room, was further badgered as to the utterly irrelevent circum- 
stance of his having served a term in the penitentiary in early life. It is 
such impertinent and gratuitous meddling with the careers of our best 
and oldest citizens that is bringing the law into disrepute in this commu- 
nity. What is the use of carefully and uprightly swindling our fellow 
townsmen out of large fortunes if the respectability and high-tone there- 
by acquired is to be jeopardized by every gimlet-nosed lawyer in the 
courts ? What is the use, under the circumstances, of being " a wealthy 
and big-hearted Californian " if every little burglary or homicide of one's 
thoughtless youth is liable to be raked up out of the forgotten past and 
fired at one in some petty divorce or re-hypothecated stock case ? It ac- 
tually takes all the pleasure out of collecting one's rents, putting up a 
deal in Ophir, or even being a Pioneer. 

Dr. Moffat, an English missionary just returned from Africa, has been 
presented with the freedom of the London Guild of Turners and a gold 
medal. The good man was so much effected that he promised on the spot to 
return to the scene of his labors with ten Divinity students, and put in 
another twenty years wrestling with the heathen. The Doctor has grown 
quite fat during his vacation, and the students are all young and in ex- 
cellent condition. The good news will carry a thrill of joy to many a 
starving soul among the poor benighted and ill-provided for negroes. 

Some model statesman at Sacramento has just moved that "moose" 
be added to the list of law-protected game in this State. Unless this gen- 
tleman is acting in the interest of that bloated monopoly, Woodward's 
Gardens, we suggest that elephants and Bengal tigers be also added to 
the schedule. We have a "rich uncle in India," according to our family 
fortune teller, and there is no knowing what little mementoes he may 
send over at any time, 

A gentleman in Oakland last week started to accomplish the often 
attempted feat of eating forty quail in as many dajra. The experiment 
failed in consequence of the singular behavior of a restaurant keeper, who 
refused to furnish the quail for nothing. Thus it is that the progress of 
scientific inquiry is continually defeated and retarded by the narrow 
prejudices of the ignorant and debased. 

Col. Sam. Beaver, of the Bank Rifle Team, exhibits in Maj. D. W. 
Laird's window a half-dollar with a leaden bullet shot into it by him. 
Considering the Colonel's greenback connection, we should think he would 
have given the currency a show, even if he had to send it up in a 
parachute. 

The man who invented cathartic pills has just been killed in India; 
and yet some people persist in doubting a retributive Providence. Now 
let the demon who foisted dried-apple pies upon a suffering world, be hur- 
ried unshriven into eternity, and Bob Ingersoil won't have a leg left to 
stand upon. 

Mr. Kearney is rather curtly described by a bloated capitalist as "a 
person who stands on one end while he creates a disturbance with the 
other." An early case of arson in aforesaid Plutocrats neighborhood may 
be expected. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Feb. 2, 1878. 



RUTH. 

Lon£ noons and long, still afternoons, 
Shut in by old gray wooden walls ; 
Sweet voices singing old, sweet tunes — 
Sweet echo, echoing in the halls ; 
A stretch of lawn from porch to gate, 
And one tall aspen quivering nigh, 
And one stray cuckoo, wandering late 
Under a calm, pale purple sky. 

A wood-bound line of water, clear, 

In glancing lapses pierced the trees, — 

Its brightness part of all the cheer 

Of keen, sweet sounds, a whorl of bees ; 

Hoses and rose-buds caught the sun. 

We smelled the spice-pinks ; here and there 

Great lilies nodded, one and one, 

Like ladies loitering in the air. 

And when the thunder-rattle rang 

In angry clouds, from out the eves 

The shy house pigeon's broodhng sprang, 

And sheltered in the barley sheaves. 

Oh me! what seal is on that land, 

What sign is set upon that door, 

Which opened like a ready hand, — 

That I Bhall know it yet once more? 

When, wandered home through home-sick 

years, 
Like Ruth I wait, in widowed woe ; 
What voice will answer to my tears 
To bid me stay or bid me go ? 
Know'st thou? know'st thou? speak, Silent 

One! 
That keep'st the key of mystic lore; 
Where is that land, east of the sun 
And west of age frost-smitten shore? 

— Millie W. Carpenter. 



THE CHINESE LOAN. 
"When this loan was issued, the other day, I 
advised investment in it, whilst newspapers jeer- 
ed at the very idea. The applications were con- 
siderably more than double the amount of the 
loan. Why it should have been assumed, that 
China would not pay a &mall debt, which she was 
incurring, or that she had no right to borrow 
what she could easily repay, was indeed strange. 
The Chinese have many vices, and some few vir- 
tues. Amongst the latter, prominently figures 
the payment of all debts incurred. It may, per- 
haps, surprise some persons to learn, that Chi- 
nese commercial morality is as far superior to 
English commercial morality, as Chinese social 
morality is below it. English merchants in China 
hardly ever lose by Chinese bad debts. A Chi- 
naman cannot, like an Englishman, go through 
aome whitewashing process, and, having paid his 
creditors one penny in the pound, immerge a 
free and respected man. He must pay what he 
owes, or be forever dishonored. It may suit 
Manchester commission agents to endeavor to 
cheat the Chinese, by means of secret commis- 
sions, and adulterated goods, and then to com- 
plain of the Chinese cheating them. This is all 
nonsense; the cheating is entirely on our side. If 
a Mandarin were established in the Mansion 
House, and were to apply a bamboo to the soles 
of a few of our respected financiers once a week, 
it is possible, that after a few years, we might 
attain to the standard of Chinese commercial mo- 
rality. As it is, we fall far short of it.— Mam- 
mon, in Truth. 

THIERS AS A DEBATER. 
M. Thiers, it is well known, always took great 
pains with his speeches, which were studied even 
to the last refinement of phrase and verbal color 
ing. They were long prepared ; and after they 
were delivered he used to spend entire nights in 
the office of the Moniteur correcting and amend- 
ing them for official publication. Yet in extem- 
pore debate he had no superior, perhaps no equal, 
until Grambetta arose. A sudden discussion al- 
ways found him ready with his facts and figures, 
his ever available power of irony, his inveterate 
pugnacity. Nor did extempore debate ever be- 
tray him into flying over, or descending below, 
his subject. Sometimes he was impetuously in- 
dignant, and exceedingly bitter in his reports; 
but he rarely made use of his temper to lend the 
impressiveness of wrath to his eloquence. He 
was most dexterous in speeeh; there was tact and 
finesse in the wit that once in a while sparkled 
forth, and he was almost finically precise in the 
accuracy of his figures and statement of facts ; 
but was not master of the art, in which Glad- 
stone is facile princeps among recent statesmen 
of making figures eloquent. — Scribner. 

Paper is better than straw to lay beneath car- 
pets. Two layers between the sheets are equal in 
warmth to a quilt. Whole familes have depend- 
ed on newspapers tacked together for their bed- 
ding, and have been enabled to at least escape 
severe suffering. 



HERE AND THERE. 

Oh, Heaven is nearer than mortals think, 

When they look with a trembling dread 
At the misty future that stretches on 

From the silent home of the dead. 
The eye that shuts in a dying hour 

Will open the next in bliss ; 
The welcome will sound in the heavenly world 

Ere the farewell is hushed in this. 



The California Fish Commission state in 
their report that a quarter of a million Sacra- 
ramento salmon were placed in theTruckee river 
about two years ago, and next Summer probably 
will be found in Pyramid Lake, where there is an 
abundance of food. Since its organization the 
Commission has placed in the streams of this 
State 8,350,000 young salmon. From six million 
to ten million eggs are annually hatched on the 
McCloud river, at the U. States fish hatchery. 

The Spanish Government has broken off all 
relations with Queen Isabella. One thing about 
this fat and peculiar woman is her misfortunes. 
Misfortune gives dignity to the most insignificant 
of mankind, and almost disarms censure. Isabella 
on the throne, was the subject of constant and 
merciless criticism ; Isabelladethroned and exiled, 
is simply a woman in trouble, sure of the pity of 
all manly men. 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD. 

NORTHEBN DIVISION. 

WINTER ARRANGEMENT. 

C^ommeiBCiug- Monday, Oct. 22,1. 1877, 
J Passenger Trains will leave San Francisco from Pas- 
senger Depot on Townsend street, betweeu Third and 
Fourth streets, as follows : 



8 0A a.m (daily) for Sau Jose, Gilroy, Hollister, Tres 
,tJ\J pinos, Pajaro, Salinas. Soledad and all Way 
Stations, making Stage connections at San Mateo for 
Half Moon Bay and Pescadero ; at Redwood for Wood- 
side, Searsville and Pescadero ; at San Jose for Los 
Gatos and Lexington ; at Gilroy for Los Banos and Fire- 
baugh's ; at Sargent's for San Juan and Natividad ; at 
Soledad for Paraiso Springs, Paso Robles Hot Springs, 
San Luis Obispo, Guadalupe, Santa Barbara, San Buen- 
aventura and Los Angeles. 

B^"At Pajaro connects with the Santa Cruz Rail- 
road for Aptos and Santa Cruz. 



nO!X a m. (daily) forMenlo Park and Way Sta- 
.^JtJ tions. 



3 Of: P.M. daily (Sundays excepted) for San Jose, 
,4i*J Gilrovand Wav Stations. 



Gilroy and Way Stations. 



A 4-0 P " M " ( dai1 ^ for San Jose and Wav Stations. 
U O A p.m. (daily) for Menlo Park and Way Stations. 



%£T* Extra train on Sundays discontinued. 

A. C. BASSETT, Superintendent. 
H. R. JUDAH, Assistant Passenger and Ticket Agent. 



SOUTHERN DIVISIONS. 

85^*" Passengers for points on the Southern Divisions 
of the road will take the cars of the Central Pacific Rail- 
road via OAKLAND, leaving SAN FRANCISCO via Ferry 
Landing-, Market street, at 4:00 p.m. daily, and making 
close connection at GOSHEN for Sumner, Mojave, Los 
Angeles, Wilmington, Anaheim, Colton & Colorado River. 



C. P. R. R. 



Commencing Wednesday, Jan. 9, 1878. and until 

further notice, Trains and Boatswill Leave S. F: 

Overland Ticket Office, at Ferry Landing, Market street. 



7 00 Al M- ( dailv >- Vallejo Steamer (from Market 
I »\j\j street Landing — Connecting with Trains for 
Napa (Stages for Sonoma), Calistoga (the Geysers), 
Woodland, Williams, Knight's Landing and Sacramento. 
(Sundays excepted) for Woodland, Williams and 
Knight's Landing. (Arrive San Francisco 8:10 p.m.) 



Q. Af) A.M. (daily), Atlantic Express Train (via Oak- 
^j,\j\j ] an( i pen-y) f or Sacramento, Marysville, Red- 
ding, Portland (Or.), Colfax, Reno (Virginia City), Pali- 
sade (Eureka), Ogden and Omaha. Connects at Gait 
with train arriving at lone at3:40r.M. 

(Arrive San Francisco 5:35 p.m.) 



O QH A.M. (Sundays excepted) Northern Railway Lo- 
v.*/v/ cal Passenger Train to San Pablo and Martinez. 
(Arrive San Francisco 3:35 r.M.) 



Q OO P-M * C dail y)San Jose Passenger Train (via Oak- 
*J t \J\J i ail0 ! Ferry), stopping at all Way Stations. Ar- 
rives at Sau Jose at 5:30 p.m. 
(Arrive San Francisco 9:35 a.m.) 



Q Qjj P-M. (daily) Northern Railway Local Passenger 
%j. u\j q^ain to San Pablo and Martinez. 

(Arrive San Francisco 9:35 A.M.) 



4C\C\ P.M. (daily) Express Train (via Oakland Ferry), 
.\J\J for Lathrop, Stockton, Merced, Visalia, Sum- 
uer, Mojave, Newhall, San Buenaventura, Santa Barbara- 
Los Angeles, "S-inta Monica," Wilmington, Santa Ana, 
San Diego, Colton and Yuma (Arizona Stages and Colo, 



rado River Steamers). Connects at Niles with train ar- 
riving at San Jose at 6:55 p.m. " Sleeping Cars " between 
Oakland, Los Angeles and Yuma. 
(Arrive San Francisco 12 :40 p.m.) 

4- OO P " M. (Sundays excepted) Vallejo Steamer (from 
■*»vv/ Market Street Landing), connecting with trains 
for Calistoga, (the Geysers), Woodland, Knight's Land- 
ing and Sacramento; and at Sacramento with Passen- 
ger Train, leaving at 9:15 p.m. on Tuesdays, Thursdays 
and Saturdays only, for Truckee, Reno, Carson and 
Virginia City. "Sleeping Cars" between Vallejo and 
Carson. (Arrive San Francisco 11:10 a.m.) 



4 Of\ PM - (Sundays excepted) Sacramento Steamer 
■ W (from Wash'n St. Wharf), for Beniciaand Land- 
ings on the Sacramento River; also, taking the third class 
overland passengers to connect with train leaving Sacra- 
mento at 9:00 a.m., daily. (Arrive San Francisco 8:00 p.m. 



4 A P.M. (daily), Through Third Class and Accom- 
• OLT modation Train, via Lathrop and Mohave, 
arriving at Los Angeles on second day at 11:55 A.M. 
(Arrive San Francisco 7:30 A.M. 



FERRIES AND LOCAL TRAINS. 



From "SAiy FKA1VCISCO," Paily. 



A 7.00 

7.30 

8.00 

8.30 

9.00 

9.30 

10.00 

10.30 

11.00 

11.30 

12.00 

P12.30 

1.00 

1.30 

2.00 



A 6.10 
Pll.45 









v.? 



A 8.00 
t9.30 

p 3.00 
4.00 
t8.10 



A 7.30 A 8.00 

8.30 t9.30 

9.30lptl.00 

10.301 3.00 

11.30 4.00 

P12.30 1 tS.10 

l.OOl 

3.30 

4.301 

6.301 

6.30 s 

7.00 

8.10lfChange Cars 

9.201 at 

10.30 East Oakland 



. ,p*7.00 a «.10 ) daily, I 

*8.10 Pll.45 \ SUNDAYS J 
1 *11.45 ) EXCEPTED 



A 7.30 
8.30 
9.30 
10.30 
11.30 
P 1.00 
4.00 
5.00 
6.00 



13 

MB 

SSL 



a 8.00 
10.00 

P 3-.00 
4.30 
5.3C 



Change Cars 

at 
West O'kland 



A 6.10 
p 6.00 



*10.30 p.m. Sundays only to Alameda. 
To FERNSIDE— except Sundays — 7.00, 9.00, 10.00 
A.M., and 5 p.m. 
To SAN JOSE— Daily— 19:30 A.M., 3:00, 4:00 P.M. 



To " SAW FBAST CISCO," Dally. 


a 


a 

H 


> 

SI 

o 

> 


5* 


00 ^ 

9S •< 


O 

p 


FROM 

OAKLAND. 
(Broadway.) 


A 8.00 
10.00 

p 3.00 
4.30 
5.30 


A 7.30 
8.30 
9.30 
10.30 
11.30 
p 1.00 
4.00 
5.00 


A"6.25 
7.00 
8.03 
9.00 
10.03 
11.03 
12,00 
p 1.00 
3.00 
'3.20 
4.00 
6.00 
6.03 
•10.00 


Ate. 45 

7.55 

11.15 

tll.45 

p 3.40 


At7.08 
8.15 
11.35 
Ptl203 
4.03 
t4.45 


A 0.40 
7.40 
8.40 
9.40 
10.40 
11.40 


A 6.50 
7.20 
7.50 
8.25 
8.50 
9.20 


p 2.50 
3.20 
3.50 
4.20 
4.50 
5.20 
5.50 








6.25 


I 6.00 






2.40 
4.40 
5.40 
6.40 
7.50 
9.00 
10.10 


10.50 
11.20 
11.50 
P12.20 
12 50 
1.20 
1.50 


6.50 




8.00 
9.10 
10.20 


^ 


.. 


Change Cars 

at 
West Oaklnd. 


tChange Cars 

at 
East Oakland 


A 6.30 


A 5.40 


A-5.00 
*5.40 

p*7.20 
'8.30 


1 /'a 5.1o!a 5.20 


















) EXCE 


PTED V 


1 





From FERNSIDE— except Sundays— 8.00, 10.00, 11.00 

A.M., and 6.00 P.M. 

FROM SAN JOSE— Daily— 7:05 and 8:10 A.M. 

♦Alameda Passengers change cars at Oakland. 

a— Morning, p — Afternoon. 



Tno Creeh Ferry Boat will Bun Dally: 

From SAN FRANCISCO, at 7:15 and 9:45 A.M , 12:15, 
2:25, and 4:10 P.M. 

From OAKLAND, at 8:15, and 10:45 A.M., 1:15, 3:15 
and 5:00 P.M. 



"Official Sebelule Time" furnished by Anderson & 
Randolph, Jewelers, 101 and 103 Montgomery St., S. F. 
T. H. GOODMAN, Gen. Pass, and Ticket Agt. 
A. N. Towxe, General Superintendent. 



CPN&RD LINE. 

British and Worth American Boyal 
Mail Steamships between NEW YORK and LIV- 
ERPOOL, calling at QUEENSTOWN. 
Sailing from New York every Wednesday 

ABYSSINIA Jan. 2d, Feb. 6th 

SCYTHIA Jan. 23d, Feb. 27th 

PARTHIA Jan. 9th, Feb. 13th 

ALGERIA 

BOTHNIA 

CHINA Jan. 16th, Feb 20th 

BATAVIA January 30th 

Passage can be secured and all information given on 
application to 

WILLIAMS, BLANCHARD & CO., 
Jan. 5. 218 California St. 



-'. 1878. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



11 



ii 



>.■;- 



Co. 
Iir- 



Co; 
'reu 



Notabilia. 



In Dakota, the attar <Uy, * stage load of paswngers were cN»ni|^Hni 
i their hand* aboi -i* while a nog of highwaymen 

-. who remark' 
•voa alluwed t.» keep bia watch as a reward ra In* Im- 
mar. Well, humor always is rewarded, if rigfatij employed. That i.-* 
r NftAhUia man is the bm peid advertiser in the city. 'I hat s 
why l'avi.i Bun, of S7and 19 New Montgomery street, opjk 
I'aiaiv, has eogaged him to laugh i-cople OUtoi UM fouj ol oring the 
Seta gn* I'uruvra. The new patented salt told by Buab reduces gas 
blUa SO i«er cent sure. 

" Say, Crawford, what'a the matter these times? Don't hold yur 
head op like yon used to do." " Hold me head up, indeed," exclaimed 
the fauhtul a lured man; "how's a nigger t" do dat, when maaV faafl 
turned moral kHot, and bust Dp, and tint old Frenchman got the btirfnees, 
and the old ibap. He wanted me, too, and I had togo, but it took de 
starch all away. 1 h oot prond any more." Preaently, 1 passed that 
master, a lone straggler by himself, in whom the busy throng had do in- 
terest dow. A moral leprosy seemed t<» have struck him. Tears came 
to my eyes, for I bad loved him once. There was only one thing left me 
end that was to get revived by Golden Plantation Whisky, at 
V. a\P. J. Caaam'a, Front street. 



Connecticut tramps, on receiving bread and butter, stick it to the 
window-panes of their l-tnef actors. The}' want pie. 

Have yon met that i ale. emaciated creature, who, with downcast 
eye, i\\ i B fate she would fain shun '! Have you not noticed 

that nervous, distrustful look, as she walks with slow and unsteady steps? 
'1 be color has left her cheeks, the cherry red has vanished from her lips, 
and even her eyes seem dull and expressionless. What has wrought this 
wondrous change? Great heavens! has some lurking disease claimed her 
as its own ? May be no, and may be yes ; anyhow, what ails her is, 
that she has been caught in the rain, and it always makes that kind of a 
muss with her colors. We can warm her, and dry her clothes, but that's 
all we can do tor such as her, even by the virtues of De La Montanya's 
■ Range 

When Senator Davis, of Illinois, wakes up in the morning, he calls 
out to his private secretary: "John, on which side did I vote yesterday?" 
" Democratic,'" says John. "Ah, then this is the Republican's day. John, 
put a cannon-ball in each coat-tail pocket." Why does he thus change 
from day to day ? Because he 6nds neither side altogether good. Our 
Notabilia man knows a good thing when he finds it, and sticks to it with- 
out changing. He knows a good, clean, and comfortable restaurant. 
That's why he sticks to Swain's, 213 Sutter street. No place in the city 
hike it. He meets the best families there. 



Since the widow Oliver affair, Don Cameron calls his father, *' My 
Awful Dad." 

"One, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight," said our Notabilia 
man, as he counted the sitters around the stove in the bar-room. "That'll 
cost just about a dollar." Every eye glistened, and every mouth watered. 
" Give me a glass of ale, George." Then eight faces got so long that they 
struck the cellar floor with a thud, and the last seen of our Notabilia 
man's coat-tail was when the door bit it off. Our Notabilia man enjoyed 
that glass of ale, and liked his joke, and, to complete his happiness, he 
lunched at Emerson Corville's, 413 Pine street, where he always goes 
when he has an appetite for the lltd Cross Brand of Canned Salmon. 



' ' Den you'se on de side ob de fiah an' brimstone in dis hell discuss- 
ion?" "You'se right, honey! Ef ynu tink you'se gwiue to leebe dis 
wurld ter play snow-ball somewhar, you'se Vong. Dar's er warm place 
jess beyant heah, and heah, too, fer de wife forsakers an' ehilder starvers 
ginrully, else I'se gwine to swap my himbook fer erpack er kyards." The 
darkey was right, just as is our Notabilia man when he prefers to avoid 
headaches, preserve a healthy stomach, and keep sober, by drinking 
Gerke Wine, which he buys of Landsberger, 10 and 12 Jones Alley. 



1 ' Cousin Fred, you're not at all nice, now you are married. Why, 
you haven't paid me a compliment for ages. Have you forgotten how to 
compliment?" " My dear Clara, I've been married two years, and of 
course I'm awfully out of practice." But by way of making amends for 
all his forgetfulness, by one supreme compliment, he said: " Clara, you 
look so charming to-day, that you must have your photo taken. Bradley 
& Rulofson alone can do justice to you. Let's go." They went. 



' ' Temple Bar torn down ! ' 

at work in England." 



said he: "so the crusade women are 



Chief Joseph asks, "When will these white chiefs tell the truth?" 
And echo answers when there is nothing to be gained by cheating the In- 
dians. Our Notabilia man wants to know when Spring Valley will leave 
off supplying impure water? Never. Then, never will Bush & Milne 
leave off supplying Carbon Silica ted Filters to purify it with. New Mont- 
gomery street, under the Grand. 

"An enthusiast," says Billings, "is an individual who believes about 
four times as much as he can prove, and who can prove four times as 
much as anybody else will believe." But that depends upon what he 
is enthusiastic about. He couldn't make that mistake if he were enthu- 
siastically influenced by the tones of the Hallet & Davis Piano, to declare 
it the king of instruments. 



The annual expense of the drink bill in Great Britain is £147,288,759, 
and yet we haven't missed any of the politicians from around the City 
Hall recently. That bill wouldn't be so great if they stuck to Napa Soda, 
would it, eh? 

When a man establishes a reputation in a certain department of busi- 
ness, people go out of their way to deal with him. It is so with Muller. 
When a man finds his eyesight failing, he goes for a pair of Muller's 
spectacles. 



ATTi:XTio>. atumra OOMFAHEES1 

RICKARD 8 PATENT OXIDIZING AND CHLORIDIZING FURNACE, 

For Roasting Copper, Silver and Other Ores, prior to Leaching or 

Amalgamate n ! 

The mowt sinking- nihiuiiuurs which II ouVra nbove nil 
other recent InrenUoi snmmi d op MfoUov 

,J,t ' i<- :i ity Mid freight) not oxoeeding 

uid ehlorodlsi twentj tons per day, via : brick work, 
11,000. uid Iron iro r, $500. 

l\i. Short time required for amotion, Ha : 14 day*, after providing all materials, 
« Itn ■ nifltdenoi i ( labor. 

I isry being necessary, Involving 

been treighc to the district whore it m*s b« required, brick and clay, pen< i II] 
.' Bpot, being the chief materials required la its construction, 
ith. No skilled laoor or teuhnical experience is necessary to work it, two ordinary 
luWcm being sufficient to attend to it when ui fall operation. 

6th. itdoea ii"i eostlj gel nut of order, and is readily repaired by an ordinary 
mason or blacksmith when it door. 

0th. The rojalty, or licenso to uac It, iaexceedLH(flv moderate, removing thereby all 
temptation to evade or infringe the patont. 

7th. Calculating laher at S3 per day, and wood att6 per cord, the cost of roast- 
ing is but little over ¥1 SO per ton (ex-salt when ehlorodized), at these high California 
rates for labor and fuel 

One of them is now in the course of erection by the Aztec Gold and Silver Mining 
Company, at their mill in the Aztec District, Santa Rita Mountains, Southern An- 
Eona, ai their office, 802 Montgomery street, rooms 14 and u>, a model may be Bees, 
and working drawings, with all further information necesaary to enableanyordinary 
maeon to uouatruet the furnace, may be obtained from 

COL. J. D. GRAHAM. 
Pamphlets, with illustration and full description, sent on application. Nov. 24. 

AGINT FOR DUPONT'S GUNPOWDER, 
Winchester Repeating Arms and Ammunition, Lake Superior and Pa- 
cific Safety Fuse- 
Dupout's Superior Mining and Blasting Powder, manafac> 
cured expressly for California; Cannon, Musket and sporting Powder; the 
celebrated Diamond Grain and Eagle Duck, No.'b 1, 2 and 3 ; Eagle Rifle, Dupont's 
Sgi KFg and 1'EFg, in kegs, half kegs, quarter kegs and canisters of 4 pound and 1 
pound. Winchester's (Henry's improved) Repealing RMes. Rilled Muskets, Carbines 
and Fixed Ammunition. Lake Superior and Pacific Safety Fuse -in suitable pack- 
ages fur the trade, and warranted not to fail. 

JOHN SlilNKER, Agent for the Pacific Coast, 
Jan. 12. us jfine street, San Francisco. 

VICK'S FLOWER AND VEGEPABLE SEEDS 

Are planted by a million people In America. See Tick's 
CATALOGUE, 300 illustrations, only 2 cents. VICK'S ILLUSTRATED 
MONTHLY MAGAZINE, 32 pages, fine illustrations and colored plate in each num- 
ber. Price, SI 25 a year ; five copies for $5. VICK'S FLOWER and VEGETABLE 
GARDEN, 50 cents in paper covers ; with elegaut cloth covers, §1. All my publica- 
tions are printed in English and German. Address, 
Jan. 5. JAMES VICK, Rochester, New York. 



F. C. Snow.] SNOW & MAY'S ART GALLERY. [W. B. Mat. 

SNOW «!fc MAT, 

IMPORTERS AND MANUFACTURERS OF 

Pictures, Frames, moldings, and Artists* Materials. 

21 Kearny St., near Market, S. F. Dee. 19. 



THOMAS DAY, 122 AND 124 SUTTER STREET. 

Gas Fixtures, Clocks, Bronzes and Holiday Specialties, In- 
cluding Fan Fire Screens, Brass Andirons and Candlesticks, and a choice selec- 
tion of Bisc Ware. Dec. 8. 

W. Morris. Jos. Schwab. J. F. Kennboy. 

MORRIS, SCHWAB & CO, 

Importers and Dealers in Moldings, Frames, Engravings, 
Chromos, Lithographs, Decalcomanie, Wax and Artists' Materials, 21 Post 
street, nearly opposite Masonic Temple, San Francisco. Feb. 4. 



S 



A DEAD SHOT!— 48 OUT OF A POSSIBLE 50! 
teele's Cough Mixture, a compound of Squills, Senega, 

Anise, and other well known Vegetable Remedies. Prepared and sold by 
JAMES G. STEELE & CO., Chemists and Apothecaries, 
Nov. 10. • No 316 Kearny street, bet. Pine and Bush, S. F. 

BAGS, TENTS AND E0SE, 

NEVILLE & CO., 

113 Clay and 114 Commercial Streets, 

San Francisco. [May 24. 



CASTLE BROTHERS.— [Established, 1850.] 

Importers ol Teas and East India Goods, Nos.213 and 215 
Front street, San Francisco. Jan. 13. 

NOBLE & GALLAGHER, 

Importers and Dealers in Painters 1 Materials, House, Sign 
and Fresco Painters, Plain and Decorative Paper-Hangers and Glaziers, No. 438 
Jackson street, between Montgomery and Sansome, San Francisco. Ceilings and 
Walls Kalsomined and Colored. Jobbing promptly attended to. May 13. 



Dan Z. Yost.] [E. F. Child, Member S. F. Stock Exchange. 

CHILD & YOST, STOCKBROKERS, 

No. 322 Montgomery St. [Jan. 12. 

J. BECdTINGES, M.D., 
I the University of Vienna, lias removed to the southwest 

corner of GEARY and DUPONT. Jau. 20. 



o 



T. J. FETTIT & CO.'S 
nbel , Show Card , Engraving and Printing Establishment, 

J 5"28 California street, San Francisco, Cal. July 7. 



F 



NOTICE. 
or the very best photographs go to Bradley * Knlofson's, 

in an Elevator, 429 Slontgomery street. Oct. 29. 

PUBLIC ADMINISTEATOB, WILLIAM D00LAJT, 

Office, No. 12 Nevada Block. [Dec. 8. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Feb. 2, 1878. 



THE FREEDOM OF LABOR. 

Ill these days of scientific and political enlightenment it is extraor- 
dinary to find a vast number of persons who apparently regret the eman- 
cipation of the laborer from the trammels and restrictions of medieval 
times, and who regard every successive step towards free and unlimited 
competition as going backwards. It seems difficult to conceive the reality 
of such beliefs, but they pervade legislation of many nations, and are to be 
found more or less pronounced in the platform of all political parties, and 
especially prominent in that of the Workingmen. 

Time was when there was no such thing as unrestricted labor ; the ar- 
tisan acquired bis knowledge in a recent guild intended to limit the num- 
ber of the workmen and maintain high wages. The workingraan was 
"adstrictus glebe," or fastened to the locality. He could neither travel 
without a passport nor trade without a license. Commerce was restricted 
to a few privileged merchants and monopolies were conferred by_ law. 
Countries were isolated by prohibitory tariffs; wages and the rate of inter- 
est on capital were subjects of legislation, as were also the cut and mate- 
rials of a man's coat and the hour at which he went to bed. 

To-day the same principles assume another form, the Union acts exactly 
like the guild. By it the workmen propose to limit the number of ap- 
prentices, to shorten the hours of labor, and raise the rate of wages. 
Freedom of travel must be again curtailed — Irish and Chinese must be 
made to stay at home. To-day, as in medieval times, some of the first 
necessities of mankind are made monopolies by law. Prohibitory tariffs 
prevent the consumer from buying in the cheapest market, and the pro- 
ducer from selling in the dearest. There are thousands who would like to 
prevent the capitalist from using machinery or from employing laborers 
with a brogue or pig-taiL 

On the latest issued platform it is proposed to re-enact laws against 
usury, whil.-t a foul and disgraceful coramuni ;m threatens to paralyze the 
springs of industry by proposing to restrict the rights of individuals to 
accumulate what the agitators are pleased to call unnecessary nd excessiv 
wealth. All these persons are worshipers, if not consumers, of home 
productions. They denounce low prices, low wages, low profits and the 
abundance which results therefrom. They regard the progress of ma- 
chinery with alarm. They attribute all sorts of evils to "over -produc- 
tion'''' and " excessive competition." They prefer " high wages" and "scar- 
city" and say that it is far better to have a large income and pay high 
prices for "a little" than have low wages capable of buying "much." 
None of these legislative tinkers have any faith whatever in the axioms of 
political economy, they have no confidence in the natural evolution of 
human happiness and welfare, and they object to the survival of the fit- 
test interests, save when exclusively t/ieir own. They have no conception of 
the beneficent law of unrestricted competition as the only reliable main- 
spring of commercial and industrial progress, and the only disinterested 
regulator of human selfishness and folly. They prefer their own narrow 
experiences to regulate labor and commercial intercourse, now altering 
supply and now demand as it suits the caprices of politicians or 
the interests of monopolies. When will the laborers be convinced 
monopolists are promoted by restricted labor, aud that tho&« who repre- 
sent the masses, and the chief consumers, are the most injured by them ? 
Does any sensible man believe that it is in the power of a few thousand 
rice-fed barbarians, who are almost exclusively engaged in occupations 
which are refused by beef-fed whites, to seriously reduce the rate of 
wages? Taken at their best they are only bad machines, to be sent home 
when worn out. Are there not now in Boston thousands seeking work, 
although there are no Chinese ? When will the workingman learn that 
free competition is the only guarantee of justice to his class, and that 
artificial interference is bound to injure him? The whole question of 
wages is summed up in the statement ; " When two workmen run after 
one boss, wages fall ; when two bosses run after one workman, wages 
rise." Free competition secures the presence of bosses where they are 
"wanted, and attracts workmen to the best market. Lastly, these persons 
have no confidence in the power of education, character and race to secure 
society against a return to barbarism. They conceive it possible for this 
State and continent to be overrun by Chinese, who will displace its labor, 
overturn its political institutions, destroy its religion, degrade its morals, 
and reduce its laboring population to the Chinese level ; and to prevent 
the evils they have conjured up, they propose to recur to mediaeval legis- 
lation, to alter treaties, enact restrictive laws, and trample upon princi- 
ples of progress and civilization which were obtained only by the sacrifice 
of many lives. Within the memory of the present generation China was 
closed to strangers. Twice have the Anglo-Saxons gone to war to force 
the right of entry on a reluctant people. Within the open cities, the 
American is now free to labor and to trade. He has introduced his own 
courts and administers his own laws. Iu return he offered equal privi- 
leges, but now, repudiating his own treaties, he seeks to restrain the nat- 
ural interchange of labor, and he wants to deny the Chinese the right of 
settling their quarrels in their own way. The Declaration of American 
Independence was the charter of personal freedom. Sullied for a time by 
slavery, the star-spangled banner is now stainless. Shall the stripes be 
once more smudged with the filth of national exclusiveness, and a post- 
script added to the charter of freedom, declaring that one race shall be 
denied the privilege of doing useful work, and the right of selling its labor 
on this continent, at the market price, and perhaps at less than it is 
worth ? 

Death.— On the 29th instant, at 115 Eleventh Street, San Francisco, 
Florence Kate, the beloved daughter of Dr. and Mrs. W. R. G. Samuels, 
F. A. S., M. K.. C. S., etc., aged 15 years and three months. New Zealand 
and Australian papers please copy. 



SEMI-ANNUAL REPORT OF SAN FRANCISCO SAV- 
INGS BANKS. 

We herewith append the Commercial Herald's semi-annual report 
of the San Francisco Savings Banks, which may be relied upon as being 
accurate. These returns are particularly valuable at this time, following 
as they do upon the heels of a run on some of them, and, undoubtedly, 
more the result of personal malice in some quarters than from any other 
cause. There had been no reason whatever to question their solvency, 
nor doubt the ability of their administrations, and the result fully justi- 
fied this view of the case. The conditions under which we have lived for 
some months past have not been such as would tend to increase deposits 
in these banks, or employ their loanable funds so as to yield their accus- 
tomed profit to depositors, but it is probably only a passing evil that can 



not permanently damage our material interests. It will be seen that the 
total amount of deposits is 860,631,371, to the credit of 70,713 depositors, 
and with an average of §858 gold to each depositor. No other portion of 
the globe can show anything at all comparable with such results, which 
clearly indicate a corresponding moneyed wealth in the possession of our 
industrial classes. 






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2, 1878. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



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-17 



ART JOTT1NGB 
Toby Rosenthal's Uteet work. " ^ \Urmoil,"h*n arrived 

: known that with "Elaine" 

llir artist hiawlf wa5 D*wr mflanad Toe Mibjevt w»* tint i>n<' of his 

-m.*. an.) in pefating it ho always felt that ho waa but carry- 

■ iro waa a aooeeae, an<t gained for Ibt (wvinter kTeat 

■ut it wm .v u a promise "f something 

better i . than a realiz-iti n ••( what might be expected <>( bin). 

mi- has In-cn nobly redeemed in this taut platan, there 

can be n<> cmot, f.-r it is a maatarly woric to era? particular, and one 

apon whit \. be maj - 

All who are familiar with lui rope an art criticisms and those of the 
(toniian press in ('articular, w.ll know that no ordinary pirture could 

died forth tin- many alabonto. and mnamllj favorable (ffitioanuD, 
which wen written apon this work oaring the two monthi it wax on ex- 
hibition in Munich, iWrlin, ami Hamburg. Soma of then ban been 
translated and republished here, ami in none an- found anything adverse, 
except b a, when it u thought the artist had given the young 

ladies apparel too elegant for a I*adies' Seminary. As Rosenthal por- 
trays an American Behool, it in nlpST to us that be has uot been at fault 
in tlii* particular at all. I'nlike the Gennan custom, parents arc per- 
mitted to clothe tlair danghtan as they we fit, and although our Anuri- 
oan girli may often ttodj more closely their wardrobe than their hooks, 
I remains that madame'a supervision does not extend farther in 
this direction than to see that the pupils, in (►ersonal appearance, do just- 
ice to the high-toned character of the institute. 

The pit tun- is full .if humor, without a particle of caricature. Of 
course, the ritoation which calls it into being is an improbable one, al- 
though not impossible, and just here comes the originality of the subject. 
It is evidently bis own conception, ami lie has adopted it, not BO much 
to tell a story as to enable him to place upon canvass twenty-two figures 
in various groups and individual positions. He concentrates all the 
different postoringB and varied expressions upon this idea of his, and it 
seems to have Urn a good one for the various attitudes are marvels of 
ease and gracefulness ; nor can anything be discovered in any of the 
figures or surroundings not in perfect harmony with the subject. 

He might, certainly, have made his work more literal. His story could 
have been told more plainly, but wc must remember that in genre 
painting the subject is seized upon as a means to an end. It is just the 
reverse in historical painting, where a strict adherence to truth is impera- 
tively demanded, and no imagery is allowable which will in any way 
controvert facts or reason. 

Many of the figures which are partially hidden from view might have 
been brought more prominently forward, and some will contend that the 
artist had an excellent opportunity to display (modestly) more of the per- 
sonal charms of the young ladies ; but we must not lose sight of the fact 
that the poetry of a work of art consists as much, or more, in what is 
suggested and not actually seen, as in that which is plainly visible. Im- 
agery is a belonging of human nature, and a good share of the pleasure 
derived from viewing a picture is in the privilege of carrying out, as it 
were, the suggestions made by the painter. 

This can be done by each individual in such manner as seems most in 
harmony with the individual taste, whereas, if the rendering is literal, 
and nothing be left to the imagination, it not only gives less pleasure, but 
sooner tires the vision. 

Many artists would be inclined to give the end of a story in such a 
tableau. Rosenthal avoids this — he marshals his beautiful host up to the 
dreaded door — opens it so that we, in front of the picture, can see the trio 
of cats which have caused the alarm — but instead of letting them see the 
felines, and so end the agony, he startles them with the aid of a broom 
which is falling through the half-open door, but leaves to our imagination 
to paint the jolity which must have prevailed after the denouement. The 
faces of the several young ladies are admirably characteristic of their dif- 
ferent positions in the fray — take for example the two who are armed 
with parasols — that lovely girl to the left, who holds the closed one, would 
never be found leading such a charge. Of quite a different character is 
the red-beaded girl (we should have said blonde or auburn) who, with 
parasol distended, rushes madly to the front with all the impetuosity of 
her fiery nature. Then we have the girl in the lavender dress, she has 
been reading some terrible story from the mysteries of Rudolpho, so 
familiar to every school girl, for a copy of the book protrudes from her 
pocket. Let us observe that beauty who entwines her denuded arms 
around that of Madam's, and see if we cannot see the girl who would hide 
in the old-fashioned clock case to escape from the lightnings stroke 
and the thunder's roll. The little midge, with a red shawl thrown over her 
head, what does she know of danger? there can be none to her where the 
crowd is ! And now the preceptress herself ; who can fail of seeing an 
expression and attitude of forced bravery? Of course she is obliged to make 
a showing of courage as an example for her wards; it is readily imagined 
that if she should give way, all would be lost. How they cling to her from 
every direction ! even the blonde runs to cover at the first evidence of real 
danger, and we all know how it makes courageous mortals of us when we 
are surrounded by cowards greater than ourselves. Madam is evidently 
a martyr to the dignity of the institution over which she presides. 

Even the dog is true to the situation. He is not flurried in the least ! 
Why ? because one of bis senses has served him well: be knew what caused 
the racket before the door opened, and doubtless marveled greatly at such 
an onslaught being made, all at once, upon his natural enemies, the cats. 

Even the castaway bottles may be said to have a character and meaning. 
Their very form suggests that their contents have afortime served a useful 
purpose among the invalided beauties just budding into womanhood. 

In the dim distance, stuck upon a wall-shelf, is seen the picture of a 
couple advancing toward each other ready for a loving salute of some sort. 
This work of art has been consigned to the garret as being unfit for the 
contemplation of innocent youth. 

As to the quality of the picture it is superb, faultless in drawing, rich and 
seneu008, yet harmonious, in color— a charming work, which furnishes in- 
disputable evidence that Mr. Rosenthal, at the early age of thirty, lias 
become a master in his chosen profession. 

The, photographs of Rosenthal's painting, "A Seminary Alarmed," 
have been sent to us. The one, published by Houseworth & Co., is a copy 
of another photograph ; the other photograph by Watkins, is from the 
original painting, and is by far the better picture. The rich tone of a pho- 
tograph is lost when an attempt is made to produce a picture two or three 
removes from the original 



II 



SERENADE. 

[Parapkrtue from I ■■( Wilkftm Bvtch.] 

XI v'ning bj so mild and .l.-ar. And now in white thy limbs adorn- 

. ink-. 
Thou It slumber till to-morrow morn- 
ing. 



What sound is that breaks on mine 
rat V 
■ []L my love, 'tis only I, 

Pol lolOe ri. 

Thy 1 bctrifh sings so tenderly. 

I sec thee by the lamp light, love, 
Around thy little chamber move. 
Thou takes! ofl thy golden ringlets, 
Thy dress, and all the other thing- 
lets, 



Obi should thy bosom softly heave. 

My soul bj near, sweet maid, believe; 
And should then come a little Ilea, 

And crawl "it thee! 
Be still, my love, 'tis only I, 

Bui lol dc ri. 
Thy Dietriofa scratch him tenderly! 



VISCOUNT HUBERT DE ROCALTIER. 

1.4 Skttch from Matfair.) 
A rather pleasant personage has just passed away from Parisian 
society. He was Viscount Hubert de Rocaltier, and was cut off at the 
comparatively early age of forty-two, by a more than usually persistent 
attack of liiliriiim trruirns. It was the Viscount's cheerful habit, from 
nine o'clock till midnight, to patronize the dining-rooms of Haider, Lu- 
cien, or Briebant, If he were hungry he took a piece of bread from one 
table and a piece of pastry or anything else that was handy from another. 
If he were thirsty, he helped himself to a few glasses of wine or cognac— 
the latter by preference. Having eaten and drunk his fill, he was accus- 
tomed to place himself on guard at the door of any ccrck where gambling 

I 




was going on, and, as gentlemen left, he begged the loan of a ten-franc 
piece. As he was known to make refusal a personal matter, and as he 
was a famous swordsman, he generally obtained the loan. Latterly, how- 
ever, the spell began to lose its power, by reason of the difficulty the 
Viscount met with in finding a second. 

Despite his poverty and the smell of brandy which always clung to 
him, his historical name and distinguished title secured for the Viscount 
a certain prestige, particularly among young men from the country. 
Very recently, he had his arms in gold and colors, with crown, helm, and 
shield-bearers, engraved upon his carte, which, on being presented, had 
rather an imposing effect, and brought in the ten-franc pieces more ra- 
pidly. Of course, he never paid the engraver, and possibly never got the 
bill, for he had a way of making known the fact that the presentation of 
an account was a deadly insult to be wiped out only by blood. When his 
last hour approached, he sought the consolation of religion. The priest 
came, and exhorted him to repentance. As the good father left the room, 
the Viscount rang the bell, and addressing the ga/rcon of the hotel where 
he had secured a room, said, " Take down the name and address of that 
priest. He has used toward me a tone that is exceedingly offensive, and 
as soon as I am able to stand I will send a friend to him! " Then he lay 
back and died. 



REMOVED. 
r piic Old Established Steam Gas F 

, 1 tablisbment of J. K. prior has been removed from 780 Montgomery street to 
his new Bve-story-and-a-baeement building, NO. 1128 MARKET STREET and 31 
TURK STREET, where a complete assortment of new patterns ol Qaa Fixtures and 
' ' ibing Materia) ;ire offered at greatly reduced rates. Messages sent by American 



District Telegraph Company free. All jobbinj 
1852. [July 2S.J 



promptly attended to. Established 
J. K. PRIOR. 



D. F. Hutcuinqs. 



J. Sanderson. 



M. Dunne. 

PHQ2HIX OIL WORKS. 

Established lS50.-»]lutchiMga & Co., Oil mid Commission 
Merchants, Manufacturers end Dealers in Sperm, Whale, Lard, Machinery and 



illuminating Oils, r>i7 Front street, San Francisco. 



Jan. 8. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Feb. 2, 1878. 



Special Brevities. 



Ajobtocoax bachelors out of single blessedness and to decrease the 
stock of old maids by an increased demand for wives, may be involved in 
some statements made by the London Review in regard to the relations ex- 
isting between marriage and longevity. Old maids and bachelors, it says, 
rarely attain to extreme old age, and then it tells of people living to ex- 
traordinary ages by wedding a dozen times or so, while Jacob Jay, of 
Bordeaux, died in 1772 at the age of 101 years, having laid seventeen 
wives in the grave, and Margaret MeDowall, a Scotchwoman, died in 
1765, at the age of 105, having wept at the untimely demise of thirteen 
men whose names she had born in rotation. Thus far the Review does not 
put a very extraordinary tax upon one's capacity for bolting a tough mor- 
sel, but the strain is rather severe when it goes on to speak of a pair 
named Eovin who died in Hungary in 1741, the man aged 170 and the wo- 
man 164, leaving a tender youth 116 years old to bewail his orphanage and 
reflect on the strength of that tie which held his parents together for 148 
years. — Boston Journal. 

The buildings of the coming Paris Exhibition in 1878 are the largest 
yet conceived for the purpose. The nave of the main building is nearly 
2,200 feet long ; the vista, which includes the two vestibules, is more than 
2,300 feet ; and each of the transepts and vestibules, more than 1,100 feet. 
The eight industrial courts are all parallel, and are divided into two series 
of four each, one series being devoted to the productions of France, and 
the other to the rest of the exhibitions. In the center of the garden be- 
tween the two series are two ranges of fine art galleries. On the opposite 
side of the river is the Trocaden Palace, which is to be devoted to the his- 
tory of man from the savage state down to the most modern appliance of 
science and art. It will afterwards be used as a municipal museum. 

The new ironclad, Italia, which the Italian Government are. hav- 
ing constructed at Castellamare, will, it is said, be the largest vessel of 
war in the world. Its greatest length will be 120 metres; breadth 22 
metres; draught of water 8.50 metres; diplaceinent 13,000 tons ; and 
weight of the hull alone 5,000 tons. Its armament will consist of guns, 
the exact weight of which is not yet known, but it is at all events to ex- 
ceed 100 tons, and the iron plates with which the hull is to be protected 
will be 55 centimetres thick. It is estimated that the construction and 
armament of this gigantic vessel will cost at least twenty million francs, 
about £800,000. 

There is a melancholy tone in this paragraph from a Washington 
letter : " A lady recently received a dress from ' Worth.' She could not 
get in it. She telegraphed the autocrat to that effect. He answered : 
' Perhaps you attempted to put it on over other clothing. This cannot be 
permitted. I will send by steamer buckskin tights, which is the only gar- 
ment worn with dresses made according to the dictates of fashion.' Alas! 
this is what we have come to. Tights and a piece of muslin basted in the 
train of the dress. Petticoats to be a myth ! No more ruffles, laces, 
tucks, and mysterious dainties." 

■Within ten years, no less than 12,000,000 acres of forest have been 
cut down or burned over in the TJnised States. Much of the timber is 
used for fuel, twenty-five cities being on record as consuming from 5,000 
to 10,000 acres each. Fences use up much timber, and railwaysleepersre- 
quire the product of 150,000 acres per annum. The amount of pine and 
lumber timber yet standing in the forests of the timber States is estimated 
at 225,000,000,000 feet. The sum of ©144,000,000 is invested in the timber 
industry, employing 200,000 men. 

The Japanese mode of cooking rice is extremely simple, and consists 
in putting just enough cold water to prevent the rice from burning to the 
bottom of the pot, which has a close-fitting cover. The water should be 
cold, and the cooking, which is rather steaming than boiling, done over a 
moderate fire. When nearly done, the lid is taken off, the steam and 
moisture are allowed to escape, and the rice turns out a mass of snow 
white kernels. This is similar to the South Carolina method. 

It is said that Prince Leopold has been compelled, at any rate for the 
present, to abandon his intention for taking holy orders. The Prince has 
lately expressed a strong desire to enter the church, and, although her 
Majesty was averse to his selecting such a career, he has, in spite of all 
opposition, held resolutely to his purpose, and finally gained bis point. 
His health is now the only obstacle to his taking orders. — Coming Events. 

As a noticeable sequel to our late reports on the excessive shipments 
of Iron to China and Japan, the last accounts thence advise very low 
priceB, so much so that it would not be surprising that Iron should be 
bought there and shipped to the United States, that is, via San Fran- 
cisco, where it could now be laid down from either China or Japan, at a 
cheaper cost than from London. — European Mail. 

A curiosity is exhibited at a New York cigar factory in the shape of 
cigarette papers made of water-cresse3. They are manufactured largely 
in Spain by a gentleman who was cured of a lung complaint by the use 
of water- cresses. They are of a greenish color, and of a heavy texture. 

It is said that the Chinese Ambassador in London is very strongly in 
favor of preserving the Woosung Railway, and has even gone so for as to 
offer to purchase it himself from his Government, if they will only con- 
sent not to remove it. — Coming Events. 

The Anglo-Brazilian Times states that the Brazilian Government 
has agreed to subsidize a line of steamers belonging to John Poach be- 
tween New York and Rio Janeiro, and that the service will begin in 
March. 

Yer go'n spen every cent what I bring yer home fur striped sfcockin's, 
an' ther ain't nuthin' ter eat in ther house," is what a drunken man was 
telling a barber's pole, when a policeman arrested him. 

It is said that the Countess Maria von Bismarck, only daughter of the 
Chancellor of Germany, is to be married shortly to Count Lehrndorff, 
aide-de-camp to the Emperor. — Coming Events. 

A Montana justice of the peace doesn't splurge any when he mar- 
ries a couple. He says : "Arise ! Grab hands ! Hitched ! Six dollars." 
And that is all there is to it, — Ex. 

Kate Field has been offered a regular editorial position on the London 
Times. This is the highest compliment ever paid to a woman journalist. 

Olive Logan is authority for the statement that jaunty English girls 
are raising their hats to acknowledge salutations, the same as gentlemen. 



REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS 

Recorded in the City and County of San Francisco. California, fox the 
Week ending January 30, 1878. / 

Compiled from the Records of 'the Mercantile Agency of John McKillop & Co., 
41)1 California Street, San Francisco. 



Thursday, January 24th. 



GRANTOR TO GRANTEE. 



DESCRIPTION. 



Paul RoiiBset to Eugene Lies 

J P Locke to Jas E Van Court . . . 
Thos Kearney to Alfr'd A Pardow 

Alf A Pardow to A J Plato 

Seth Robinson to J L Robinson . . 
Jehn Schaefer to Ch'Itha Schaefer 
W J Gunn to Jas Fox and wf. 



O L hks 833, 911,977,934, 1018, 1060, 1061 

Nw Yolo and Caroline, n 33:4x100 

Ne Guerrero and 18th, e 58:9#, n 65, w 
56:2, s(i5:5 

Same 

S O'Farrell, 137:6 w Steiner, w 63x137:6. 

Lots 9, 11, blk 4, Market St Homestead.. 

N Valley, 177:4 e Sanchez, e 51:4x114..., 

Robt McElroy to Richrd Heney JrlS Page, 119 e Laguna, e 27:0x120 

Jas Walker to Hk \Vinkelman Se Van Ness and Willow av, s 27:6x109. 

Jas Keely to Saml Kellett (Nw Mission, 230 sw 6tb, sw 25xS5 

J B Lewis to J Town sent] |N McAllister, 185 w Larkin, w 90x137:6. 

ObaB Kroft to John Moeller Nw 24th and S.inchcz, w 25x80 

Henry Bentbam to Will Benlham.lLot 10, blk L, Rail Road Hd 



$ 1 
200 

2,250 

5 

Gift 

Gift 

750 

2,453 

6,609 

5,800 

337 

525 

Gift 



Friday, January 25th. 



D Gonzalez to Thos Ash worth 

Penncl McCIure to Jas Whartcnby 
A W VonSchmidt to Thos Martin 
Wm E E Dourett to Jos Bluxome 

Donald McKenzie to D Nicoll 



J J Felt to Chas B Gould , 

Henry G Rise to C G Steinwig... 
Helen S Shatter to C M Jackson. 



Wm J Gunn to JaB McDermott . . . 
Thos McLeod to Thos R McLeod. 

John O'Brien to Jas McElroy 

Clans Spreckles to City & Co S F 

Leland Stanford to Same 

John Center to Same 

Sainl F Weeks to Same 

Wm J Shaw to Same 

John Center to Same 

Chas L Dingley to Same .., 

S B Walkington to Geo T Pracy 
J R Pico to J H Collins, jr 



Se Howard, 225 ne 61 h, ne 25x80 

Nw Pierce and California, w 206:3x273. . 
S Sacramento, 82:6 w 20th av, w 25x104, 
Nw Valencia. 305 n Dale, ne 327, nw 120 

ne 25, nw 122:6, ew 361:4, se 174:6 to b 
N Hancock, 205 e Noe, e 50x114; and n 

Slat av, 100 w Columbia, w 25x114.... 

WGuerero, 100 s 24th, s 60x1 35 

W Sherman, 247? 18th, b 25x125 

All interest in Estate of Chas Jackson, 

deceased 

N Haight, 110 w Steiner, w 27:6x112:6.. . 
E Treat av, 175 n 21st, n 550x122:6; and e 

Treaiav,150 n 21st, n 25x122:6 

Nw Mission, 108 sw 1st, nw 53 x ne 24. . 
Portions of M B 50, 49 . . . 
Portions of P B 7, 6, 21, 44, 45, 63, 69, 98. 

Portions of P B 21, 22, 23, 44 

Portion of M B 50 

Same 

Portion of M B 48; and part P B 7 

Portion of M B 50 

S 20th, 90 w Mission, w 37:6x80 

X of l-16th as the Shenebeck Grant.... 



$1,000 
30.0U0 



13,000 



3,600 
800 

1 
1,250 

8.000 
3,000 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
6,250 
5 



Saturday, January 26th. 



Thos Brady to Bridget Cullcn . . . 
W J Gunn to Luca Peirano . . . . 
August Herome to J H Gilmore. . 
Lucia S Norirup to F C Luty. . . . 
Aug Hemme to H M Ellsworth.. 
Same et al to Howard BLand... 



Lot 175, Gift Map Nol 

Nw Pine and Middle, w 27:6x87:6 

N BiiPh, 22:11 e Webster, e 22:11x90. ... 

N Hill, 205 w Sanchez, w 50x115 

Ne Webster and Bush, e 22:11x90 

. S Post, 167:6 w Laguna, w 30x137:6 

Thos Magee to Jas Porteous !Nff Page and Baker, w 133x275 

Wro Ware to Cath F Ware iSeBueb and Jones, e 60x104:6 

AlexE Saiatie to Robt Ewing N Sutter, 57:6 e Stockton, c 80x73:6 

Lewis Goodwin to Julius Baum.JSw Stockton and Washington, s 137:6x 

137:6. 

M A McCabe to Thos Cronin S Pt Lobos av, 120 e West 20th, e 26 x s 

J 100 



2,000 
5,500 
50 
6,250 
8,500 
9.500 
Gift 
51,250 

41.000 



Monday, January 28th. 



Aiis Cameron to And Helraer IS 16th, 100 w Castro, w 25x100 

WmMSeatoutoC Zuchariaa E Ferrie, 300:4 n Pt Lobos av, n t>0x 

| 116:11X 

APhister to Jos Stalder.jr iLot 2, blk U, R R Hd Association. 

Same to Same (Lot 19, blk 270, Pleasant Va| Hd Ass'n 

Wm D E?an to Danl J Delay Sw Tinrley. 122:6 se Aleraauy, se 50x100 

Chas L Weller to Miranda Weller S 81 h and Clementina, se 90x75 

John Mackey to S P Collins |Nw Pt Lobos and 23th aves, n 609, w 141 

I 8 8deg30 miu, e 602:8, e 85:4 to beg... 
D J Oliver to A Varsi et al Nw Van Ness av and Hayes, w 384:9 x 

! 275 

Alvino F Pico to E W Scott TJnd X. <»f Sherback Grant 

M<;rch Ex Bk to H A Charles |S Geary, 212 w Leavenworth, w 23x137:6 

H A Charles and wflo G A Uyde.iSama 



500 
175 
150 
450 
Gift 



200000 

500 

3,000 

8,000 



Tuesday, January 29th. 



Jas M Streeten to Arth Scrivener. 
Milton S Latham to Same 



Wm F Howe to Mary Howe, adm 

Walter S Hobart to Danl Cook. ... 
Patk Murphy to Frank Raymond. 

Frd'and Limbert to M P Ledesraa 
Wm H Gladwin to M S Latham 
Francis* Prnnty to Thos Prmity, 
Chas G Baxter to G S Banks... 
Esther Levy to Marv Wagner. .. 
Jeren I Whittle to W Bradford. 



Thos Norris to Marion E Cassell . 



Ne Oak Grove av, 150 nw Bryant, nw 25 

xl12 

Lots 1 ta 6, 27 to 32. blk E ; lots 13 to 28, 

hlkB: lolsl to 14, 30 to 48, blk 522 ; 

O'Neil & Haley purchase 

Nw Steiner and Fell, w 110x55; and lot 9 

blk 515, B.iy View Homestead A^s'u.. 

W Dupont, 82:6 s Geary, b 28:6x80 

N S.icrameuto, 150 w Devieadero, w 42:6 

xl27:S^ 



S Sacramento, 67 w Dupont, w 22:3x68:9 

Se Sutter and Kearney, e 97:6x137:6 

N Green, 200 w Hyde, n 60 x w 20 

All interest in Sects 24, 25, Tp2 s, R6.. 

Se Sutter and Fillmore, s 55x65 

S California, 192:6 e Broderick, e 27:6 x 

137:6. 

Lot8, blk 10, College Hd Association... 



* 10 



750 
35,000 

25 

10,000 

500 

1,600 

10 

5,000 

1,400 
100 



Wednesday. Jauuary 30th. 



Micbl Caslle to E L Goldstein.. . . 
Geo Cooper to Michl McKenna. . 

Jacob Gundlach to P Frauenholz. 



Robt Winsate to Joseph Moore. . 

LH Bailey to Oliver Dahltan 

JaB C Weir to Aug Heinmc 



B J Shay to James C Weir 
Ans Hemme to As'slnoCbichiznla 
Mary A Mo wry to P'tk II Murphy 
Le Grand Morehouse ro M Latson 
C B Edwards to H J Edwards . . . 
Chas StubbsloCH King 



Se O'Farrell and Van Ness av, e 109x12ft 
S23d, 127 e Noe, e 25x114; part )ot(t,h>k 

135, Terminus Homestead Association 
Ne Montgomery av, 83:71( nwVallejo, 

nw 60:H&, n 65:1%, e 3S:9, s 111:8M to 

begfnniuz 

Sw 1st, 127:10 nw Folsom, nw 27:2x75., , 
W Utah, 50 s Santa Clara, w 100 x s 25. . 
Ne Washington and Washington alley, 

n 81x39 

[Same 

iSnme ;'. 

I W Dolores, 122:6 n Vale, n 25x100 

W Octavia, 42:8 n Oak, n 18:8x68:9 

N Sagamore. 250 e Capitol, e 50x123 

Sw Washington and Devisadero, s 50x 

120 " 



30,000 
450 



5 

6,000 
800 

21,000 

5 

24,000 

650 

4,500 

200 

483 



:\ 187a 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



15 



SIR H 



AND THE EASTERN 



HAVELOCK ON INDIA 
QUESTION. 
Sir Henry Havelock a-llr.- iimllug irf hh ii wUlm irtl 

■ • r referring l<> the Ule * 
ParOu m which induced him logo oat t< tht 

ml o( w»r. Sir Hem 

bad boan < ntirvly to 

pinion* with rw-ijx-t t t" the Kit* torn Qowtion, and that, 

-• formerly he bad DMO KMHOWhAl "»f an alarmist, lie VM DOW DTO* 

mtwI U> declare that there wax no truth in Iho ftllagatioti thai British 

the content between Riuaia and Turkey. H. 

.-t.mily tiaid so, and every day he Imd tDjnt at the seat of war had 
rin him in that OphuOu. What he demurred to w;us 
the assertion that, in holding that view, he had changed from the opin- 
ions which he had expressed a year ago OB the subject. It bad Wen al- 
leged that, in an article of his which was. publiahad in the ForiniffkUg 

, he ha. I dwelt with great force on the hnportanoe to England of 
the Dardanelles, and that he had pointed out, in oonnection 
with the it.. M'nt war, that if things went againxt us that might occur 
which would be fatal to our commerce and the freedom of our passage to 
India. But what he said on that iwiint baforo, he was DOW prepared to 
rej-'at. It seemed to him that almost our only interest, certainly OUT 
main interest, in the Eastern Question, lay in preserving intact from the 
: any Power, W that Power who it mlgnt, the paaaage of our rum 
nierve to India. Upon that i>oint he had not changed Ids opinion one 
iota, and with respect to it be was as strong a < kmaerrative as any inem- 

the QoTernment. He had, moreover, never oonoealed from bin 
Russian friends the views winch he held on the subject. They, on their 
part, he was bound to add, had not hesitated to admit the perfect reason- 
ableness. of those views, and it would be (bond, when their conditions 
came to be stated, that they fully entered into the necessity of the pre- 

"Q intact by England of her passage to India, and that they were 
prepared to shape their course of action accordingly. Indeed, nothing 
was, he believed, further from their wiahes or intentions than to come 
into collision with this country. What was it, then, that we had to fear? 
It was alleged by some that if Russia were to secure to herself certain 
points on the Dardanelles and BoBphortSB, our route to India would be 
Imperiled. Now, as he had said before, he held as strongly as any one 
could the opinion that the passage through the Suez Canal for our com- 
merce—seeing that seven-eighths of the traffic which went through it was 
English traffic, so that it had become in a sense partly English territory — 
should be completely open, and that we were perfectly within our right 
and within what was reasonable and just in proclaiming to all the world 
that we did not propose to allow it to be touched, and that if it were 
touched or hazarded we should be prepared to go any lengths which be- 
came a brave and resolute people to preserve that which was justly and 
honorably ours. But again rose the question, What had we to fear ? To 
him the discussion on the subject in the newspapers and the magazines 
appeared to have gone singularly wide of the real point at issue. By 
BOtne it was maintained that all we had to do was to fortify the entrance 
to the Suez Canal at Port Said. Looking at it from a military and stra- 
te.'ical point of view, that, he believed, was one of the greatest errors ever 
entertained. The real point involved — and the Russians knew it very 
well — was the stretch of sea about 900 miles long, between Malta and 
Port Said. If in the future — and it is in the very remote future, if at all 
— Russia or any Power were to get possession first of all of the whole of 
the navigation of the Black Sea, with a large and formidable fleet, and 
afterward to obtain possession of one of the banks of the Dardanelles— 
both banks at present belong to Turkey — so as to be able to open and 
close at will the passage, and exclude us from it, then in that case he was 
bound to admit that there would be a certain amount of hazard to our 

ice going to the East. We could not always keep a large squadron 
at Beaica Bay. Seven-eighths of our commerce had not only to pass 
through the Suez Canal, but had to get safely to the entrance there — the 
danger lying not in the Canal, but in the long stretch of sea to which he 
had referred. But, the most favorable conditions being granted, suppos- 
ing Russia to have a considerable fleet, and that we being engaged in war 
with some other Power, could not employ against her the whole of ours, 
it might in these circumstances be possible that a few privateers, like the 
Alabama ill the American Civil War, might make considerable havoc 
among our commerce, and even destroy it in the course of a few weeks. 
That, he believed, was the extreme of the question as against ourselves. 
But what were the real facts? Russia had never asked for one bank of 
the Dardanelles, and the surest proof of that was in the pledge of the 
Emperor himself. He had distinctly proclaimed that he did not desire to 
occupy Constantinople, or to go near it. What was it that we were hear- 
ing in the newspapers just now? It was supposed by some that one of 
the conditions which Russia would exact would be, that in order to obtain 
free passage the forts of the Dardanelles should be dismantled. What 
would be the result? Why, that the passage of the Dardanelles would 
be free, not only to the ships of Russia, but also to the ships of England. 
That being so, he would leave the meeting to judge which would be likely 
to be the preponderating naval Power iu that quarter — Russia or our- 
selves. At the present moment Russia had no fleet in the Black Sea — at 
least, no fleet worthy of the name, except we were to speak as such of her 
two circular ironclads, which had scarcely shown themselves of late. Be- 
sides, whatever might be the result of the struggle in which she was now 
engaged, Russia must come out of it dreadfully impoverished, as the re- 
Bttft of the efforts she had been obliged to make. If, then, her future 
naval resources were to be divided between the Baltic and the Black Sea, 
it is clear that her fleet in the Black Sea must always be inferior to our 
Own ; so that even if Russia were to receive such a preponderating influ- 
ence over Turkey as to induce her to close the passage of the Dardanelles 
to our ships, we should still be much better off in that position than now, 
for we should be more favorably placed, so far as taking care of our in- 
terests was concerned, without the Turkish alliance than with it, to say 
nothing of the enormous cost in human life and treasure which that alli- 
ance had entailed upon us, or of the moral degradation which we had in- 
curred by being in some degree participators in her abominable crimes. 
(Cheers.) Suppose, then, such an almost impossible state of things to 
come to pass as that Turkey should be so beaten as to be compelled by 
Russia to close the passage of the Dardanelles against our ships of war, 
we should still have our remedy, he contended, by taking possession, not 
by plunder or force, but by the more peaceable means of purchase, of the 
Island of Mitylene, which had two deep harbors with good anchorage. 



T 



The result of the Adoption of such a course would be that, as regarded 
Ition in the M a, our route to India, the aafety of our 

commerce, and an tannn of our Baatern poaseesiona, we •faonld find our 
nl mora secure than it was at the present mo- 
ment, beoaOM then the fleet would be the Kunrdian of our int'-re-<t-«. We 
should 1h- wsfe from the main land, and our fleet would face tho entrance 
t • th« l tardiiu. -lies. It was an old and sound strategical principle that if 
it was sought to meet an enemy who mi Doming through adoflle or gorge 
it was the wisest course to wait for him in a convenient position oul 
tndsuoh was exactly the condition whloh wonld be fulfilled bylht 

of the bland of Mitylene, should we find ourselves placed in an 
extremity which he looked upon JL s hardly probable. 

Referring to Armenia and the Euphrates Valloy route to India, Sir 
Henry continued) 

It was <iid that if Armenia passed into the hands of BiiHsia. she would, 
in some mysterious way, make the Euphrates Valley the means of moving 

her troops to India. Now, the question afl bo whether we ourselves, who 
were most interested, should ever make the Euphrates Valley a line of 
communication with India was considered fully in 1H71 by a committee of 
the House of Commons; and after the question had been examined in 
every possible way, the alarmists themselves being represented on the 
committee, the conclusion arrived at was that the Euphrates Valley was 
not likely to become of the slightest importance to us, and that it was 
not worth our while expending one penny upon it. The Indian Govern- 
ment, also, after turning the thing over, and carefully looking into it in 
Council, determined not to lay out a single rupee on a railway through 
that valley. Thus the alarmist views came to this, that we were to go to 
war with Russia for an imaginary line which did not exist— a line which 
had been condemned for military purposes as regarded ourselves, and 
which, for just the same reasons, would be equally disadvantageous for 
Russia, because if she ever constructed such a railway and sent her troops 
by it, the moment they reached the Persian Gulf they would come in 
contact with our ironclad fleet. — Overland Mail. 

A RARE CHANCE. 

TO LEASE FOR A NUMBER OF TEARS, 

he World-Renowned and Magnificent Three-story Edi- 
fice, 

THE HONGKONG HOTEL, Hongkong. 

This spacious and commodious hotel is situated in the very heart of the business 
part of the town, near the PRAYA, and in full view of the lauding places of all the 
mail and coasting Bteamers. The building has every 

MODERN IMPROVEMENT, 

and all the conveniences, an elegant bar, billiard rooms, reading rooms and a DINING 
HALL, which will accommodate 
TWO HUNDRED PERSONS, ETC., ETC. 
For photographic views, plans and further particulars, apply to 

DEGENER & CO., 
Jan. 19.] 319 California St. 

Tenders for Transmission to Hongkong; received at our of- 
fice until February 15th, 1878. 

— _____ _ _ __ 

522 Montgomery Street, 

Sole Agents for O. II. Stuuini A Co., Reims, Champagnes ; 
l'lanat & Co., Cognac, Brandies ; W. & J. Graham & Co., Oporto, Port Wines ; 
Al. Moreno Demora, Pto. Sta Maria, Sherries ; E. Anheuser & Co.'s Brewing Associa- 
tion, St. Louis, Lager Beer ; Jules Merman 6lCo., Bordeaux, Clarets and Sauternes * 
P. A. Muiiiin, Frankfort O. M., Hock Wines. Dec. 8. 

SEALED PROPOSALS. 
tate of Calif ornia, Department of State, Sacramento, De- 
cember 24th, 1877. — Sealed proposals for translating into the Spanish language 
such laws as may be authorized by the Legislature now in session, will be received at 
this office until 12 o'clock M. on the FOURTH DAY OF FEBRUARY, 1S78. Envelopes 
inclosing each bid should be indorsed, "Bids for translating laws, etc., into the Span- 
ish language." [Jan. 19.] THOMAS BECK, Secretary of State. 
____________ ^_ .___ 

A gentleman, with good connections abroad, is desirous of 
forming a partnership with another gentleman having the command of cap- 
ital, and of good social standing, with the view of establishing a foreign and local 
business of importance. A thorough knowledge of the resources of the State, agri- 
cultural and mineral, is indispensable. 
Jan. 19. Address, P. 0. Box 1530, San Francisco. 

MME. B. ZEITSKA'S INSTITUTE, 922 POST STREET. 

French, German and English Day and Boarding School for 
Young Ladies.— The next term will commence January 3, 1S7S. Kindergarten 
connected with the Institute. For particulars, address 
Jan. 5. MME. B. ZEITSKA, Principal. 

THOMAS DAY, 

Importer of every variety of Gas Fixtures, Crystal, Gilt, 
Steel and Bronze, and a full assortment of Marble and Bronze Clocks and fine 
Bronzes; also a full line of Plumbers' Goods. 122 and 124 Sutter Street, San Fran- 
cisco^ Jan. 27. 

BLANK BOOKS 

Sold from stock or manufactured to order from the Carew 
Extra Fine Ledger Paper, by JOHN G. HODGE & CO., Importers, Manufac- 
turers and Wholesale Stationers, 327, 329 and 381 Sansome street, S. F. Nov. 11. 

MILLS' SEMINARY. 
he next term will commence on Wednesday, January 9th, 

1878. For circulars or information, apply to KEY. C. T. SlILLS, 
Jan. 6. Brooklyn. 



s 



T 



BEST FOOD FOR INFANTS, 

Supplying the highest amount of nourishment in I lie most 
digestible and convenient form, SAVORY & MOORE, 143 New Bond street, 
London, and all Chemists and Storekeepers throughout the world. June 30. 

A- D. REMINGTON 

Successor to F. M. Spaulding A Co., Paper Warehouse, 411, 
118 and 415 Sansome street, San Francisco. 

F. M. SPAULDING and F. VV. AINSWORTH, 
A. D. REMINGTON, New York- {July 7.] Managers, San Francisco. 



|f Jan. 



OFFICES OF THE AEROPLANE NAVIGATION CO., 

No. 007 to 015 Merchant street, San Francisco. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Feb. 2, 1878. 



LIES OF THE DAY. 

A lie has no lees, and cannot stand: but it has wines, and can fly far ai_d wide.— 
Wvbburtok. "With the adaptability of a lie, sinhaamaDy tools, but a. he is the handle 
which fits them all.— Lokd Bhougham. A lie begets others: one lie must be thatche < 
with another, or it will Boon rain through.— Loan Thttelowe. 

" And the Parson made It his text that week, and he said likewise, 
That a lie which is half a lie is ever the blackest of lies : 
That a lie that is all a lie may be met and fouRht with outright, 
But a he which is part a truth is a harder matter to fight. — TenntsoN. 

It is not true that Keub. Lloyd is not a smart boy, for he is. He 
turned the reporters out of Court the other day, and then turned reporter 
himself.— That anything he failed to report in the Chronicle was mate- 
rial to the issue.— «That he has now an undisputed monopoly in the 
reportorial business, so far as it relates to such cases as that on trial in 
the Fifteenth District Court.-^That the reporters were very properly 
turned out, as of course it was done in the interests of morality. Of course 
it was.— That, however, the fertile imaginations of average readers will 
more than supply all omissions. Indeed, they will.— That it's lucky to 
have a rich client who is unlucky in getting into big scrapes.— That it 
gives Eeub. more than he can do, and enables him to give an occasional 
plum to McAllister, Barnes, Marshall, et ate.—— -That, therefore, by 
virtue of his patronage he is "Leader of the Bar. "^— That speaking of 
morality reminds us that the President of the United States has recently 
set a noble example. He dismissed the New York Pension Agent, be- 
cause he was defendant in a suit for divorce, on the grounds of adultery, 
to which he had no answer. All honor to the President !^— That Tom 
Shannon, and other heads of departments on this coast, had better imi- 
tate the President and his precedent.— —That there is a case in the 
Custom House worse than that of the N". Y. Pension Agent.—— -That it 
has become a public scandal that cannot be ignored.-^— That if Tom, as 
the head of a family, does not think it worth his attention, the President 
will.— That the Cosmopolitan folks have been greatly exercised all 
week about No. 12.— That Duncan and Le Warne were not in it, but, 
like most troubles, there was " a woman in it."— That in order to pre- 
vent peeping through the cracks a blind was nailed up with a Spear's head 
on it, but that did not hide the Smith who made the nails, nor the Car- 
penter who drove them, from the man who clinched 'em.— That this 
has any reference whatever to Spears of the Custom House. — That 
Pierson and his clerks are about to take notice and govern themselves 
accordingly. -^— That their, perhaps, sufficient excuse is, that "the trick 
was played upon them without their knowledge," but that excuse exists 
no longer.— That No. 12 corresponds with the number of letters of in- 
quiry upon the subject received from guests. ^— That George Roberts is 
about to train himself in the noble art of self-defence preparatory to the 
next encounter. That he was overpowered in the last one. That the 
leslier proved a flesher, as the borders of George's peepers showed.^— 
That to be whipped by a woman is indeed hard, cause people somehow 
will laugh at j t ou.— -That the game of the she Colonel Fritz is played 
out, and if she must play Juliet, she had better go to the "fat boy " and 
her legal Borneo.^— That the " old boys"' do not enjoy themselve now-a- 
days.^— That their gray heads and bald pates give tone to the front row 
of the parquette at the California Theater.— That Joe Clark likes the 
end seat on the right hand side, and goes to sleep between the ballets. 
That John Benson and John Clement prefer the chairs near the center 
aisle. That Reub. Lloyd is in treaty for the leader's stool. -^That 

Sam Middleton has a season ticket, and neither Ned nor Aleck can rest 
easy at home nights, without first having a look at Prince Caprice. 
— =-That Harry Logan and Baron Wilke use the same opera glass, it 
being of double magnifying power.— That Budd and Staples are 
inclined to stand in the rear, and nobly cover the retreat.-^ That 
Bacon tells the other deacons of the Church all about it.— 
That Ned Cahill has had extra lenses put into his goggle cases. —That 
the Leg Drama is more suited to the average California mind than the 
.Legitimate.— That the Union Square Company was " so nice," but the 
California ballet is " so naughty. "-^That the medical fraternity need 
some friend to guide their faltering footsteps. ■ ■ That MacNutt has the 
monopoly of the Lick House business.— That he had better devote his 
attention to the manufacture of "milk for babies."— That Alfred did 
not give him any patent rights superior to Billy's.- — " That Mariah and 
Asa live at the Grand in style, while the old iady " takes her regular 
praties at the expense of the Church, thanks be to God for all his mer- 
cies."— —That the Countess and Brooks will regulate it after a while, 
when stocks have a Spring rise.- — That ex-Governor Romualdo had bet- 
ter come home. ^— That the Washington people are a fickle set.— Let 
the M alone. ' - That in the meantime it would be well to give the horses 
a rest. — That Tom Edmondson goes over to North Beach, nights, to 
look for lost opportunities.-^ That he finds them nearer home, prome- 
nading Kearny and Market streets. That Neddie Hooper (sweet Ned- 
die) is very modest nowadays. ^— That the shrinkage is unaccountable. 
—That Natorp, with the cheeks of vermilion hue, must not do so any 
more, or attention will be called to it.— That Von Schmidt has 
decided to bring the King Phillip into port via the Cliff House road 
route. —That it ;b a more fernble scheme than Tahoe Water.-^— 
That the sweetness, flavor, deceucy and morality of Lennie's room, 
No. 12 at the Revere, pale their ineffectual fires when compared to 
Annie's Np. 12.^— That the guests at the Cosmopolitan think so.— — 
That the CalVs criticisms in regard to the Police Department 
wonld be more independent if its reporter did not hold two highly paid 
positions therein ——That to be interpreter, Police Court Clerk and the 
CalVs special Police Commissioner, all in one, is any too much, in these 
hard times, for a good simple-minded youth who regularly says his 
prayers, keeps his nose clean, and above all keeps on the right side of old 
Pickering and the Police Department. 



Dr. Carver has had a scarf-pin made which shows the manner he intends 
surprising the Eastern people in glass ball shooting. His trick horse, 
" Jumping Jack." holds the rifle in his mouth with a grip only equaled by 
that of the doctor when he gets hold of an aching incisor. The glass ball 
is placed on the horse's head. By a newly invented twist and bent barrel 
called "The Molar Boomerang," he can shoot in a circle so that the bul- 
let will, after a quarter-mile circuit, return to the glass balL This won- 
derful shooting trick, the doctor says, can be repeated faster than the 
horse can trot; but we have private information that he will win on that, 
as the horse is lame. 



THE SOUTHERN PACIFIC AHEAD. 
It is very apparent, from the tenor of press dispatches from Wash- 
ington, that the Southern Pacific Railroad Company's interests are ahead 
and that Tom Scott and his Texas Pacific are nowhere. The great Scott 
power, of which at one time the dailies were full, turns out to be a very 
hollow shell after alb We were told how that power was to virtually 
elect the Speaker, who was to mold Committees to its interest, and that a 
huge subsidy was a certainty. There was to be a solid South, a solid 
West, and a divided East in its favor. It was claimed to be irresistible. 
But it turns out that this was all tall talk. Whilst Scott was blowing, 
the Southern Pacific people were working. They were quietly but suc- 
cessfully pushing on their road to the Colorado. They were making ar- 
rangements with the Government and people of Arizona for a franchise 
for their road through that Territory. Those arrangements were satisfac- 
torily completed, and now only await the ratification of Congress, which 
will hardly be refused. The Territorial Legislature is the best judge of 
what is needed for that region, and therefore its Acts for the furtherance 
of local interests, which at the same time will serve national ones as well, 
will certainly not fail of hearty indorsement at the hands of the people's 
representatives assembled in Washington. So soon as that indorsement 
is given, a new departure in the affairs of the Southern Pacific will take 
place. The road will then be pushed forward east of thejColorado, and 
soon the whole of Arizona, which has been described as " the treasure- 
house of the continent," will be opened up, to the great advantage of 
capital as well as of labor. The future of that great territory will be con- 
trolled from the Pacific coast, and for this reason, if for no other, our 
people will rejoice that a Californian company has triumphed over an 
Eastern one in securing the control of a road whose influence upon the 
material welfare of this State is bound to grow to vast proportions. Gov- 
ernor Stanford evidently knew whereof he spoke when he described the 
trains entering our city laden with the wealth of Arizona and Mexico as 
an early possibility. The Southern Pacific enterprise is a noble one, big 
■with advantages to our city. 

THE LEGISLATURE FIXING WATER RATES. 

The members of the Legislature are up to their eyes in work, and 
we must confess that they are doing most excellent work too. The police 
bill is a good measure, which we have treated of elsewhere. Swift's bill 
to bring the Spring Valley Water Company under the operation of law, 
and to give the taxpayers some rights which even that company is bound 
to respect, is a measure that ought not to meet with opposition, especially 
from the company and its friends in the San Francisco delegation. When 
the Board of Water Commissioners recently proposed to accept the Blue 
lakes scheme, the Spring Valley people replied with considerable force 
that there was no need to do that — that their supply was sufficient for 
many years to come, and that since the recent decision of the Supreme 
Court, the Legislature could fix rates, and so remove cause of complaint 
on the part of the people. This, the company said, it was quite willing to 
see done. Upon that understanding public clamor has ceased. The 
people are quite willing that Spring Valley shall continue to enjoy its 
monopoly of selling them water, but they will not tolerate any departure 
from the implied bargain that the rates are to be regulated by law, and 
fixed at figures that whilst they are fair to the company, shall be just 
towards consumers. That, we understand, to be the compromise that has 
been ageeed upon all round. It ought now to be carried out in good faith. 
We do not believe that it is to the real interest of the company to seek 
to evade its share of the agreement, and we think the more thoughtful of 
the directors will, upon reflection, see that it is not. We think it is the 
best possible advice to them to haul off their lobbyists, withdraw their 
pressure from Anderson, Gildea and other friendly legislators, and aid, 
rather than retard, the passage of so needed, so popular, and withal so 
moderate a measure as that introduced by John F. Swift. If that bill 
does not pass, a worse evil will assuredly befall them. A word to the wise 
should suffice. 

CLOSED DOORS. 
It maybe necessary sometimes to conduct legal proceedings with 
closed doors, but it is a process which should be rarely resorted to, and 
when it is, it ought to he made effective. Better have full reports than 
garbled ones. If the Court has power to exclude the public, it would 
seem to follow that it has power to punish for contempt those who virtu- 
ally defy its order, by publishing proceedings which it has declared are 
not to the advantage of public morality. Be that as it may, it is certain 
that the secrecy ought to be effective, or it should not be attempted at all. 
It is better to have open doors and open exhibitions of even immorality, 
rather than tolerate the still more mischievous, because more insidious 
suggestions of immorality which are being published as the outcome of 
an unfortunate trial now going on in this city. A circumstance is told 
which illustrates the morbid appetite of those who ought, by virtue of 
their education, to have a higher taste: "One of the counsel for the de- 
fense, looking around the room, noticed that it was full of spectators, and 
addressing the Court, said: ' I should like to see the rule (excluding the 
public) enforced,' Whereupon Judge Dwinelle said: 'AH who are not 
attorneys will leave the room.' Not a man stirred, and the Judge re- 
peated the order in a loud tone of voice, .with the same result. The first 
speaker cast his eyes over the large audience and remarked: 'Goud God! 
if a eulogy were being pronounced on the Chief Justice of the State, 
there would not be half the lawyers present that there are in this Court 
now.'" If the interests of the weaker side could be adequately guaran- 
teed, it would be well if all such trials could proceed in the presence <>f 
those alone interested. If the press were what it ought to be, it would 
matter little whether the doors were open or closed, for in that case due 
discretion would be exercised as to what should be published. They 
manage these things better in some places we know of. 



Chief Kirkpatrick athis Post Again — Chief Kirkpatrick has so far 
recovered from his attack of rheumatism, that he has been able to get to his 
office and transact business. He has been out for two or three days. He 
says that he will make a statement in a few days regarding the escape of 
Duncan and La Warne from the house on Fell street, occupied by Mrs. 
White. 

Russia's great journalist is Katkoff. We have heard him at mid- 
night dictating Katkoff articles from the back fence. 






Postscript 




TO TKB 

CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 




om<-< — <»<>~ to <;«."> Merohant Wiropt. 



VOU'UE L8 



f AN FRANCISCO, FEB. 2 1878 



NUSIBSR 2. 



'Biz.' 



We remark a very gomxiU relief and confident fading abroad re- 
rity of the Pacific slope in bo far as a copious 
usnrance of large crop yields, and gives 
r miner thai he will nut seek in vain for the gold- 
hidden 1 bin owner and merchant; sees at a 

. glance thai employment is to be famished, and at remunerative 
large fleet of Ma-going vessels, while our steam coasters, 
north ai that then will be an immense amount of produce for 

them t" convey t" market. Our railroads see a largely increased carrying 
_ up ti< them which will, in the ordinary course of tilings, re- 
orainary amount of rolling stock to carry to market. The 
1 M n! Steamship Company have already arranged for a tri-monthly, 

between this and Panama, and bo on down the "west const." 
'1 his shows that the Isthmus carrying trade is growing apace, keeping step 
with the growth »>f the Nation, and that business on the Paci6c slope 
- trade and traffic enough for both the;TransPaeific Railroad 
: ha Continent and that highway of travel across the Isthmus of 
- me curious facts arc presented by the earning trade uf the 
Central Pacifi 1 itward for the years 1876 ami 1877, as shown 

by the monthly n ports of J. » '. Stubl s. General Freight Agent. It is to 
be regretted that a like table could not be made out by the Company, 
showing in a similar manner the west hound freight over the Railroad 
which arrives here daily and is distributed along the Pacific slope, al- 
though much the largest portion is dropped in San Francisco. 

EXPORTS F.AUT BV CENTRAL PACIFIC R. R. 



1870 -Lbs. 
Barley 1 ; 



■ 
■ 



Ooffco 

■ 

. I (reeil 

Fruit, !■ 



■ml l'elts. 

Hope 

Leather 



435.133 

251,048 

100,254 
1,071,580 
0,794,270 

1 ... . 1 

2*8,285 

4,682,248 

73S.154 



1877.— Lbs. 

105,900 

>.i;,u:;o 

201,277 

666,027 

3,711,868 

2,084,983 

5,013,118 

804,980 

270,511 

4,712,413 

1,470,778 

901,806 



1876. -Lbs. 1877.— Lbs. 

Quicksilver. 711,550 597,430 

haisins 47,320 210,722 

Rice 81,200 262.000 

Silk 957,432 1,005,231 

Salmon S,90.i,b70 7,809,207 

Skins and Furs . . 316,065 1,200,418 

Tea 19,316,851 14,220,302 

Tobacco and Cigars 169,804 94,425 

Wine 5.55H.832 6,420,478 

Wool 48,499,833 04,002,471 

Wheat 875 

Whalebone 70,113 



182,045 

The most important business transaction of the week under review 
lias been the Coal contract made by the Seattle Company with the Cen- 
tral Pacific Railroad Company, wherein the former agrees to supply the 
latter with 5,000 tonB average quality Seattle Coal per month, for the 
I 7 \ at $5 ;> ( > per ton) and for Screenings S4. Should the railroad 
require more than the quantity of 00,000 tons, as specified, it is to be fur- 
nished at same price. This, then, accounts in a great measure for the 
continued indifference upon the part of the local trade to give forward or- 
ders for Scotch and English Coals at any reasonable price. Heretofore 
dealers gave cargo orders freely for West Hartley and other choice Coals, 
to arrive months ahead, and at prices returning fair freights to shippers ; 
but such is not now the case. Orders are difficult to procure at any price. 
During the past week 1,500 tons English Steam Coal — say, one-half the 
cargo of the ship Three Brothers — has been sold at SO 62+, to be delivered 
at Oakland wharf. The present spot price of West Hartley Coal is §8 50. 

Quicksilver. — The bad roads und continued rain storms have lessened 
receipts for the time being, while the export demand is light. Neverthe- 
less, the bonanza mines have, it is said, been free buyers here during the 
week, at the current low rates. Within the past few days some 5,000 
flasks have changed hands at 42@42ic, and at the iDside rate there are 
still free buyers. It has been found impossible to form any combination 
among producers that would stick, and therefore holders concluded to 
break the market and close out accumulated spot stocks. 

The Coffee demand is good for all lots of strictly prime new crop 
1 American, several hundred bags having been parted with at 19 ^ c. 

Sugar supplies are very light, and the Refiners find it difficult to pro- 
sufficienoy to keep busy — in fact the Bay is now idle, and the Cali- 
fornia running only half its capacity. The Australia from Honolulu 
brought only 2,100 pkgs. There are cargoes due here from Manila, etc., 
that are quite anxiously looked fir by the Refiners. We remark full sup- 
plies of Eastern refined now offering upon the market. We quote Cube, 
ed, etc, at 11 A o; Golden Coffee, UJ c; Hawaiian, G to 9$ c, accord- 
ing to quality. 

Rice.— Thu Chinese seem to have retired from the market until after 
their New Year celebration; we quote No. 1 China, G± c ; No. 2, 6 c ; mixed 
China, 5A c; Hawaiian table 5j @ 5g c. 

Borax.— The present export demand is light, and prices the same as for 
months past, Ray '>■_. c for Concentrated, and 8 @ 9c for Refined, 



Bags --The late heavy rains throughout the State have 1 1' initiated buy- 
era of Burlap grain sacks bo enter the market for .May and Jnne deli 
with sales oi £2x36 standard bags, at o, 1 @ 10c. 

Salmon, --The market for Case Salmon is very quiet-out ■ '■■ ■ 
1 lb tins quotable at £1. 45. Beet < Oregon. Columbia River brands, - ■ 
■"rl.oo. The present spot stock is quite liberal. 

Canned Meats.— Wilson. Merry & Co.. and the Cutting Company 
continue to put up more or leas Beef ami Mutton for the e sport trade 
quality. Al. Of the former brand, we note sales of 100 cs. 2db. tins Corned 
Beef >■); < : <t<> c& Deviled 11am, £-lb tins, for export, 93-per doz. 

Freights. — British iron ships,. now in port, are demanding £2 10*. for 
wheat charters to Liverpool. TLe advance over the lowest freight rates 
in December are now £1 and upwards. The engagements for the week 

include British bark Dibhur, 1255, wheat to Cork, £2 7s. (id.; British 
ship New York, 2704, wheat to Liverpool, laid on; British ship The 
Douglass, 1494, wheat to Liverpool, £2 7s. Gd.; ship Occidental, 1524, 
wheat to Liverpool, £2 2s. fid. ; ship Agenor, 1488, wheat IT. K., private; 
British ship Patterdale, 1200, wheat to Liverpool, £2 7s. Gd. At this 
writing we have some 25 vessels in port disengaged, of a registered ton- 
nage of 30,000 tons. 

Flour.— We remark a quiet market. Small sales for export at 84 75® 
S5 for Superfine; E\tra Superfine, $5 25(5:5 50; Extra Family and Baker's 
Extra, S6(a>6 50; Golden Age, Golden Gate, Genesee Mills, Sperry's, 
Stockton City Mills, Silk dressed, now commands $0 75@7 for the city 
trade. 

Beef and Pork.— -We note a fair export trade, with sales 220 bbls. 
Mess Beef, S3 75@9; 45 bbls. Extra Mess do. $10; 40 bbls. Eitra Prime 
Pork, $17; 25 bbls. Extra Clear Pork, 823 50. 

Bacon, Haras and Lard —Sales, 30,000 lbs. California Bacon, ll(g>, 
13c., sales, 75,000 tbs. Eastern Sugar-cured Hams, 13@14c; 250 cases Cali- 
fornia Lard, 10-Ib. tins, ll@lljc. 

Butter and Cheese.— Good to choice fresh roll Butter, 30@32ic; fair 
to good do., 25@27ic. Cheese is scarce, with sales at 18@20c. 

Potatoes. — Receipts are light, owing to the storm and bad roads. The 
best quality are worth 2c; fair to good, li@lfc; Sweets are scarce, at 
lie 

Wool. — The stock is well nigh exhausted. Sales, 125,000 lbs. Oregon, 
private. General quotations nominal. 

Hides.— Supply is free. Dry, 16@16&o.; Wet, 8®9c. Tallow- is in 
fair demand, at 7c. for Rough, and 9c. for Refined. 

"Wheat. — The demand is equal to the supply, with free export pur- 
chases within the range of $2 05@2 15 \fi ctl. Sales for the week in the 
aggregate 75,000 ctls., within the range. 

Barley.— The market has collapsed, Feed selling at ?1 45@1 50; Brew- 
ing, §1 60@1 65. 

Oats. — Receipts from the North are large, with small rates within the 
range of $1 55@1 95 # ctl. Extra choice, 2c $ lb. 

Rye. — Several car loads are to hand from Omaha. Price, §2 25@2 45 
D? ctl. 

Corn.— The demand is good at §1 55@1 GO # ctl. for Yellow. 

Buckwheat is in light request at SI 50 $ ctl. 

Bran and Middlings have delined to $22 50@25 and S30@32 50 $ 
ton respectively. 

Hay. — With very free receipts prices have dropped to $12 50@17 50 t? 
ton. 

From the Orient.— The O. and O. steamship Gaelic, from Hongkong, 
is to hand, via Yokohama, with a large cargo of Teas, chiefly in transit 
for the East by rail. Also, Hemp 1,000 bales; Rice, 17,160 mats ; Sugar. 
240 mats; Sago, 125 cs.; Tapioca, 428 pkgs.; Nutmegs, 25 C3., and a large 
quantity of ^unspecified merchandise. 

From the Colonies. —The Pacific Mail ship Australia, 26 days from 
Sydney, arrived on the 29th instant with Government mails, passeni 
etc., and for cargo 593 ingots tin, etc. From Honolulu she brought 2,100 
pkgs Sugar, 50 bales Pulu, Rice, Paddy, etc. 

Stock Sales. — Transactions for the week embrace 205 shares Spring 
Valley Water at 91c; 1,000 Dupont-street bonds, 9H ; 100 shares Bank 
of California, private. 

Freights. — Within the past 4S hours several ships have been chartered 
tit loud wheat for the United Kingdom at 50 shillings, and at date, 52s. 
Gd. is now asked for British iron vessels to Cork for orders, 



Feb. 2, 1873. 



POSTSCRIPT TO THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER, 



Condensed News of th3 We ek* 

LOCAL. 

Monday, Jan. 28th.— The Russian corvette Craysser, Captain Nasi- 
moff, arrived in port yesterday morning* thirty-four days from Callfto; 
She is 1,330 ton's burden, and her compoufld engines are 250 horse power. 
Sb» carries 18 officers and 160 men, and the passage was made 1 Under Bail 
fWin the port named.— In the City Criminal Court this morning, upnn 
calling" the case of Dennis Kearny, charged with violating the Gibbs or- 
dinance, Delo3 Lalte moved for an indefinite continuance of the cases 
against Kearney, Knight, Wellock and others. The continuance was 
grarited. 

Tuesday, 29th.— The case of Johh Parrotfc Vs. E. S-. Floyd is being 
argued before the Nineteenth District Court on motion to dissolve the 
preliminary injunction restraining the defendant from laying down a rail- 
road track on California street from Battery to market, T. I. Bergin ap- 
pearing as counsel for plaintiff and Messrs. Code, Wilsori and Boyd for 
the defense.-^*°The Mission Woolen Mills intends to be an exhibitor at 
tbe forthcoming Paris Exposition. 

Wednesday, -30th. — J., B. Metcalf has been admitted to practice as 
an attorney-at-law in the United States Circuit Court.— ^California 
street, between Kearny and Powell, has been washed out to sueh an ex- 
tent by the recent rains as to delay for an indefinite period the putting on 
the oare of the California Street Wire Railroad Company. 

Thursday, 31st.— In compliance with % resolution of the Board of 
Supervisors, Mayor Bryant has Offered a reward of SSoOfor the arrest and 
conviction of the miscreant Who caused the delivery at ex- Supervisor 
Drucker's house of ft bottle containing o. mixture of gin and cyanide of 
potassium 1 . 

fVidfty, Feb. 1st — James Glazier accidentally shot himself in the 
foot yesterday morning while transferring his revolver to his overcoat 
pocket, preparatory to going home from Baldwin's Hotel. The wound is 
not dangerous.— Judge Wright has ordered that notice of the applica- 
tion of the Spring Valley Canal and Mining Company for dissolution be 
published for thirty days, in which time any person may file his objection 
to the application. 

TELEGRAPHIC. 

Monday, Jan, 28th. — The vote on Matthews' resolution establishes 
nothing certain as to the strength of Bland's bill, but it does show that 
some measure, providing for restricted remonetization in some form, will 
pass, and to that few object.— —The General Land Office, Saturday, 
issued a patent for the Kancho Moro y Cuyueas, comprising 8,845 acres, 
in San Luis Obispo county, James McKinley confirmee and patentee.— m 
Railroad matters of various kinds are occupying a large share of the at- 
tention of Congressional Committees at present, and the several rival lob- 
bies have already assembled in good force. 

Tuesday, 29th. —Washington, Jan. 29th, -^Thfi popular subscription 
to the 4 per cent, loan on Monday aggregated about $600,000. Eight 
banks were to-day designated as depositories, in addition to those already 
engaged in receiving deposits.— ^Chicago, Jan 29th.— The Times' Wash- 
ington special says : Secretary Sherman, in an interview, says the Silver 
bill will become a law. He is not, therefore, surprised at the course of 
the gold market. .Gold is quoted to-day in New York at 102£. 

Wednesday, 30th. — Chicago, Jan. 30th. — The Journal's Washing- 
ton special says : The National Republican intimates that there is a plan 
on foot to oust Secretary Sherman and put in Bristow, and that Halstead, 
of the Cincinnati Commercial, is engineering the matter.— A meeting of 
gentlemen interested in the formation of a Mining and Stock Exchange 
in this city was held yesterday. A permanent organization will be per- 
fected to-day.^— Washington, Jan. 30th. — The President has appointed 
John W. Mackey and W. S. Keys, of Nevada, Commissioners to the 
Paris Exposition. 

Thursday. 31st. — Washington, Jan. 31st.— Senor Zamacona, Special 
Agent of Mexico, yesterday paid the second installment of S300,000, on 
account of awards made by the Joint American and Mexican Commis- 
sion in favor of American citizens. —New Yobk, Jan. 3Lst. — A snow- 
storm has prevailed here since early morning. Communication by tele- 
graph with the South is -interrupted. 

Friday, Feb. 1st —Washington, Feb. 1st.— The Senate Committee 
on Railroads heard Colonel Gray, attorney for the Northern Pacific, to- 
day, in opposition to Senator Mitchell's bill concerning its land grants. 
— -^The population of the island of Old Providence appeal to the people 
of the United States for assistance, all their houses, provisions and crops 
having been destroyed by a hurricane.^— Tbe public debt statement for 
Januaay shows & decrease in the debt, for the month, of $1,068,000. 



FOREIGN. 

Monday, Jan. 28th. — St. Petersbdrgh, Jan. 28th.— The total Rus- 
sian losses in Europe to January 5th were 80,435 men.— London, Jan. 
28th. — The Post says : Marquis of Hartington, Liberal leader in the 
House of Commons, will refrain from taking immediately an adverse atti- 
tude towards the supplementary vote, as the government proposals de- 
serve consideration. ^—London, Jan. 28th. — After explanations with his 
colleagues, and the stopping of the fleet at Beska Bay, Lord Derby has 
withdrawn his resignation. 

Tuesday, Jan. 29th.— Paris, Jan. 29th,— The Academy of Sciences 
has awarded the Lolande prize of astronomy to Professor Hall, the Amer- 
ican discover of the satellites of Mars. —London, Jan. 29th. — United 
States bonds have fallen £ to 1| per cent.-^— London, Jan. 29th.— Safvet 
Pasha, Acting Foreign Minister, persists in his refusal to inform Layard, 
the British Embassador, of the terms of peace, showing the Porte is 
pledged to keep them secret.^— London, Jan. 29th. — Viscount Sandon, 
member of Parliament for Liverpool, will succeed Lord Carnarvon as Sec- 
retary pf Sta.fe for the Colonial Department. 

"Wednesday, Jan. 30th.— Bucharest, Jan. 30th.— General Ignatieff 
has arrived, with an autograph letter from the Czar to Prince Charles of 
Koumania. It is feared that the Czar refuses to abandon his claim to 
Eoumania and Bessarabia.— Rome, Jan. 30th. — The Pope is preparing 
an allocution against Russia for persecution of the church in Poland, and 



against King Humbert oil his accession to the throne for assumption of 
the title of King df Italy. 

Thursday, Jan. 31st — London, Jan. 31st. — A St. Petersburg cm-re- 
spondent telegraphed yesterday: " I can state positively that the Rus- 
sian government has received no intelligence of the Bigning of an armis- 
tice."-^~LoNDON, Jan. 31st. — It is said that a private telegram reports 
that peace negotiations have been broken off, and that the Turks will re- 
sist to the last. Foreign Embassadors are taking measures to protect 
Christians.— London, Jan. 31st. — A correspondent at Pera says: A 
council of war was held to-day, Wednesday. Hobart Pasha was present. 

Friday, Feb. 1st. — London, Feb. 1st. — The principal cause of the 
delay of the armistice is stated to be difficulty about the military condi- 
tions imposed. The Vienna papers say that these include the occupation 
uf Constantinople.— London, Feb. 1. — Italy is prepared to make an 
alliance with any powers to oppose Russian supremacy.— London, Feb. 
1. — A special from Rome says private telegrams of tendonbted authority 
say the Russians are within twenty-four hours march of Constantinople. 

STATEMCM' OF THE CAPITAL STOCK 

OF TUB 

SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 

A Corporation doing business at 
>"o. 610 Clay Street, San Francisco. 

Capital Stock, paid up in Gold Coin = .-; . ij; $500,000 00 

Reserve- Fund, paid-up- in Gold '-Coin 500,000 00 

8l.oo o,ooo 00 

SAVINGS AND-LOAN SOCIETY. 

By E. W. BUBB; President. 

OYKUd W. CARMANY, Cashier. 
State of California, City axd Coonty of "Sax "Francisco, ss.— E. W. Burr and 
Cyrus W. Carmany, 'being each separately and duly sworn, each for himself says: 
That said E. W. Burr is' President, and said Cyrus W. Carman y is Cashier of the 
Savings and Loan Society, the corporation above mentioned, and that the foregoing 
statement is true. E. W. BURR. 

CYRUS W. CARMANY. 
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 17tb day of January, 1873. 

(heal.] SAMUEL S. MUBFEY, Notary Public 

STATEMENT 

Of tbe Condition and Value of the Assets and Liabilities of the 
SAVINGS AND LOAN 'SOCIETY, 

A Corporation doing: business at No. 619 Clay street, in tbe City and County of Sau 
Francisco, State of California, and where said assets are situated. 
Dated December 29, 1S77. 

Assets. 

1— Promissory Notes and the Debts thereby secured by conveyances in 
trust of airtlijy first mortgages on Real Estate within this state, 
the actual value of which is $9,2S8,S95 64 

2 — Promissory Notes and the Dubts thereby secured by hypoth- 
ecation and transfer of bonds and shares of the Capital 
Stock of solvent corpora. ions in this State, the actual value of 

which is 1,519,554 39 

The condition of said Promissory Notes and Debts is as follows: 
Tbey are all existing contracts owned by said corporation, and 
payable to it at its place of business aforesaid, and the said Prom- 
issory Notes and the Securities therefor are kept and held by said 
Savings and Loan Society at its office, which is its principal place 
of business. 

3— Bonds and Evidences of Indebtedness of the City and County of 

San Francisco, the actual value of which is 313,706 00 

4 — Bonds of the United States and of the Counties and Cities of the 
State of California, and Certificates of Stock of solvent corpora- 
tions, the actual value of which is 653,283 11 

The condition of said Bonds and Certificates is as follows: They 
belong to said corporation, and are held and kept by it in its own 
vaults at its place of business. 

5 — Beal Estate situated iu the State of California, the actual value of 

which is 321,590 57 

The condition of said Beal Estate is: That it belongs to said 
corporation; the greater portion of it is productive, and includes 
the land and building in which said corporation has its office. 

6. — Amount due from other banks and New York correspondents 1,839 82 

7 — Cash, in United States Gold and Silver Coin, the actual value of 

which is 510,280 07 

Total .$12,614,149 60 

Liabilities. " 

1 —To Depositors said corporation owes deposits amounting to, and the 

actual value of which is §11,595,103 41 

The condition of said deposits is: That they are payable only 
out of eaid Assets, and are fully secured thereby. 

2— To Stockholders: The amount of guarantee capital, a permanent de- 
posit and reserve fund, the actual value of which is 1,000,000 00 

The condition of said liability to stockholders is: That no part 
of the amount can be paid to them, or in any way be withdrawn, 
except in payment of losses during the existence of the corpora- 
tion, nor until all Depositors shall have been paid in full the 
amount of their deposits and accrued dividends. 

3 — Beserved for Internal Bevenue tax, etc 19,041 19 

Total $12,614,149 60 

SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. ~~~~ 

By E. W. BUBB, President. 

CYBUS W. CABMANY, Cashier. 

State of California, > 

City and County of San Francisco. J ' 
E. W. BURR and CYBUS W. CARMANY, being each separately duly sworn, each 
for himself says: That said E. W. Burr is President, and that said Cyrus W. Car- 
many is Cashier of the Savings and Loan Society, the corporation above mentioned, 
and that the foregoing statement is true. E. W. BURR. 

CYBUS \V. CABMANY. 
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 17tb day of Januarv, A. D. 1878. 

[seal.] SAMUEL S. MUBFEY, Notary Public. 



POSTSCRIPT TO THE >\\ FRANCISCO NEWS LETfER. 



Feb. 2, 1878. 



RU33IAS DEMANDS UPON TURKET. 
B the fir»t publication 

i fr-'ni thr capitals of K . 

iil<l, at 
v Ruvian ant'H-m* | 

ining ->f 
■ 

the arti 

prodni- 

b< iu. in common with ntber Pom era, ho 

:«•• will Dot find it an any matter to w- 

: 'us aruv in its full carver toward the possession t>i I 

inoa the 
■ itwh.it surprising tliat tbi 
n Irwin n strength since the publii 
■il'l have supposed they would have seized upon the 
ant upon the disposition of their favorite bo 
In the debate on the supplementary \ 
«aid h* cmiKl ■■■ nothing In the term-; to justify an- attitude of 
ma to have been careful n.a to allads bo Rnssia'i atti- 
menace in advancing after the Porte haaaooeptod the terms. Lord 
licy of the Government to be "to secure, as far M p08< 
to Mahomedan8 and Christians." In the Com 
S'orthoote and Mr. Crosse both declared the adherence of the 
m-nt to the conditions of Lord Derby's May dispatch. Mr. 
listed bo the eisnificant fact that delay was caused not by the 
Tories bat by the Bassisas. He insisted on England's right tub 
in the final settlement, for which purpose the Government most be backed 
iate. It fa very evident that th? English do not believe in 
rositv to a fallen foe. The course of events in England and 
point to th" probability of some deep scheme masked by these 
ntly moderate terms, and which Lord Beaconsfield and fount An- 
drassy have seen through, and are preparing to unmask, If, as many 
have aM along believed, poosesaion |»ml aggrandisement have been the 
true object of the war, it will be hard upon the Czar to forego the prize 
that seems even now to be within his grasp; yet, to attain it, he must 
Eornpe, and play false to his promises of disinterestedness and his 
distinct disclaimer of all aggrandizement of territory. No Power in 
could have any object in preventing the autonomy of Bulgaria: 
but not one of them will look calmly on while Russia dictates terms fatal 
to the integrity and independence of the Ottoman empire. Whatever the 
final issue of the war may be, no one supposes that Turkey will be allowed 
to continue her old system of government over the Christian peasantry of 
the provinces, or that they will again be subject to the exactions of a 
Turkish Pasha. But it is by no means certain that they will be placed 
under the protection of the Czar, nor is it at all likely that their prospects 
would be bettered by any such arrangement. 
It has been asserted that Russia and Turkey will settle the Eastern 
ion between them, tliat in any case peace will be made upon terms 
that will exclude the possibility of English influence. We are asked to 
believe that under real or fancied encouragement from Germany the Czar 
is determined to break his solemn engagements made with the European 
Powers. The idea that any combination has been formed with a view to 
exclude any one of the signatories to the treaties from a final settlement 
of the Eastern question we regard as preposterous in the extreme. What- 
ever is to be the fate of Turkey, or the compensation to be granted to 
I for such efforts and sacrifices as she has made on behalf of the 
Christian subjects of the Porte, the signatories to the treaties of 185C 
and 1871 will never allow the Czar to conclude a separate Russo-Turkish 
peace ; each and all have an incontestable right to a voice in the final set- 
tlement. How far the Powers stand pledged to each other the following 
articles of the treaties signed in 1856 and again in 1871 will best explain. 
The first signed at Paris says : " The contracting parties engage, each on 
his side, to respect the independence and territorial integrity of the Ottoman 
Empire ; to guarantee in common the strict observance of this engage- 
ment, and consequently to consider any act of a nature to violate it as a 
question of general interest." At the conference held in London in 1871 
for a revision of a portion of this treaty, the following declaration was 
atrreed to and signed : " The plenipotentiaries of the North German 
Confederation, of Austro-Hungary, of Great Britain, Italy, Russia and 
Turkey, assembled together to-day in conference, recognize that it is an es- 
sential principle of the law of nations that no Power can release itself from 
the engagements of a treaty or modify its stipulations without the assent of 
the contracting parties by means of a friendly understanding." However 
anxious the Czar may be to exclude the influences of England and Aus- 
tria, who are the two most interested powers, from the final settlement, 
it is very certain that he will not succeed, nor is it at all likely that either 
of these Powers would contemplate with complacency any further aggran- 
dizement of Russian dominions, neither does any statesman for a moment 
suppose that any satisfactory or durable peace can be made without a 
Congress of the Great Powers of Europe. 



THE LATEST WAR TELEGRAMS. 
The latest press dispatches are of a warlike character. Evidently 
great anxiety and perplexity are felt by more than one European country. 
The secrecy insisted upon by Russia in regard to the terms of peace, has 
doubtless much to do with this state of affairs. It may be that when 
those terms come to be known the warlike clouds will disappear. Mean- 
while we can only give the telegrams for what they may prove to be 
worthy A special from Rome says: A private telegram of undoubted 
authority says the Russians are within twenty-four hours march of Con- 
stantinople. A Pera dispatch affirms that the Ministerial Council has de- 
termined to defend the city of Constantinople if it is attacked. The prin- 
cipal cause of the delay of the armistice is stated to be the difficulty 
about military conditions imposed. A Vienna paper says these include 
the occupation of Constantinople. Sir Stafford Northcote, Chancellor of 
the Exchequer, stated in the House of Commons yesterday afternoon, that 
Musuras Pasha, the Turkish Ambassador in London, had received a 
telegram from the Porte, saying that the general basis of armistice and 
peace were to be signed in Adrianople on Thursday. The Chancellor 
added that he did not know whether they were actually signed, nor the 
nature of the terms. Waddington, Minister of French Foreign Affairs, 



if apprised f ■ tola European 

proper repre- 

l'..lv hi prepared t-. make 

all a un> with The / in tn i r 

■ of il..- St, otc El 
burn..! the T .A other publications of pro-Russian tend 

di a in the Government 
■ u .-»( Uoyds, Several outdoor meetii 
the supplementary credit, were taken i 
■ion .<f by the adherents of the at, and turned into anti R 

1 Vienna correspondent lays: In oonaeonence of the 
extreme reticence of the Russian re ply, which makes no mention of special 

Austrian interests, Count. Andnssy now pro| tliat :i 

European Conference shall meet as Boon as possible at Vienna. The 
latest newa is that this idea is making progress. There is no telegraphic 
communication with Constantinople excep andria. 



bwta a wo the PACIFIC 



c 



A poetess sings: "'Tia years agones hot yet e'en now I feel his kisses 
on my brow." We suspect they were "burning kisses." Or perhaps he 
bit her." — Norrittovm Herald. 

SAUCELITO FERRY. 

Winter Arrangement.— On ami nrter November 5tb, 1877, 
.i swift and commodious steamer will leave as follows : 
Bis FEABCISOO, foot of Da%'is street : 8:45 a m., K. R. ; 10:45 a.m. ; 3:30 p.m. ; 5:00 
v.w . K. K. Sauchito: 8:00 A.M., It. It. ; 0:30 a.m. ; 1:00 r.M. ; 4:15 ML, It. It. 

Ktiiiiiay Time.— -San Francisco, foot of Davis street : 10:00 am.,R. R.; 12:00 
M. ; 2:00 p.lL ; 1:30 P.M. SAVCBLfTO : BlOO A.M. ; 11:00 A si. ; 1:00 P.M. ; 3:00 i M 
and 5:20 P.M., R. R. 

Un MONDAY an Extra Trip from from San Francisco at 7:00 A.M. 

LANDS for sale in lots to suit. Inqn're at the office of the Company, No. 320 San- 
Bome street, or of M. DORE & CO., Mo. 410 Pine street. 

Nov- 10- FRANCIS AVERY, Superintendent. 

OREGON STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

The Only Direct Mail Line to Portland, Oregon.— Reg-ulnr 
Steamers to PORTLAND from San Francisco every FIVE DAYS until further 
notice -Steamships GEORGE W. ELDER, CITY OF CHESTER, AJAX, and STATE 
OF OREGON (now building), connecting at Portland, Oregon, with Steamers and 
Railroads and their connecting Stage lines for all points in Oregon, Washington and 
Idaho Territories, British Columbia and Alaska. This Company has the exclusive 
right of selling Througb Tickets at Reduced Rates over the Oregon Central and Or- 
egon and California Railroads in Oregon, and EMIGRANTS to Oregon furnished with 
Certificates entitling tliem to travel at Half Rates over these roads. 

Caution.— This is the only line running NEW IRON STEAMSHIPS with every 
modern improvement for the comfort and safety of passengers. 

Nov. 3. K. VAN OTERENDORP, Agent, 210 Battery street. 

PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

Steamers or this Company will sail from Broadway Wharf 
for PORTLAND. Oregon), every 5 days, direct, and for LOS ANGELES, SANTA 
BARBARA, SANTA CRUZ, SAN DIEGO, SAN LUIS OBISPO and other NORTH- 
ERN and SOUTHERN COAST PORTS, leaving SAN FRANCISCO about every 
third day. 

For Day and Hour of Sailing, see the Company's Advertisement in the San Fran- 
cisco Daily Papers. 
{^~ Great Reduction in Rates of Fare to Portland, Oregon. 
Ticket Office, No. 214 Montgomery Street, ucar Pine. 
GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Agents, 
Dec. 22. No. 10 Market street. 

OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL STEAMSHIP COMPANY, 

For Japan and China, leave wharf, corner First and Bran- 
nan streets, at noon, for YOKOHAMA AND HONGKONG, connecting at 
Yokohama with Steamers for Shanghai. 

GAELIC Saturday, Feb. 16th. 

OCEANIC Tuesday, Dec. 18th, and Saturday, March 16th. 

BELGIC Tuesday, Jan. 22d, and Tuesday, April 16th. 

Cabin Plans on Exhibition,- and Passage Tickets for sale at No. 2 New Mont- 
gomery street. For Freight, apply at the Pacific Mail Steamship Company's Wharf. 
T. H. GOODMAN, General Passenger Agent. 
GEORGE H. BRADBURY, President. Jan. 19. 

IN CONSEQUENCE OF SPURIOUS IMITATIONS 

Of LEA A PERKINS' SAFCE, which are calculated to de- 
ceive the public, UEA AND PERKINS have adopted A NEW LABEL 
BEARING THEIR SIGNATURE, LEA & PERKINS, which is placed on every bottle 
of WORCESTERSHIRE SAUCE, and without which none isgenuine. 

Ask for LEA & PERKINS' Sauce, and see name on wrapper, label, bottle and stop- 
per. Wholesale and for export by the proprietors, Worcester ; Crosse & BlackweU, 
London, etc., etc., and by grocers and oilmen throughout the world. To be obtained of 
Dec. 1. MESSRS. CROSS & CO., San Francisco. 

ORLEANS HOTEL. 

This Hotel ha vine changed Its At nnAg-ement, Is now under 
the charge of the undersigned, formerly of the Auzerais House, San Jose, and 
having been thoroughly refurnished throughout, is now first-class in all its appoint- 
ments. The patronage of the public is respectfully solicited. 
Sacramento, September 6, 1877. [Sept. 22.] J. M. STAPLES. 



P 



QUICK8ILVER. 
or sale— In lots to salt, by Thomas Bell, Ho. 305 Sansome 

street, over Bank of California. Nov. 16. 



S' 



LEE DARNEAL CRAIG, 
accessor to Frank V. Scudder, Notary Public and Commis- 
sioner of Deeds, 611 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal. August 4 



S 



JOSEPH GIILOTTS STEEL FENS. 
old by nil stationers. Sole Agent for the (Jnltad States: 

MR. HENRY HOE, 91 John street, N. Y. Jan. 5. 



F 



MORRIS SPEYER, 
ire and Marine Insurance Agent, 307 California street. 

Dwelling, 507 Post street. January 1, 1S78. J.in. 12. 



POSTSCRIPT TO THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Feb. 2, 1878. 



Cradle. Altar, and Tomb. 



CRADLE. 

Austin— In this city, Jan. 28, to the wife of Captain M. A. Austin, a daughter. 
Agsew— In this city, Jan. 31, to the wife of Thomas Agnew, a son. 
Dahlbr— In this city, Jan. 25, to the wife of Captain H. Dabler, a daughter. 
Dedjbx— In this city, Jan. 25, to the wife of H. Dedjen, a daughter. 
Emerson— Li this city, Jan. 23, to the wife of Captain J. Lnierson, a son. 
FttBNCH —In this city, Jan. 27, to the wife of J. S. French, a son. 
Herman— In this city, Jan. 23, to the wife of B. Herman, a son. 
Leggb— In this city, Jan. 24, to the wife of James E. Legge, a son. 
Mbybr— In this city, Jan. 27, to the wife of M. Meyer, a daughter. 
MANIOK— In this city, Jan. 20, to the wife of J. Manion, a son. 
Ovbrstreet— In this city, Jan. 25, to the wife of W. F. Overstreet, a son. 
Perkins— In this city, Jan. 2S, to the wife of George C. Perkins, a daughter. 
ReIMER— In this city, Jan. 29, to the wife of John Keuner, a son. 
Stoddard— In this citv. .hnv 2J, to the wife or_ ; I Jl-^; ''hUii-iT ;i daughter. 

Uri -In this tto^he Mission Woolen Mills intends to be *m 

SllSfe^™ Exposition. • 

ky, -30th.— J., B. Metcalf ha* bteen adbaittefl t( 
at-law in the United States Circuit Court.— 

Amstutz-Aj/.-v. K— ni vnis city, Jan.'i'd," Henry Louis Amstutz to Louisa Arustutz. 

Aurens-Lawlkss— In thiscity, Jan. 24, Henry F. Ahrens to Mary A. Lawless. 

Adams-Lueiius— In this city, Jan. 27, John Adams to Maria Luehrs. 

Elaktston-Walcott— In this city, Jan. 30, Robert Elakiston to Lena Walcott. 

Cormax- Woodward— In this city, Jan. 30, Edward P. Corman to Emma L.Woodward. 

Clark-Jones— In this city, Jan. 31, James Clark to Frankie E. Jones. 

Ersiune-Street— In this city, Jau. 2G, Oakes R. Erskine to Annie Street. 

LDQciCu.yu-lvANDALb— lu this city, Jan 22, John H. Edgecomb to Mary A Randall. 

Hopkins-Mathews— In this city, Jan. 30, Charles H. Hopkins to Ruth Mathews. 

Hay-Matiiews— In this city, Jan. 3D, T. J. Hay to Florence A. Mathews. 

Homer-Clark— In this city, Jan. 30, William H. Homer to Sarah E. Clark. 

Laving-Hi.nkel- In this city, Jan. 28, John E. Laying to Louisa Hinkel. 

TOMB 

Adcocr— In this city, Jan. 30, Lottie L. Adcock, aged S mouths. 

bEiiA.M— In this city, Jan. 27, Alfred G. JBeham, aged 1 year 5 months and 27 days. 

Brown— In this city, Jan. 27, Bridget Anne Brown, aged 04 years. 

Chase— In this city, Jan. 25, Joseph T. Chase, aged 2 years 2 months and 3 days. 

Cody— In this city, Jan. 27, Mathy F. Cody, aged 1 year 9 months and 4 daj s. 

Elliott— In this "city, Jan. 27, Dr. Thomas W. Elliott, aged 65 years. 

Eaton— In this city, Jan. 24, Louis D. Eaton, aged 1 year and 10 months. 

Hanley— In this city, Jan. 2S, George Hanley, aged 14 years and 25 days. 

Latham— In tnis city, Jan. 2S, Phebe Bell Latham, aged 39 years and 4 months. 

Marden- In this city, Jan. 24, Wm. Lincoln Marden, aged 15 years. 

Park — In this city, Jan. 30, Mrs. Louisa Park, aged 45 years. 

Smith— In this city, Jan. 23. Theodore Smith, aged 36 years. 

Whitemarsii— lu this city, Jau. 29, Marietta Whitemarsh,aged 2 ys. 9 m. and 20dys 

HIGHEST STOCK QUOTATIONS FOE WEEK ENDING FEB. 1, 1318. 

Compiled by Hopkins & Macfarlank, 22S Montgomery St. 



Name of Mine. 



Argenta 

Andes 

* Alpha 

*Alta 

Alps 

* Bullion 

♦Belcher 

Best & Belcher. . 

Benton 

Eodie 

Cons Imperial. .. 

Crown Point 

Chollar 

California 

Con. Virginia. . . . 

Caledonia 

Confidence 

*De Frees 

Eureka Con 

Exchequer 

"Gould & Curry . 

Gila 

Grand Prize 

'Haleifc Norcross 
Julia 

* Justice 

Jackson 

Kentuck 

♦Leopard 

* Lady Wash'n . . . 

♦Leviathan 

Leeds 

^Mexican 

Modoc 

Manhattan 

Northern Belle . . 

Ophir 

Overman 

Raymond & Ely. 

Rye Patch 

♦Savage 

* Sierra Nevada . . 

Silver Hill 

Seg Belcher 

Solid Silver 

Succor 

Silver King, Ar'a 
Silv. King South 

Trojan 

♦Union Con 

♦Utah 

"* Yellow Jacket., 



Sat. Monday. Tuesday. Wednesdy Thuhsd'y. Friday. 
— s , *-— -s , ' ■ 

A.M. P.M, A.M. P M. A.M. P.M. A.M. P.M. A.M. P.M. 



10* 



14| 



10} 



13* 



in 



13 13J 
91 0i 



Hi 



133 



231 



111 



13& 



Gi 

12 
9 



3S| 



13| 

io3 



10J 



Assessments are now due on the Stocks above marked thus * 

Critics who are fond of saying that other men's lives are narrow, usu- 
ally have very narrow lives of their own. 



STATEMENT 

OF TnE CONDITION AND AFFAIRS OF THE 

STATE INVESTMENT AND INSURANCE 

OF SAN FRANCISCO, 



CO., 



Iii tbe State of California, on the 31st day of December, 
A.D. 1S77, and for the year ending on that day, as made to the Insurance Com- 
missioner of the State of California, pursuant to the provisions of Sections 610 and 
Oil of the Political Code, condensed as per blank furnished by the Commissioner. 

Capital, 9200,000. 

Amount of Capital Stock paid up in Cash §200,000 00 

Assets. 

Real estate owned by Company ' $136,750 96 

Loans on bond and mortgage ».. BS,£-65 33 

Cash market value of all stocks and bonds owned by Company.. 83,070 00- 

Amount of loans secured by pledge of bonds, stocks and other marketable 

securities as collateral ; 26,63; J . 0.1 

Cash in Company's office ., 8,002 05 

Cash in Anglo-Calif orniau Bank 13,550 50 

Cash in First National Gold Bank 11,481 50 

Cash in Farmers' and Merchants' Bank of Los Angeles 2,242 99 

Cash in Capital Savings Bank, Sacramento 2.2C0 13 

Interest due and accrued on all stocks and loans 3,207 0J 

Interest due and accrued on bonds and mortgages 2,133 13; 

Premiums in due course of collection 44.23S 25 

Bills receivable, not matured, taken for Fire and Marine- Risks 21,008 35 

Office Furniture and Property Account, city and country v . 8,138 64 

Total assets $421,871 SO 

Stabilities. 

Losses adjusted and unpaid (not due) $4,921 60 

Losses in process of adjustment or in suspense 5,800 00. 

Gross premiums on fire risks ruuning one year or less, $221,130 20, rein- 
surance 50 percent 110,565 10 

Gross premiums on fire risks running more than one year, $2,846 76, rein- 
surance pro rata 1,808 40 

Gross premiums on marine and inland navigation risks, ?2,36fl 77, rein- 
surance inO percent 2,366 77 

Gross premiums on marine time risks, $37,705 93, reinsurance 50 per cent. 18,852 96 

Cash dividends declared to stockholders, remaining unpaid 126' 00- 

Marine notes payable 2.515 20 

Claim in litigation 972 00 

Total liabilities 5147,998 03 

Income. 

Net cash actually received for fire premiums $208,957 51 

Net cash actually received for marine premiums 58,090 69 

Bills and notes received for premiums. 21,068 35 

Received for interest on bonds and mortgages 4,167 85 

Received for interest and dividends on bonds, stocks, loans and from all 

other sources 8.0S1 46 

Rents 12,420 00 



Total income $312,794 46 

Expenditures. 

Net amount paid for fire losses (inc'udinir $13,500 losses of previous years). $90,324 00 
Net amount paid for marine losses (including $11,939 Sb" losses of previous 

53, 



years . , 



Dividends to stockholders 

Paid or allowed for commissions or brokerage 37, 

Paid for salaries, fees and other charges for officers, clerks, etc 30, 

Paid for State, national and local taxes, rent, Fire Patrol, advertising-, 
printing, discount on silver, and all other expenses 26,924 48 



439 12 

.S74 00 
033 90 
145 00 



Total expenditures.. 



Incurred during the year $82,352 70 

Risks and Premiums. 



Marine. 
$46,692 25 



Net amount of Risks written dur- 
ing the year $15,707,076 

Net amount of Risks expired 
during the year 16,301,966 

Net amount iu force Decern 
ber 31, 1S77 j 14,404,467 

Risks written in State of Cali- 
fornia I 14,133,795 



Fire Risks. 



Premiums. 


$244,S70 19 


257,102 IS 


223,970 96 


202,842 67 



Marine 
Risks. 



$1,370,277 

1,488,619 

475,592 

1,370,277 



Premiums. 



$79,909 50 
86,095 85 
40,072 70 

79,909 50 



A. J. BRYANT, President. 
CHAS. H. GUSHING, Secretary. 
Office 218 and 220 Sansome street, in Company's building. 



TTW 



PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 
e Company's steamers will sail as follows at 12 M.: 

CITY OF TOKIO, February 5th, for YOKOHAMA and HONGKONG. 

GRANADA, February 5th, for PANAMA and NEW YORK, calling at MAZATLAN, 
MANZANILLO, SAN BLAS and ACAPULCO. Hereafter the Panama Steamers will 
leave on the 5th and 19th of exch month. Tickets to and from Europe by any line 
for sale at the lowest rates. 

SOUTH CAROLINA, Fehruary7tb, for ACAPULCO and ail ports south of AcapulW. 



or on arrival of the English 
:?10 additional is charged &ffi? 



AUSTRALIA, February ISth, at 12 o'clock, M., 
mails, for HONOLULU, AUCKLAND and SYDNEY. 
passage in Upper Saloon. 

CITY OF PANAMA, February 9th. for VICTORIA, PORT TOWNSEND, SEAT- 
TLE, ar.d TAG t 'MA, connecting at TACOMA with Northern Pacific Railroad for 
PORTLAND, Oregon. Tickets must be purchased before 11 a.m. on day of sailing, 
at 222 Montgomery street, or at Wharf Office. For freight or passage apply at the 
office, corner of First and Bramian streets. 

Feb. 2. WILLIAMS, BLANCHARD & CO., Agents. 

JOHN ROACH, 

Mathematical Instrument Maker. 4*29 Montgomery street, 
S. W. corner Sacrameuto, San Francisco. Instruments made to order, re- 
I paired and carefully adjusted. August 25. 



The Special Organ of "Marriott's Aeroplane Navigation Co."--Fred. Marriott, Patentee. 



Prioe per Copy, 10 Caate.1 



ESTABLISHED JULY, SO. 18A6. 



[Annual Subaoriptlon. M. 







ITI1 







%\%%&%. 



DEVOTED TO THE LEADING INTERESTS OF CALIFORNIA AND THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Vol. 28. 



SAN FEAN0IS00, SATURDAY, FEB. 9, 1878. 



No. 3. 



Office of the Ann Francisco News Letter, Merchant Street, 

No*. 607 to 615, San Fran> ; 

GOLD BARS— 890@910— Silver Bars— 0@15 f cent. disc. Treasury 
Notes are selling at 98$. Buying, 08. Mexican Dollars, 5i@6 
per cent. disc. Trade Dollars, 4@.4J per cent. 
jW Exchange on New York, \ per cent, for Gold ; Currency, 1} per 

cent, premium. On London, Bankers, 4iUd.@ ; Commercial, 

49Jd.(£o0d. Paris, 5 franca per dollar. Telegrams, 65-100®^ per cent. 
0* Latest price of Gold at New York, Feb. 8, at 3 P.M., 102. Latest 
price of Sterling, 482j @48*j. 

tS~ Price of Money here, f@l per cent, per month — bank rate. In the 
open market, 1@1£. Demand active. 

PRICES OF LEADING STOCKS AND GOVERNMENT BONDS. 
Sax Francisco February 8, 1878. 



Stacks and Bonds. 
U. S. Bonds, 5-20s 1867-6S 

Legal Tender Notes 

S. P. Citv & Co. B'ds, 6s, '5S 

S. F. City Bonds, 7s 

Sacramento City Bonds 

Tuba County Bonds, 8s 

San Mateo Co. Bonds, 7s. .. 

S. F. Gas Light Co 

National G. B'k & Trust Co. 
Spring Valley Water Co. . . . 



Bid. 


Ashed 


104 


105 


93 


9SJ 


102 


101 


105 


108 


26 


23 


97 


— 


100 


— 


94J 


05 


77i 


SO 


91 


92 



Stacks and Bonds. 

Omnibus Railroad Co 

Central Railroad Co 

N. B. and Mission R. R. Co. 
Front St., M. & O. R. R. Co. 
Fireman's Fund Ins. Co. . . . 

Union Insurance Co 

Pacific Bank 

The Bank of California 

Central Pacific Railroad.. . . 



Bid. 
30 
70 
70 
22 
95 
108 
110 
91 



Asked 

S3 

75 

72J 

25 
100 
112 
115 

95 

85 



THE STOCK MARKET. 
Another "week has passed and the same dullness prevails at the 
Boards that has characterized the business for the last six weeks. Out- 
side of Ophir and the " bonanzas," and a few of the other leading stocks, 
everything is stagnated, and dealers have of necessity withdrawn from 
the market almost entirely. The declaration of $2 dividends upon Con. 
Virginia and California was promptly announced, but had no perceptible 
influence or the stock, the shares going at about the same quotation. Eu- 
reka Con. is about the only stock that shows an advance, which is occa- 
sioned by heavy purchases for Eastern account. The mine looks well at 
all points, and promises a continuation of the present dividends for some 
time, at least. Ophir is now regarded as the great gamble, but under 
the existing apathy in the market, operators are very timid about hand- 
ling such high-priced stock, and calmly await developments. On account 
of the excessive heat in the main south drift, work has been necessarily 
delayed, but everything is now being pushed ahead to make the air con- 
nections, to obtain the much-needed ventilation. Cross-cutting will be 
started in about two weeks (not before), and until then we may not look 
for any particular advance in the stock. Considerable dissatisfaction is 
expressed because the bonanza people are persistently keeping back the 
market, when the public are ready and clamorous to invest; but as the 
policy of the management is to make a market purely upon development, 
the public may rest themselves easy and abide their time. The same 
general depression was not'ceable at the close, and aside from a slight de- 
mand for Ophir, the market was comparatively unchanged. 



ASSAYS FROM THE AZTEC SYNDICATE'S MINES. 

Ascertained results from the Aztec Syndicate's mines of Arizona are 
to hand, and justify the predictions previously made by our best experts. 
Some time since we mentioned that Mr. Waterman of Chicago, and Mr. 
G-. R. Gibson of this city, had left for Arizona, for the purpose of ex- 
amining the property of the Aztec Syndicate in the Santa Rita mountains. 
These gentlemen returned on Sunday hist, and express themselves satis- 
fied of the vast wealth of that region in general, and of the Aztec Syn- 
dicate's property in particular. The following assays of ore, obtained by 
themselves from shafts and locations, were made by Professor W. T. 
Rickard, F. li. S. C, resident metallurgist and chemist of the Aztec Syn- 
dicate: Jefferson shaft— ©62 83 silver, 46 per cent lead, per ton; second 
assay, 8122 51. Aztec croppings, 862 83; Aztec shaft, three assays — 
$628 35, $785 41, §100 06. Inca cutting, four assays s::7ii 72. SlSii 64, 
$62 83, $26 70. Iturbide (shaft just commenced), two assays— $58 11, 
$431 96. Almoner, $103 67. Average assays of the dump at Toltec 
camp, about 150 tons, 6221 48. The visitors brought with them duplicate 
specimens of the rock from which these assays were obtained, and will 
take them to Chicago and St. Louis for assay there. The result of these 
visits will undoubtedly he beneficial in turning capital into the Santa Rita 
and neighboring districts. 



Published with this week's issue a Four- 
Page Postscrifrt. 



LATEST ATOMS OF NEWS OF FACT AND THOUGHT. 



THE LATEST WAR TELEGRAMS. 
London, Feb. 8th, 6 P. M.--In the House of Commons this afternoon, 
Sir Stafford Northcote, Chancellor of the Exchequer, communicated a 
summary of the terms of the armistice. He said they disclose such a 
state of affairs that the Government, in view of the possible disturbance 
in Constantinople, has ordered a portion of the English fleet thither, not 
as a departure from neutrality, but as protection of life and property. 
The Government has given notice of this step to the other Powers, asking 
whether they will join in the movement. It has also notified Russia,, 

( London, Feb. 8th, 7 P. m. — In the House of Lords Lord Derby, For- 
eign Secretary, made a statement similar to that of Sir Stafford Nothcote 
in the House. He said he was justified in his resignation when the fleet 
was first sent to Constantinople, but he says he approved the present 
action in consequence of the altered aspect of affairs. In the House of 
Commons Sir Stafford Northcote's announcement was received with deaf- 
ening cheers. 

There appeared in our last number among the " Lies of the Day," an 
item in which the name of our esteemed ex-Governor Pacheco was men- 
tioned. Nothing could have given us greater pain than the smuggling 
into the columns of the News Letter this inexcusable fling at the ex- 
Governor by some one, who must have a personal pique to gratify. 
How it could have escaped attention and gotten into the paper is 
a mystery beyond our comprehension. We offer our most sincere apology 
to all concerned for this unkind and inexcusable wrong, although to us 
unknown at the time of its commitment; and it is as sincerely deprecated 
by us as by the parties attempted to be injured. 

The experts who visited Wickenberg, some days ago, have returned, 
and report that the Vulture mine is a most valuable property. Mr. P. 
T. Nougues remains in Arizona for the present, to keep matters in good 
shape there, and his associates in this city are reported to have interested 
a large amount of capital in the property. ^— We hear of other proposed 
investments of capital in the southern section of the Territory.^— Capt. 
Gains, Superintendent of the Silver King North, is expected to visit this 
city in a few days. __ 

III health alone has induced Milton S. Latham, Esq. to retire from 
the Presidency of the London and San Francisco Bank. He will shortly 
proceed to New York, and thence to London, where, under the scientific 
and popular treatment of Sir Henry Thompson, his health, we earnestly 
trust, will be permanently restored, and that his strength will be so far 
recovered that he will be enabled to enjoy the wonders of the forthcom- 
ing Paris Exhibition of 1878. 

The following firms in London are authorized to receive subscrip- 
tions and advertisements for the San Francisco News Letter: W. H. 
Smith & Sons, 186 Strand, W.C.; George Street & Co., 30Cornhill, EC.; 
F. Algar, 8 Clement's Lane, E.C.; American Exchange and Reading 
Rooms, 440 Charing Cross, W.C.; Delizy, Davies & Co., 1 Cecil street, 
Strand, W.C. Foreign Subscriptions, 25 shillings per annum 

" While the husband unlawfully abandons the wife without cause, 
the Court may in its discretion require him to pay any money necessary 
for the support of herself or of her children." Such is the brief amend- 
ment to the Codes introduced by Mr. Johnson. We should be astonished 
if one vote were recorded against its passage. 

We would draw attention* to the article on "United States and 
Mexico," by our old friend, Ellis Reid, and trust that Mr. Foster's visit to 
Washington will settle all differences between the sister republics by an 
immediate recognition of President Diaz. 



In another column will be found the official statement of the con- 
dition and affairs of the State Investment and Insurance Company of San 
Francisco. The institution is in a sound and healthy condition, as the 
statement abundantly proves. 

How strange it seems, after the Christian Church has been denied 
the occupation for 400 years of Sophia, we now see the Roman Pontiff 
depart, and the head of "the Greek Church enters Constantinople. 



Printed and Published by the Proprietor, Frederick Marriott, 607 to 61o Merchant Street, San Francisco, California. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Feb. 9, 1878. 



BENEATH HER WINDOW. 
Maiden, down the moonlit vines In its mossy hollows torn 
Let thy whisper softly creep, 
Sweet 



, r , ...._ , ....,, As the goddess, half afraid, 

midnight's breath of pines, Fled across the moony glade._ 



Wast thou queen of Plato's isle, 
Lapt in summer's endless smile ? 
All the training of a queen 
Lingers yet in step and mien ? 
And the graceful, tingling beech 
Wavers in your airy speech ; 
And your motions, quickly, slowly, 
Are the woodland naiad's wholly. 



Maiden of unwhispered lore, 
Hast thou never loved before ? 
Did no former ages fold 
Lover's kiss and rapture bold ? 
Then you have not sounded clearly 
All the age's essence nearly. 
Yet thou seem'st a simple woman, 
Warm and mortal, bright and hu- 
man ; 
Let a dewy rosebud slide, 
And the starlit night divide, 



Pure as lilies grouped asleep. 

All the fervors of the deep 

Yearn and falter in my soul ; 

The revealing, secret things, 

Buried under Memphian wings, 

Move me with a weird control. 

All of dreamland hidden lies 

In the rapture of thine eyes ; 

And what olden empires fret 

Ceaseless chords of memory, 

Or what happy ripples wet 

Thy rich garments, by the sea, 

In some cloudland, wide and free, 

Is not whispered, is not said, 

By the wise stars overhead. 

Dost remember when the beech 

Round thy perfect limbs did reach 

Ere thy days of human speech ? 

Ah! I doubt not Dian's kiss, 

When the fair youth dreamed of Then my soul will understand 

Just a flicker in the shade [bliss, You forget the cloudy land, 

Of your modest branches made ; And your olden spells resign 

And your head the crimpled fern For the sake of love divine. 

— Charles H. Shinn, in Atlantic Monthly. 

A TREASURE-SEEKING EXPEDITION. 

The American expedition for the recovery of the lost treasure of the 
San Pedro Alcantara^ which was noticed a few weeks since, has now been 
carried to such an advanced stage of preparation that a deflnite day for 
sailing has been set. It being the desire of the projectors of the enter- 
prise to avoid, as far as possible, the annoyance of crowds of sightseers, 
curiosity-hunters, and applicants for employment, it was not deemed ad- 
visable to state where, at or near New York, their preparations were mak- 
ing. The facts which can be given are, however, of unusual interest. 
The vessel purchased for the uses of the expedition is the schooner Peter 
Mitchell. She is of about 100 tons, and sailors tell marvelous stories of 
her swiftness and seaworthiness. The Canadian Government had her con- 
structed for the purpose of chasing intrusive Yankee fishing smacks away 
from the Dominion waters, and it was said that she was " able to overhaul 
anything that floated and went by wind." In the days of that service 
she carried guns, and was as bright and pretty a thing as a sailor would 
desire to see. When she was no longer required to drive off fishermen, 
she was sold to parties who put her into the West India fruit trade — a 
traffic for which she was especially fitted by her speed, and, after a short 
term in that service, she was purchased for her present use. She has two 
cabins, one for Captain T. H. Folingsby, commandant of the expedition, 
his clerk, the "Venezuelan officer, who will go aboard at Laguayra, and an- 
other gentleman ; the other aft for the sailing master, mate, and engineer. 
The forecastle will accommodate twelve men. 

The principal delay in getting ready has been caused by the difficulties 
encountered in procuring suitable dredges. Those in ordinary use on mud- 
scows are useless for working at such a depth as the operations about the 
San Pedro Alcantara will require, and are in other respects unsuited for 
this service. Consequently others, the invention of Captain Folingsby, 
models of simplicity and effectiveness, have had to be built. The weight 
of each dredge is only half-a-ton, and it is capable of bringing up easily 
two tons of material. Two of these powerful machines will be taken, but 
only one will be operated at a time. Each lift of the dredge will be made 
in four or five minutes, and will clear a space of at least twenty square 
feet. When operations are begun, the Peter Mitchell will be steadied in 
place by four anchors. Her course and the ground she has gone over will 
be carefully marked out by buoys, of which twenty, painted in different 
colors and numbers, are provided. A submarine armor-suit, air-pump, 
and tubing, will be taken among the many things provided to meet possi- 
ble contingencies, and Captain Folingsby, should occasion arise, will be 
quite competent to visit the bottom of the sea, as he is an experienced di- 
ver, but he does not anticipate those things ever being required. For the 
work of recovering the treasure, his appliances for submarine work from 
the vessel's deck are infinitely more effective than any diver's labors could 
be, and for purposes of exploration of the bottom, his inventive genius 
has provided something which he is confident will supersede the divers' 
slow and limited gropings. Captain Folingsby has had a "submarine 
telescope" constructed, 9in. in diameter at the largest end, and 24ft. long. 
Its tubes are of heavy tin, its joints are closely packed with wicking, and 
its object-glass is plain French plate, very heavy. Closed together it stands 
a little over 4 ft. high, and weighs about 40 pounds. Weights may be 
slung to its lower end to keep it down, if necessary, and lines, rigged 
through stationary loops, on the slides, will enable the person using it to 
shorten or lengthen it at pleasure. With this glass Captain Folingsby 
says he will be able to see the smallest pebbles or coin on the bottom of 
the ocean at a depth of 60 or 70 feet, as plainly as if they were upon the 
deck of the Peter Mitchell. Fortunately, the wreck of the San Pedro Al- 
cantara lies in an entirely land-locked position, where there are never any 
storms or rough waves to interfere with work. From the middle of the 
forenoon until four or five o'clock daily there is a pleasant breeze, but the 
mornings and evenings are so calm than.there is scarcely a ripple on the 
water, which is clear as crystal and covers a bed of shining white sand. 
Conditions more favorable for the development of the highest usefulness 
of the captain's submarine telescope could scarcely be imagined. It is ex- 
pected the Peter Mitchell will, with favorable winds, sail to Laguayra in 
ten or twelve days. There the officer appointed by the Venezuelan Gov- 
ernment to observe the dredging operations and take the royalty of 5 per 
cent, on the treasure recovered will be taken up, The present Adminis- 
tration of Venezuela has shown a most kindly disposition to encourage 
Captain Folingsby's enterprise, giving him an exclusive right to work for 
the recovery of the lost S6\000,000 of the San Pedro Alcantara during a 
term of six years, in consideration of the royalty stated. The Folingsby 
Expedition will be at work raking up the long-lost Spanish dollars, it is 
hoped, by the 18th inst. — Globe. 

Snoring is now politely described as indulging in sheet music. 



T 



lice, 



A RARE CHANCE. 

TO LEASE FOR A NCMBER OF TEARS, 
be World -Renowned ami magnificent Three-story E/'li- 

THE HONGKONG HOTEL, Hongkong:. 

This spacious and commodious hotel is situated in the very heart of the business 
part of the town, near the PRAY A, and in full view of the landing places of all the 
mail and coasting steamers. The building has every 

MODERN IMPROVEMENT, 

and all the conveniences, an elegant bar, billiard rooms, reading rooms and a DINING 
HALL, which will accommodate 
TWO IIVXDKEO PERSONS, ETC., ETC. 
For photographic views, plans and further particulars, apply to 

DEGENER & CO., 
Jan. 39.] 319 California St. 

Tenders for Transmission to Hongkong- received at our of- 
fice until February 15th, 1STS. 

1,000 SHARES OF STOCK IN THE PH(ENIX GOLD MINE FOR SALE. 

The Mine Is locatefl in Amador county, Cal., on the great 
mother lode, near the old and famous Amador and Keystone mines ; has an 80 
Stamp Mill, Splendid Water Power, Canal and Timber Privileges, a 40-foot Ledge — 
explored to 1,100 feet in depth ; has paid over 1 per cent, per month on par the- past 
year, and with present developments should pay 2 per cent, hereafter for many 
years. The Mine has no debt. Capital Stock, 10,000 shares of S100 each, and the 
proprietor,' Mr. A. Hay ward, now offers 1,000 shares at par, with the option (to orig- 
inal purchasers and not transferable) of returning their stock to him, on ninety days 
notice— at the expiration of six months— at cost, and 10 per cent, per annum interest, 
less dividends declared. Merchants' Exchange Bank Stock taken at S75 per share. 
Nov. 17.] Apply R. G. SNEATH, Agent, 423 California street. 

NOW READY I 

HINTON'S NEW MAP OF ARIZONA. 

Invaluable for the traveler, prospector and miuer. Con- 
tains all the latest mining districts, locations, U. S. Surveys, etc. Price lower 
than other maps. 

Colored, on rollers §2 50. J Do. for pocket, in covers SI 50. 

NEARLY READY, 
Million's Ilautl'Book of Arizona! 

Four hundred pages, three new maps, seventy illustrations. Orders received by 
the publishers. PAYOT, UPHAM &CO., San Francisco, 

Jan. 12. AMERICAN NEWS CO., New York. 

REMOVED. 

The Old Established Steam Gas Fitting: and Plumbing-. Es- 
tablishment of J. K. PRIOR has been removed from 730 Montgomery street to 
his new five-story-and-a-basement building, NO. 1128 MARKET STREET and 21 
TURK STREET, where a complete assortment of new patterns of Gas Fixtures and 
Plumbing Material are offered at greatly reduced rates. Messages sent by American 
District Telegraph Company free. All jobbing promptly attended to. Established 
1852. [July 28.] J. K. PRIOR. 

$250 REWARD. 

Mayor's Office, San Francisco, January 30, 1S78.--A reivarrt 
of $250 is hereby offered for any information furnished to the Chief of Police 
which will lead to the arrest and conviction of the person or persons who caused to 
be delivered at the house of August Drucker, Esq., ex-Supervisor of the First Ward, 
a package containing a mixture of gin and cyanide of potassium. 
Feb. 2. A. J. BRYANT, Mayor of the City and County of S. F. 

PARTNER WANTED. 

A gentleman, with jrood connections abroad, is desirous of 
forming a partnership with another gentleman having the command of cap- 
ital, and of good social standing, with the view of establishing a foreign and local 
business of importance. A thorough knowledge of the resources of the State, agri- 
cultural and mineral, is indispensable. 
Jan. 19. Address, P. O. Box 1530, San Francisco. 

MME. B. ZEITSKA'S INSTITUTE, 922 POST STREET. 

French, German and English Day and Boarding; School for 
Young Ladies. — The next term will commence January 3, 1878. Kindergarten 
connected with the Institute. For particulars, address 
Jan. 5. MME. B. ZEITSKA, Principal. 

$10 TO S25 A DAY 

Sure made by Agents selling- our Chromos, Crayons, and 
Reward, Motto, Scripture Text, Transparent, Picture and Chromo Cards. 100 
samples, worth $4, sent postpaid for 75 cents. Illustrated catalogue free. J. H. 
BUFFORD'S SONS, Boston. Established 1830. August 18. 

THOMAS DAY, 

Importer of every variety of Gas Fixtures, Crystal, Gilt, 
Steel and Bronze, and a full assortment of Marble and Bronze Clocks and fine 
Bronzes; also a full line of Plumbers' Goods. 122 and 124 Sutter Street, San Fran- 
cisco. ___________^___ Jan. 27. 

$400,000 TO LOAN 

On City and Country Real Estate. $350, OOO to loan on Gas, 
Water, Bank, Railroad and other securities. Mercantile Paper discounted and 
money loaned upon all kindB of collateral security. 
August 18. JOHN T. LITTLE, 412 Montgomery street. 

SILVER KING NORTH MINING COMPANY, 

Pinal County, Arizona. 

Office : Room 36, Xo. 330 Fine St. (Academy Building), s. F. 

• [August IS. J 

COKE CHEAPEST FUEL. 

Reduction in Price: Wholesale Price, 50 cents per barrel; 
Retail Price, 60 cents per barrel, at the works of the SAN FRANCISCO GAS- 
LIGHT COMPANY, Howard and First streets, and foot of Second st. Jan. 12. 

FRANK KENNEDY, 

Law Office, 004 Merchant Street. —Probate, Divorce, Bank- 
ruptcy, and other cases attended to. Rents, and all other demands, collected. 
Bad tenants ousted. Charge taken of real estate for residents, or absentees. Charges 
very reasonable. Jan. 12. 

JOHN ROACH, 

Mathematical Instrument Maker, 429 Montgomery street, 
S. \V. corner Sacramento, San Francisco. Instruments made to order, re- 
paired and carefully adjusted. August 25. 



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CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



B 



WHAT DOBS IT MATTER? 

What (low it matter, 

n '-iiirt %n gathered all ; 

Or ' ioiU fall ; 

What does it matter! If I sooner k'' 1 . 

Wfl urinfl - ~ "ii my l>reiwt, 

With live]. 1 wain*, the reapers, tirnl And slow, 
Will niching pan tin/ grasses o'er my rtst, 
huur, drop ;i tear 
Wlmt will it matter, dear? 

What will it matter, sweet, if T grow nl.l. 

And Sunmi"'!-'-' pleasant Baku grow bleak anil bare ; 
A law briaf daya "f wiiwhiiw or of cold, 

A few short hours of pleasure oroi care? 
What will it matter if I wearier stay 

To reap the fruitage of the sober Fall, 
To put the sarttar gathered flowers b»w» ; 

What is the gain or loafl if. after all, 

A little longer story my feet — 
What will it matter, sweet? 

What matters it. dear heart, if, far or near. 

Waits the Death Angel noiselessly and dumb; 
For, if I stay, love fetters bind me h 

And, if I j". dear voices whisper Come! 
Though dark and thick the shadows intervene, 

The clouds are sometimes rifted, and I see 
The beautiful dim vale that lies between 

The world which is and that which is to be — 
Only a step apart— 
What matters it, dear heart? 



PROGRESS OF THE TELEPHONE. 
The diacoveriea made in connection with the telephone are increasing 
in number daily, and the army of experimenters must now be counted by 
■ils: but perhaps the most curious announcement yet made comes 
from Titusville, Pennsylvania, where the discovery was made, as is al- 
leged, that the telephone will transmit audible speech if applied to any 
part of the body— that is, it is not necessary to speak into the instrument, 
but merely to apply it to the chest or the head while speaking, and the 
sound will be reproduced by the electric undulations set up in the wire. 
The articulations are fainter when sent in that manner, but are still quite 
distinct, especially if you know what to listen for ; but it is thought that 
the discovery shows how to increase the volume of sound, viz., by con- 
necting several telephones to one wire. The original idea of receiving a 
speech by telephone in as many places as were connected by wires with 
the instrument spoken into by the speaker has thus a probability of being 
carried out in practice. It would not be pleasant either for the orator or 
his audience if it were necessary to hold the telephone in front of the 
mouth while speaking ; but if the instrument can be put in the pocket or 
placed against the chest, the difficulty will be successfully avoided. It 
would be as well, however, to take the statement with a large grain of 
salt. If it is true that the principle of the telephone was so well under- 
stood in this country, as some recent lecturers endeavor to prove, it is 
singular that hitherto no improvement upon Professor Bell's instrument 
has been introduced here. Professor Sacher, of Salzburg, has discovered 
a method of utilizing the telephone to " tap " telegraph wires — that is, to 
extract the messages passing over the wires ; and if that should prove to 
be a fact, it will become more than ever necessary to put the telegraph 
wires under-ground, or in some position where they cannot easily be 
reached. As the majority of signals are, however, Bent by either the 
needle instrument or the Morse sounder, an educated and delicate ear 
would be necessary to translate the signals of the latter in the telephone, 
while the former, depending on the mere swinging of the needle from 
side to side, would simply be repeated in the telephone as so many waves 
utterly unintelligible. A far more important step has been made in the 
discovery of a means of insulating the telephone wire from the ordinary 
telegraph wires. It will be remembered that in the experiments made 
during the meeting of the British Association, the telephone signals could 
not be heard at times, owing to the incessant " patter " produced by the 
signals pa.sing along the wires used for the regular telegraphic business ; 
and if that difficulty can be avoided by any simple means, the telephone 
can be used at once without laying down special lines. The talking ma- 
chine, or phonograph, is also being rapidly developed, for we hear that 
Mr. Edison has constructed one of so powerful a character that it not 
only speaks with perfect clearness, but so loudly that it can be heard at a 
distance of 175 feet. Some erroneous nations of the telephone have ob- 
tained circulation, notably that which is employed to prove that the tele- 
phone cannot be new because two pill-boxes, connected by a string, can 
be made to transmit sound. In that case the sound is conveyed by me- 
chanical vibrations, and slackness in the string or anything which im- 
fedes its motion — such as turning a corner — effectually stops the message, 
n the electric telephone, on the contrary, the sound is not conveyed at 
all, but is reproduced by electric undulations, and the wire may turn as 
many corners, or be as slack as may be necessary, without affecting the 
efficiency of the instrument. 

The Telephone has been presented at Court. Recently Professor 
Bell and Colonel Reynolds attended at Osborne, and explained the tel- 
ephone t<i Her Majesty and the E&yal circle, and a communication was 
established with Sir Thomas and Lady Biddulph at Osborne Cottage, 
where Miss Field sang "Kathleen Mavourneen," and received Her 
Majesty's thanks, telephonically, through the Duke of Connaught. Thus 
encored, Miss Field sang the " Cuckoo Song " and " Comin' through the 
Rye," and recited the epilogue in As Yott Like It, and although the sounds 
did not come through the rye, the Royal circle liked to talk with Osborne 
Cottage. Ambition, ever at work, extended the experiment to the South- 
ampton Post-office, whence Mr. Preece, the Postmaster, no doubt answered 
his chief, Lord John Manners, who was at Osborne ; and Major Webber, 
leading a tonic sol-fa quartette, also talked with the Duke of Connaught. 
A bugle sounded the retreat at midnight with startling distinctness, and 
finally from London came the tones from the pealing organ swelling the 
note of praise. All this is very well, but we hope that we may argue 
from the presence of the Duke of Richmond and Lord John Manners 



that the Privy Oounofl and the P. wt office iu-o their way to the practical 
the Telephone, n t it will bo to hold a Privy Ooun< 

oil at Osborne or Balmoral^and oommunioate daring the very pi 
with Whitehall ! Or when Bar Majesty's First Minister deal 

BUlt his SoTOratgTJ and to take her e-'iuinands, say as to the Q&SCUm fn-m 

the tnrone, Ifea arrangement, amendinenl nation] oonstrnotton, 

nd Minister will congratojj oat from their 

i dni all that Deed be said o Bdentially communicated as 

under aeaX We seem to be able even to realize that Her Majesty may 
order ■ dissolution and From Osborne, and perhaps oom- 

mand the Leader of the Opposition to form a Ministry, from Balmoral, 
without any aged statesman bavins bis health endangered by a railway 
I of seven hundred miles to BaDater. The Telephone has been pro- 
perly presented at Court, for there is no institution in England to which 
ii will be a mater convenience than the Court iu its Constitutional rela- 
tions With Minister* and Lenders. 

A Cheap Telephone.— Prof. Barrett, in a recent lecture on the tel- 
ephone, gave, says Nature, a receipt for making a cheap one. Take a 
wooden tooth powder box and make a hole about the size of a half-crown 
in the lid and the bottom. Take a disc of tinned iron, such as can be had 
from a preserved meat tin, and place it on the outside of the bottom of 
the box, and fix the cover on the other side of it. Then take a small bar- 
magnet, place on one end a small cotton or silk reel, and round the reel 
wind some iron wire, leaving the ends loose. Fix one end of the magnet 
near, as near as possible without touching, to the disc, and then one part 
of the telephone is complete. A similar arrangement is needed for the 
other end. The two are connected by the wire, and with this Prof. Bar- 
rett says he has been able to converse at a distance of about 100 yards. 

A curious experiment was tried, recently, with the telephone. Sev- 
enteen persons joined hands in a room, the first and last each holding an 
end of the wires. A conversation then took place through the bodies of 
these seventeen gentlemen. 



THE NEW IMPERIAL DISTINCTION. 
The London Times, referring to the institution of the new order of 
distinction to be enjoyed by the Princesses of the Royal family of En- 
gland and the wives or other female relatives of Indian Princes and by 
other English ladies related to persons who have held high office in India, 
observes that it is but a natural sequel to the flow of titles to which the 
assumption of an Imperial designation by the Sovereign gave occasion. It 
would be out of place to inquire whether anything very serious has been 
contemplated in the institution of this novel order; but the Times would 
willingly see in it an expression, however figurative, of Her Majasty's 
anxiety to promote the movement, which has of late attracted so much 
attention, towards the elovation of the female sex in India. Indian princes 
now mingle freely in English society, and every day a clearer mutual un- 
derstanding between members of the two peoples and countries is estab- 
lished. Now that English and Indian princes are united with distin- 
guished English ladies in the same exalted society, the last social barrier 
of this kind might seem to be removed. 



Savings and Loan. 



SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY* 
619 Clay Street- 

At a meeting of the Board of Directors, beld this clay, a 
dividend was declared, free of Federal Tax, of eight (8) per cent per annum 
on all deposits for the six months ending December 31, 1877. Dividend payable on 
and after the 15th instant. CYRUS W. CARMANY, Secretary. 
San Francisco, J anuary 8, 1878. Jan. 12. 

THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

Deutsche Spar mid Lcibbank, Mo 536 Californiastreet, San 
Francisco. Officers : President, L. GOTTIG Board of Directors. — Fred. 
Roeding, H. Schmieden, Chas. Kohler, Dan. Mever, Edw. Kruse, George H. Eggers 
N. Van Bergen, H. L. Simon. Secretary, GEO. LETTE ; Attorney, JOHN R. 
JARBOE. July 21. 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK —GUARANTEE CAPITAL, 8300,000. 

Officers: President, John Parrott; Vice-President, Jerome 
Lincoln ; Secretary, W. S. Jones ; Attorney, Sidney V. Smith. Loans made on 
Real Estate and other Approved Securities. Office : No. 216 Sansome street, San 
Francisco. Oct. 14. 



411 



FRENCH SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 
Bnsh street, above Kearny, O. IWahe, Director. Loans 

made on real estate and other collateral securities at current rates of 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Masonic Saving's and Loan Bank, No. 6 Post street, Ma- 
sonic Temple, San Francisco —At a meeting of the Board of Directors of this 
Bank, held January 2 1st. 1878, a dividend was declared at the rate of eight (8) per 
cent, per annum on Term Deposits, and six and three-tenths (6 3-10) per cent, per 
annum on Ordinary Deposits, for the semi-annual term ending January 28th, 1878, 
payable on and after January 28th. 1S7S, free of Federal Tax. 
January 21, 1878. [Jan. 26.] H. T. GRAVES, Secretary. 

ODD FELLOWS' SAVINGS BANK. 

Election Notice. —Not ice is hereby given that the annual 
meeting of the members of the Odd Fellows' Savings Bank, for the election of 
Directors of said bank for the ensuing year, will be held at the office of the bank, 
Room No. 2, Odd Fellows' Hall, No. 325 Montgomery street, on MONDAY, February 
11, A. D. 1878. Polls to be opened at 7 o'clock p. a.,* and closed at 9 o'clock r. M. of 
that day. JAMES BENSON, Secretary. 
San Francisco, Jan. 30, 1878. Feb. 2. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The Hlbernia Savings and Loan Society, Northeast Corner 
of Montgomery and Post streets, San Francisco, January 25, 1878. — At a regu- 
lar meeting of the Board of Directors of the society, held this day, a dividend at the 
rate of 7J per cent, per annum was declared on all deposits for the six months end- 
ing on the 21st inst., payable from and after this date, and free from Federal tax. 
Feb. 2. EDWARD MARTIN, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The French Savings anil Loan Society has declared a Div- 
idend of Eight (8) per cent, per anuuro, free of Federal Tax, for the half year 
ending December Slat, 1S77, payable on and after January 18th, 1878. By order. 
Jan. 19. GUSTAVE MAHE, Director. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Feb. 9, 1878. 



Theatrical, Etc. 



California Theater.— In the first place, Signor Majeroni is a great 
actor. "We say this with a full appreciation of the significance and value 
of the words. In intensity, finish and artistic elaboration of detail he is 
a worthy compatriot of Salvini and Eistori In fact, Italy has this dis- 
tinction among the countries from which we import stars: It has given us 
nothing but good actors, and the remarkable ability of the Signorina re- 
minds us to add, good actresses also. The Old Corporal, in which the Sig- 
nor opened on Monday evening last, is perhaps better known to our English 
public as Cartouche. It is not an exceptionally interesting play, nor is 
the probability of its plot remarkable, but the principal character of the 
"Old Soldier" is a powerful and effective one in this actor's hands. The 
scene in which the "Corporal " is stricken dumb when accused of theft, is 
one of the most realistic effects ever seen on any stage, and his panto- 
mimic action afterwards, was painfully perfect. We unhesitatingly ac- 
cord Majeroni an exalted place as an emotional and tragic actor, and can 
readily see the success that will follow him in the East when his knowl- 
edge of our tongue becomes more perfect. Mr. Keene had a slight part 
as "General Eoquebert," and the same can be said, of Miss Ellie Wilton 
as "Mineade Ranitzberg." The latter, however, did what she had to do 
with her usual grace, and dressed the part with great taste and effective- 
ness. Mr. Long as " Lucien " and Miss Chapman as "Genevieve " were 
capital, the latter being unusually good. Outside of the star, however, 
the two successes of the piece were Mr. Bishop as " Frochard " and Mr. 
Wilson as " Pieard." The former gave a portrayal of a cool, malevolent, 
apathetic villain of a small and mean type, that was inimitable in its 
completeness. We are not sure that this is not the best bit of work 
which Mr. Bishop has yet given us, and at the same time one measurably 
out of his usual vein. On Thursday, Jealousy, a society play, as it is 
called, was produced, the cast including both the Majeronis. This work 
bears a suspiciously strong family likeness to Led Astray, and was doubt- 
less "Boucicaulted " from the same original. It is not so cleverly done 
as its English prototype, and the action is tedious until the end of the 
second act. Here both the Majeronis achieved a veritable sensation and 
received a most enthusiastic recall. The scene is that in which the " Mar- 
quis " discovers the "Marchioness" reading her lover's letters, and in- 
forms her of the death of his rival The intensity and naturalness of his 
fury and contempt, and his wife's mingled terror, shame and despair were 
sufficient to hold the audience spell-bound and win a most hearty recogni- 
tion of the consummate art displayed. Mr. Mestayer made an excellent 
"Biario," albeit with occasional lapses towards his burlesque manner, 
while Sir. Harry Edwards' reappearance was heartily hailed by the audi- 
ence. His "General De Lucca "could hardly have been better. The 
other characters were ably sustained by the company. Jealousy for to- 
day's matinee. 

Herold's Matinee. — In spite of wet and stormy weather, the con- 
cert last Wednesday afternoon, at Metropolitan Temple, was the best at- 
tended of the series, so far. The public has read our opinion of their 
negligence in this respect for the last two weeks, and like a good public, 
probably resolved to amend. And they were richly rewarded for their 
courage in risking a wetting. The Svmphonische Dichtung of Liszt was 
played very carefully, and most accurately interpreted. By the by, if 
some of the critics — no, not critics — but the gentlemen who write about 
music, would attend the Herold Tuesday rehearsals, at 1 o'clock, they 
would be less ignorant than they are, if possible, in their criticisms — that 
is, in their notices of classical music. As dramatic critics they are per- 
haps beyond criticism ; certainly they are as conscientious and as capable 
as any journalists now writing about the drama in the United States, and 

Eersonally they are gentlemen in every sense of the word. But knowing 
hakspeare by heart does not qualify them to write about music, and it 
is to be regretted that a duty is thrust upon them which they are obliged, 
though incompetent, to perform. However, last Wednesday's concert, as 
aforesaid, was a rich treat and well appreciated. Hermann's capriccio in 
I) minor, for three violins, exquisitely played by Messrs. Widmer, Hey- 
man and Homeier, gained for them an enthusiastic encore. They re- 
peated the allegro movement. If they only get together frequently they 
cannot fail to produce great results, all three being enthusiastic workers. 
We would suggest to them, however, that it would be more useful to form 
a string quartette, as the compositions for three violins are comparatively 
limited, while the field of quartettes is exhaustless. The introduction to 
the third act of Lohengrin was played with great precision, the 
trombones and horns being a little too noisy for the delicate accom- 
paniment which supports them. Mendelssohn's "Calm Sea" overture 
presented less difficulties than the other serious numbers, and went very 
smoothly, the movement in double time especially. A little more atten- 
tion to the conductor would have ensured greater precision in the com- 
mencement. This is a fault which can easily be remedied, and its cor- 
rection would be very gratifying to record. Next Wednesday the "Sa- 
kuntala" overture will be repeated, as we suggested it should be, and M. 
Savenier, our new cornet player, will play a polka by Lamotte. Why is 
it that all great cornet players play polkas, when there are so many pieces 
that they could offer an audience which are not polkas ? The Italian 
symphony, with its lovely andante and exquisite saltarello, is also on the 
programme, together with three other numbers. 

Baldwin's. — The Lyster English Opera Company opened here last 
Monday, and have met with better success than was anticipated by many. 
The opera was La FiUe dt Madame Angot. Miss Catherine Lewis, as 
" Clairette," acted and sang with a vim and chic that more than increased 
the good impression she made at the Emerson Opera House. Her style is 
extremely piquant and taking, and her voice among the very best we have 
heard in opera bouffe. The feeling of strangeness andstiffness peculiar to 
a newly gathered company was noticeable at first, but is gradually wear- 
ing away. Of the other members of the company, the best received were 
Miss Marian Singer and Mr. Harry Gates, who gave good accounts of 
themselves. The company further embraces Miss Hattie Moore, Miss 
Dora Viscinia, and Messrs. Tilla, Kinross and Dauphin. We shall speak 
more minutely of the capacity and performance of these when, by a little 
more practice together, they become more legitimately subject to exacting 
criticism. 

Krag Champagne. — Private Cuvee, in quarts and pints ; Shield — 
Krug — in quarts and pints ; Premiere Qualite, in quarts and pints. For 
sale by Hellman Bros. & Co., corner Front and Jackson. 



THE BATES TESTIMONIAL. 
Last Saturday evening Baldwin's Theater was crowded to its utmost 
capacity by one of the most brilliant and fashionable audiences that could 
possibly be brought together, the occasion being the complimentary bene- 
fit tendered to Mr. George Bates by his former and present pupils. As a 
rule we avoid criticising an amateur performance. Praise is often mistaken 
for flattery, and a kindly suggestion frequently brings down condemnation 
on our heads. In this instance, however, we will deviate from our regu- 
lar course and say a few words complimentary and otherwise about the 
actors. The performance commenced with the fourth act of Tlte Mer- 
chant of Venice. During its representation Mr. W. B. Tyler did some 
very good acting as the traditional Jew. His capital make-up de- 
serves special mention. Carroll Cook as the "Duke,"C. L. Miel as 
"Gratiano," and F. M. Gilmore as " Balthazar " were well up in their 
parts. The act went off very smoothly, and showed unmistakable signs 
of earefulpreparation. The dagger scene from The Wife was very nicely 
acted, S. H. Daniels sustaining the character of " Julian St. Pierre," and 
F. S. Wildes that of "Ferrardo." Mr. Daniels played with a certain 
ease and grace that was most refreshing. We think, however, there are 
parts better suited to him than the one he chose. The farce of Diamond 
Cut Diamond was hardly up, in point of excellence, to the balance of the 
bill. It served, however, to introduce Miss Charlotte Hammond, a beau- 
tiful blonde, who completely astonished the audience by her graceful stage 
appearance. The other characters were well sustained by E. C. Masten 
as "Capt. Seymour," P. P. Hammond as "Capt. Howard," W. P. Mel- 
ville as "Trap," A. E. Castle as" Trick," and P. E.Vandor as "Mr. Heart- 
ley." When the curtain fell at the close of the farce, one could easily Bee that 
the audience were impatiently waiting its being rung up again. The 
fifth act of Richard III. was next on the programme, and it had been 
freely whispered around that the hit of the evening would be made during 
its representation. It was generally supposed that J. M. McDonald, Jr., 
who assumed the title role, would surprise every one by his masterly im- 
personation. This, doubtless, would have been the case had not a " Pvich- 
mond" suddenly loomed up and made his presence most manifest. That 
Mr. McDonald's " Kichard" was good no one will gainsay; but that W. 
H. Haverstick's "Richmond" was better, there is not the slightest doubt. 
The couch scene of " Richard" was a splendid piece of acting; but he 
overdid himself, and his after efforts fell flat. " Richmond," on the con- 
trary, reserved his force and power for the last grand speech to his soldiers, 
during which he made every line tell. His best acting, however, or rather 
that which impressed us most, was during the Prayer scene. Here he ob- 
tained that mastery over his audience which so delights old actors. From 
the first line :" 0, thou, whose captain I account myself," to the conclu- 
sion of the prayer, the theater was as hushed and quiet as the grave; and 
the round of applause that followed was fully deserved. The farce, Ici on 
Parle Francais closed the programme, and the capital acting of C. L. 
Miel as "Victor," H. A. Adams as "Angelina," C. K. Bonestell as 
"Major Rattan," and A. Cox as "Anna Maria," sent everybody home 
with a laugh upon their face. Taken altogether, the performance was a 
grand success, and one of which both teacher and pupils can feel justly 
proud. 

CALIFORNIA THEATER. 

Bash Street, abov* Kearny.-- John HfcCnllongh, Proprietor 
and Manager; Barton Hill, Acting; Manager. Great Success of the Re- 
nowned Italian Actor, SIGNOR EDoARDO MAJERONI. First Appearance of SIG- 
NORA GUILIA TESSERO MAJERONI. Signor D. De Vivo, Agent for Signor 
Majeroni. Re-appearance of HENRY EDWARDS and MISS KATE DENIN. This 
(Saturday) Afternoon and Evening, will be presented for the first time here, a new 
Sensational Play, in four acts, written expressly for Signor and Signora Majeroni, 
by Achille Montagni, and translated into English bv F. Morrell, Esq., entitled 
JEALOUSY; or, MISTAKEN EDUCATION. In Rehearsal— A new Romantic Play, 
written expressly for Signor Majeroni, entitled A LIVING STATUE. In Active Pre- 
paration— raEDELUGE^ Feb. P. 

GRAND OPERA HOUSE, 

Mission Street, between Third and Fourth.— M. A. Ken- 
nedy, Acting Manager. This Theater will re-open this (Saturday) Matinee, 
Feb. 9th, with the Company thoroughly reorganized, for the proper representation of 
the new version of UNCLE TOM'S CABIN (first time in this citv) with over one hun- 
dred genuine colored Jubilee Singers in the great PLANTATION SCENE! This 
production will surpass anything of its kind ever seen on the Pacific Coast. For full 
particulars see bills during the week. Sunday Evening-, Feb. 10th, Benefit of MISS 
ROSE MOSS, in her own play e ntitled BROKEN CHAINS. Feb. 9. 

BUSH STREET THEATER. ~ 

Charles E. Locke, Lessee; Frank Lawlor, Acting; Manager. 
Theater Packed Niglitlv. This (Saturday) Afternoon and Evening-, MADAME 
RENTZ'S FEMALE MINSTRELS in the new programme, and MABEL SANTLEY'S 
BURLESQUE TROUPE in the laughable Burlesque, JACQUIN-JACQUIN. Monday 
Evening, Feb. 11th — New Acts ! New Songs ! And, after elaborate preparation, new 
scenery by Graham, new costumes, the original music, and the full strength of the 
Double Combination, in the very popular Burlesque, IXION. Seats at Box Office. 

BALDWIN'S THEATER. 

Thomas Mag- aire. Manager : Fred. Lyster, Director.— Bril- 
liant Success of MISS CATHERINE LEWIS. This (Saturday) Evening, Feb. 
9th, LA FILLE DE MME. ANGOT, Opera Bouffe in three acts, MISS CATHERINE 
LEWIS as CLAIRETTE, supported by a Full and Efficient Company, Grand Chorus 
of Thirty, and Full Opera Band. This Afternoon, at 2 o'clock, ONLY LA FILLE DE 
MME. ANGOT Matinee. In Active Preparation— GIROFLE-GIKuFLA. Feb. 0. 

SCHMIDT QUINTETTE MUSICAL RECITALS. 

Second Subscription Series. 
MERCANTILE LIBRARY HALL. 

Second Concert, Friday. February 15th. Miss Alice Schmidt, 
Pianoforte; MR. LOUIS SCHMIDT, JR., and MR. CLIFFORD SCHMIDT, 
Violins; MR. LOUIS SCHMIDT, Viola; and MR. ERNST SCHMIDT, Violoncello. 
Assisted by MRS. HENRY NORTON, Soprano. Subscription List open at Gray's 
Music Store. Box Office open for reservation of seats on the morning of the Concert. 
N. B. — No seats can be reserved at the Hall. Feb. 9. 

R. HEROLD'S FOURTH ORCHESTRAL MATINEE ~ 

Will take place at the Metropolitan Temple, Firth street, 
near Market, on WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON, February 13th, at 3 o'clock p.m. 
Box Sheet will open on TUESDAY and WEDNESDAY, February 12th and 13th, at 
Gray 'a Music Store, 105 Kearny street. CHARLES SCHUTZ, 
Feb. 9. Business Manager. 

MRS. 3. MELVILLE SNYDER, 
fi t O Mason street, between Bosh and Sutter, Teacher of 

\J J_t3 Elocution for Parlor, Stage, Bar or Pulpit. Voice Culture, Dramatic El- 
ocution Specialties. English Opera, Ballad and Bravura Singing and Piano Thor- 
oughly Taught. Terms moderate. Feb. 9. 



;•■ 






CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



•i. 

ttr 



□o 
de 



de 
de 



" ' DEATH WINS THIS TIME. " 
Giovanni Maria Maatai Fcrr etti. I 

- 
til t>i»- Kith J 
-»oo»nd year of bjaaffloa. Born tt Bint- 
r *. be was in j thai tn m often obliged to 

; Ms . -j.il.-i tie Attacks. That he 
I oouras attributable tothi 
<>f lif--. Hi- l<i.>L,T;ipliy ii published in thou 
ui be foiin 1 in any Encyclopedia, bo that 
it i» wMoaaar* to -.■'> Into tin- farfous events >>i hi* lona lira hare. His 
■. though long expected, is greatly to be 
K ng Humbert baa only been on toe throne ■ few weeks : all 
ind liable to be involved in war at am moment, while 
- "ii the thr-vit of Constantinople. < twin- to the por- 
tion of affairs, it is probable that the enclave will not await the 
f the foreign Cardinals, but be summoned at ono& The late Pope 
inarkahle for bis great liberality of ideas. Daring bis pon- 
. numeroaa drl] meaanree were passed promoting the agricultural 
Intoreete, radii railroad and telegraph companies, 

condition of the poor. Re is said never to have re- 

?! his Iiin-r.il views, although the ball that he started rolling went 
n-1 the limit he designed, and the Italian Republicans are to-day 
■unong treme and violent radicals. It is only a few weeks 

"ius the Ninth sent nisbleeaingancl full forgiveness tovlctorEmman- 
the latter 1 ty dying at the Quirin d. Now he hitnself|has followed 
hie old enemy, and oon are beyond the reach of the petty quarrels of 
tli. rbe reign of Pine the Ninth was a very eventful one. Italy 
and the Papal states taken away from him, It is 
chiefly, however, remarkable for the EncylicaJ of 1804, with its syllabus of 
condemned pi nd the Vatican Council of '09-70, at which the 

dogm a of Papal Infallibility was confirmed. The gentleness and many 
■ of the late Pope are matters of history, and his loss cannot but be 
i by all ' Catholics ae a most deplorable one. At this date it is idle 
to Speak of hit n o o ooo or. Until the smoke ascends from the 

chimney of the Sistine Chapel, announcing the election of the new Pope, 
all ramorfl must be pure conjecture. The names of Cardinals Bilio and I)i 
Pietro have been freely used, but beyond the supposition that Pio Nono's 
successor will be an Italian, from the fact that "forty-seven of the mein- 
the Conclave are of that nationality, nothing is known. Should 
the < lonclave not meet until the arrival of the foreign Cardinals, there 
will doubtless be endless political intrigues in the interest of a liberal can- 
didate. In exceeding the years of St. Peter, as ia well known, the late 
Pope contradicted the words uttered at his coronation : " Non videbis an- 
not Petri." The prescribed requiem masses will be strictly offered in this 
city, where there are seventeen churches and chapels of the Roman Cath- 
olic faith. 

A RARE CHANCE TO GET A HOMESTEAD. 

Never was there a better time to get a homestead than now. Real 
Estate is cheaper to-day than it ever will be again. At the end of a 
period of exceptional severity, the money market is tight, and values 
generally are depressed. It is, therefore, as we have said, a good time to 
buy. Soon a bountiful harvest will set all things right again, and it is 
certain that in a few months hence, when the price of the season's crops 
is distributed throughout the community, as it will be, the value of real 
estate will go up. Buying property when it is low is a3 applicable to the 
purchase of real estate as it is to other things. It is low enough in all 
conscience just now, and, therefore, now is the time to buy. Money not 
earning very large interest could not be better employed. Savings Banks 
may be badly managed, and fail, but real estate remains, and increases 
in value with the city's growth. It has been the experience everywhere 
and always, that he who buys a homestead lays the foundation for a for- 
tune. There will be an exceptionally good opportunity to invest on 
Thursday next, the 14th of February. On that day the Real Estate As- 
sociates, through their auctioneer, Mr. J. O. Eldridge, will offer for sale 
splendid homestead lots in all parts of the city. The catalogue is too long 
for us to reprint, but it can be obtained at the office of the " Associates," 
or from the auctioneer, and ought to be attentively perused by intending 
buyers. The terms are easy, being one-fifth cash, the balance on the 
well and favorably known credit system adopted by the Real Estate 
Associates. 

GOOD FOR DAVTD BUSH. 

Mr. Bush has accomplished his purpose of raising a sum of money 
to employ a certain number of unemployed men to improve the Park. 
Mr. Bush proposed that one hundred citizens, himself included, should 
contribute §50 each toward a fund to furnish work to one hundred men 
in Golden Gate Park. The proposition was entirely unselfish. Only 
charity and a consideration for the public good were made manifest. But 
what is everybody's work Mr. Bush found to be nobody's, so he enthusi- 
astically set to work to canvass subscriptions. To-day, as will be seen in 
another place, he reports the consummation of the work, and something 
more. Mr. Bush has shown what can be done were a little energy and 
earnestness is displayed. Cannot others follow his example ? It is evi- 
dently a good field to work in, and the chances of success are favorable. 
The unemployed can also have in this way an opportunity to bridge the 
present period of industrial inactivity, and the city will reap a substan- 
tial benefit. 

Bush Street Theater.— The so-called Female Minstrels still disport 
their nudity, and continue their exceedingly commonplace attempts at 
acting and singing at this theater. The exhibition, as a whole, amounts 
to nothing more than a variety show of average merit, and more than av- 
erage want of decency. It is to the credit of our ladies that they leave 
its patronage entirely to the male element, the bald-headed variety of 
which flock nightly t,o gaze at the spectacle of women, utterly unsexed, 
so far as the possession of any claia to modesty is concerned. We sup- 
pose it pays, however, and when the mighty dollar is held reasonably 
close to the managerial eye, it fails to see anything beyond. 

An on dit from the Mediterranean fleet is that, to check talk which 
is distasteful to him, the Duke of Edinburgh has had a legend written 
out large and stuck up in the Captain's cabin of the Sultan: "Please to 
remember that the Emperor of Russia is my father-in-law." 



THE PARK FUND. 

San I bnuurj 8th, 1878. 

Editor News Letter: The following inn complete Ileal of those sub- 
to the fund I log LOO of our unemployed workingmen 

at work in Golden Gate Park SO days at H per day i 

David Bush, Bolbrook, Merrill k Stel rtonl Do., \ L 

Bancroft ,v Co., Irving M. Soott, II. V. Scott, l >. 0. Mills, Leland Stan 
ford. B, EL Miller. Jr.. Louis Blase ft <V. H. M. Newhall A Co., Edward 
F. Ball, dr., Dunham, Garrigan ft Oo., Huntington ft Hopkins, Baker ft 
Hamilton, Thomas II. Selby ft Co., Levison Brothers, Blake, Bobbins ft 
Co., Bryant ft Taylor, Lewis 4 lunnlngham, Lloyd Tevu. Union 1 osuranoe 
Co., George Hearst, the Real Estate ^ssooiatee, John If. Saunders, 
i Lacy, Crane, Bastings ft Oo, Taber, Barker & Co., W. S. Lyle, 
Cast A Co., Nolan Brothers, w. v. Babcock, Dodge, Sweeney ft Co., 
Spruanea, Stanley ft Co., WeUman, Trek ft Co., Pope ft Talbot. Forbes 
Brothers, < !. Adolnhe Low ft < '.>., WHmerding ft < Jo., George W. ( libbe 
ft Co., David l>. Colton, Charles Crocker. Daniel Cook, 1. Clazier & Co., 

A. s. Roeenbaum ft Co., Joseph C Eastland, Michael Hawkins, Turner, 
Kennedy ft Shaw, Hinckley, Spiers & Hayes, Horace Davis & Co., .las. 
\j. Barker, Home Mutual Insurance < 'o., Fireman's Fund Insurance Co., 
Mr*. A. J. Stiles, C. C. Hastings & Co., John W. Taylor. Murphy, 
Grant $.Co., Levi Strauss ft Co., H. S. Crocker ft Co., Mrs. R, S. Floy'd, 
RedingtOp ft Co., Green Street Congregational Church, Unknown Donor, 
E. E. Eyre, J. M. Pike, Folger, Schilling & Co,, Kittle & Co., Main ft 
Winchester, Whittier, Fuller & Co., J. W. Davidson & Co. (White 
House), H. Schussler, Kaindler & Co. (City of Paris), S. L. Jones, F. H. 
Woods, California Furniture Manufacturing Co., Lazard Freres, Hutch- 
inson ft Mann, Cash, Sather ft Co., Charles De Young-, Geo. J. Brooks, 
Falkner, Bell ft Co., Sullivan, Kelly & Co., Meeker, James & Co., M. 
Mayblum, Hecht Bros, ft Co., J. B. Haggiu, F. F. Low, Livingston & 
Co., Schmieden", Hochstadter ft Co., Rodgers, Meyers & Co., B. David- 
son ft Co., J. Lerapke, Samuel Hill, James W. Burnhani & Co., B. Na- 
than ft Co., Thomas Day, Savage & Son, A. F. Nye & Co., Stein, Simon 
& Co., W. ft J. Sloane ; Tobin, Davidson & Co.; Greenebaum & Co., C. 

B. Jennings, L. R. Townsend ; Esberg, Bachman ft Co.; Weed & King- 
well, Emile Boesch, Calvin Nutting ft Son; Rankin, Brayton ft Co.; 
Wm. Smith, N. S. Arnold, Forsaith & Dodge, R, Hoehkofler, Palmer 
Bros., Michael Castle, C. Muller, Dutton & Withington, Lilienthal & 
Co., Godchaux Bros. & Co., A. Roman & Co. 

The above names represent a total amount subscribed of $5,215, of 
which 100 have subscribed $50 each, and the ballance lesser amounts, as 
they could afford. Very respectfully, David Bush. 



ART JOTTINGS. 

A finely made portrait — that is, it is on good canvas and seems Bolid 
and well made mechanically — of Governor Irwin is on exhibition in a 
Kearny street window, where they sometimes have better things for the 
passer-by to look at. It is labeled as being made by two artists. Diligent 
inquiry did not enable us to ascertain what part each took in the work, 
and as it appears so like the result of one man's efforts, we conclude the 
one did the posing and drawing, the other the painting. We were told 
that this portrait was destined to grace the Capitol, in company with eth- 
ers of a like nature placed there two years ago. It is said that we all 
have to obtain a knowledge of art by experience in bying trash and then 
better things, and upon this principle it is perhaps fitting that the State, 
through her assembled wisdom, should obtain experience in like manner. 

The week has been rather unfavorable to the exhibition of Rosenthal's 
picture, and we are told that the principal attendance comes from parties 
visiting the city from the interior. As soon as the weather clears, and 
not before, city people will put in an appearance. Criticism upon the 
picture has been in the main favorable, with several papers yet to hear 
from. 

The Art Association are to have an exhibition soon, and it is intended 
to make it the most attractive of any yet had. Well, there is certainly 
ample room for improvement, and if all the artists will work together 
there can be no doubt of entire success. 

The School of Design is doing finely, notwithstanding the dull times, 
having begun the session with nearly forty pupils, with a good prospect 
of a fifty per cent, increase before the term closes. 



AN UNFOUNDED CHARGE. 

The " Chronicle," without truth, charged the Central Pacific Rail- 
road with refusing to assist Sacramento to fight the flood. The matter 
was made a question of privilege yesterday in the Assembly, by Mr. 
Johnson. He said the reporter of the Chronicle had, unintentionally of 
course, done gross injustice to the officers of the Central Pacific Railroad, 
with reference to their action during the threatened danger from inunda- 
tion, charging that the Company had refused to render any assistance in 
preventing rupture of the levee until they had been guaranteed pay for 
the same. Johnson said, on the contrary, the fact was that the Company 
gave the first notice of the danger, and furnished, free of charge, a steam- 
boat, barges, trains of cars, dirt, sacks, workmen and tools, and gave 
their own labor for strengthening the levee and protecting the city. It 
was only with reference to the large crevasse at Lovedall's ranch outside of 
the city that they thought they should be paid for work. Master 
mechanic Ben Welch, engineers Stephens and Wilkinson, foreman Shields 
and Captains Foster and Rodgers gave their personal assistance free. 



Interesting to Horse-breeders, Trainers and Others.— There is 

an opportunity just uow to get an exceptionally valuable place for horse- 
breeding, training, etc. The Agricultural Park, Los Angeles, is to let, 
as will be seen by an advertisement in another column. It would be im- 
possible to overrate the advantages of the property, or the beauty of its 
surroundings. At this time the place is well worth a visit. A carpet of 
emerald green covers the whole country, from plain to hill-top. Never 
was the prospect of abundant crops so promising, and the climate in that 
neighborhood cannot be equaled. Proposals for the property will be re- 
ceived up to February 15th. The buildings are all in good order, luxuri- 
ant shade trees embellish the entire grounds, and there is no better place 
of its kind on this coast. 



New Music from M. Gray. 

French and English. 



-"Did He But Know," romance in 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Fet>. 9, 1878. 



ONE DAY. 

"What saith the sightless Poet, brighter eyed 

Through inward vision than all the bards of old ? 
The gods in wisdom infinite, manifold, 

Have reason's guidance unto men supplied 

Enough for one day's usage — naught beside, 
And He to whom a thousand years are told 
Even as a tale hath bidden us have and hold 

The day sufficient, let whatsoe'er betide. 

There is no morrow ! Though before our face 

A shadow named so stretches, we always 

Fail to o'ertake it, hasten as we may. 
God only grants to us one inch of space 
Islanded, 'twixt th' Eternities, as place 

To stand and work — the inexorable To-Day ! 

— Margaret Preston, in Independent. 



THE HEAL CAUSE OP DISTRESS. 

It has been established, beyond disputation, that there are in this 
city at the present time a large number of men and women, able and will- 
ing to work, who cannot find employment, and who are, to a large extent, 
without the means of procuring the necessaries of life. It may be said, 
with all the truth which is attached to the most veracious prose, that there is 
not a large center of population in the civilized universe in which there is 
no t — be its condition, as regards communistic prosperity or adversity, what 
it may — a goodly number of people existing in enforced idleness. But it 
does seem strange tbat in a new country, which has within itself the pro- 
ducing elements of almost untold wealth, and which has within itself the 
capacity to support, in affluence and plenty, a community of three or 
four times its present population, any considerable number of industrious 
people should be unemployed for so long a period as to leave them in des- 
titute circumstances. And this problem becomes all the more inexplica- 
ble when it is borne in mind that, up to a very recent period, all descrip- 
tions of labor were paid for, in this and neighboring States in wages drawn 
upon a very high scale ; and that even at the present time, though busi- 
ness is dull and enterprises are not being undertaken with that vigor 
which is one of our characteristics, the ruling rates of remuneration are 
better than in almost any other portion of the world. The News Letter 
ventures to believe that a solution of this new and curious phase of Cal- 
ifornian experience lies in the want of steadiness, which has become char- 
acteristic of a large proportion of our working people. A habit, having its 
inception in our pioneer days, of working for three or four months in a 
most industrious manner, and then laying off for a period long enough 
to spend their accumulations, either in laziness or dissipation, has grown 
to be regarded by this class as an eminently proper proceeding. In fact, 
there are a great number of old gold-field habits retained among all 
classes. Habits which may have been right, or at worst excusable, in a 
mining camp, but which are neither right nor excusable in a large city, 
full of restraining and ennobling influences. At this moment, when there 
are a great' number of people suffering from want — even though it is 
brought about, to a large extent, by their own improvidence— we do not 
desire to say one word which will stay any person's hand from performing 
any contemplated act of philanthropy. We are too fully convinced that 
there is a great deal of real distress existing around us. But, at the same 
time, we do urge that, in relieving such want as does exist, the cause 
which leads to that want should not be forgotten. It should be brought 
home to the working people, at every time and place possible, that they 
should cultivate habits of frugality and provideuce. We will even ven- 
ture to think that those eminent journalists who daily minister to the in- 
tellectual wants of the workingman, might drop a few hints in this di- 
rection out of their bounteous supply of wisdom. 

Before concluding, we have one word to add, for the especial benefit 
of those engaged in the good work of distributing eleemosynary aid. Be- 
ware of breeding pauperism. Let not a human being go without food and 
slielter, if it can be avoided ; but give the mendicant no encouragement. Seek 
for the -poor and proud, over whom misfortune has thrown a pall of gloom. 
The poor and proud, who are found housed away beside an empty cupboard 
and an empty fire-place. 

FAILURES IN 1877. 

The annual circular of the mercantile agency of Dunn & Co. states 
the business failures in San Francisco during the past year to have been 
163, with liabilities of §8,482,825, and assets of §5,508,615. During the 
year 1876 the failures numbered 79, with liabilities of 82,202,699, and as- 
sets of $1,231,789. This shows an increase in the extent of the failures of 
nearly three hundred per cent. The record for the balance of the State 
is somewhat better, the failures aggregating 288, with liabilities of 83,252,- 
853, the assets footing up 82.377,652, while the previous year there were 
169 failures, for the total sum of 81,674,974. the assets covering about 
half. The total indebtedness of bankrupts in the entire State sums up 
eleven and a half millions of dollars. These figures do not include joint 
stock companies, nor do they embrace banking establishments, and the 
year was certainly the most fatal to these of any in the history of the 
Pacific Coast. While it is very true 1877 was a season of dullness and 
depression in business circles, there have been no strictly mercantile 
causes for the downfall of so many business houses. The volume of trade 
was undoubtedly curtailed in many directions; but, on the whole, there 
was nothing to warrant great disasters. The course of prices has been 
more even than for some years past, and while real estate, both city and 
rural, have been very slow of sale, there has been no great shrinkage in 
values. Money has been plentiful, and rates of interest low, and, so far 
as we are able to learn, country merchants and farmers have paid up 
promptly. The figures given above also show that the increase in failures 
among country merchants have been only half aa much as in San Fran- 
cisco. 

The greatest depreciation in values has been in mining shares, nearly 
the entire list showing a decline during the year of from 25 to 75 per cent. 
Even the stock of the two "bonanza" mines is worth only half the price 
it sold for a year ago. In fact, the course of the stock market has been 
downward for over two years, and the nominal decrease in the value of 
the shares listed at the San Francisco Board foots up hundreds of millions 
of dollars. It is but fair, to assume, then, the bulk of the failures reported 
have been of houses directly or indirectly connected with stocks, and not 



of mercantile firms proper. But these figures even do not represent by 
any means the disasters which have befallen San Francisco from the de- 
cadence of stock gambling, and the consequent depreciation in mining 
stocks. There are scores of bankrupts who have staked their fortunes on 
California street and lost that have never been reported. Hundreds of 
strangers, lured by the tales of fortunes made in a day, have been en- 
tangled in speculation, and now know not where to get bread for their 
families. Nor does the list embrace property holders and professional 
men who have sunk their last dollar in the desperate game. It is a 
hopeful sign, however, when the dry rot extends to the regular houses 
engaged in stock dealing-, for it indicates that outsiders can no longer be 
drawn into the net, and the losses are falling where they properly should 
fall, and that ere long San Francisco will have been freed from this de- 
moralizing business. 



Insurance. 



INSURANCE AGENCY OF 

HUTCHINSON & MANN 

NO 314 CALIFORNIA STK££T, SAN FRANCISCO. 



AGENTS BOB THE 

Girard Ins. Co Philadelphia, Pa. New Orleans Ins. Ass'n New Orleans. 

Union Ins. Co Galveston, Texas St. Paul F. &, 1L Ins. Co... St. Paul, Minn. 

Home Ins. Co Columbus, Ohio Atlas Ins. Co Hartford Conn. 

People's Ins. Co Newark, N. J. Revere Fire Ins. Co Boston. 

National L. I. Co.,U. S. A..Wash'n, D. C. j Trade Ins. Co Camden, N. J. 

Capital Bepresented, Twelve Millions- 

POLICIES ISSUED ON DESIRABLE PROPERTY aT FAIR RATES. LOSSES 
EQUITABLY ADJUSTED AND PROMPTLY PAID. 

HUTCHINSON A- MANN, General Agents. 
May 5. 314 California street, San Francisco. 

HOME MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY OF CALIFORNIA. 

Principal Office, 406 Calif ornia Street, San Francisco. 
Cash Assets, January 1, 1S77, $£90,291 ; Liahilities, 86,952 ; Surplus for Policy 
Holders, $589,339. J. F. Houghton, President; Geo. H. Howard, Vice-President 
Charles R. Story, Secretary. R. H. MAGILL, H. H. BIGELOW, General Agents. 

Directors. — San Francisco — Geo. H. Howard, John H. Redington, J. F. Houghton 
R. B. Gray, Robert Watt, John Currey, L. L. Baker, W. F. Whittier, C. C. Burr, E. 
M. Root, W. H. White, J. L. N. Shepard, W. M. Greenwood, George S. Mann, Cyrus 
Wilson, W. T. Garratt, C. Waterhouse, A. P. Hotaling, A. Block, A. K. P. Harmon, 
G. S. Johnson, W. O. Wilson, A. W. Bowman, H. L. Dodge, Charles R. Story. Ala- 
meda County Branch — V. D. Moody, Chauncy Taylor, A. C. Henry, Robert S. Far- 
relly, Joseph E. Marlin, W. B. Hardy, T. B. Simpson. San Diego— A. H. Wilcox. 
Sacramento — Mark Hopkins, D. W. Earl, Julius Wetzlar, James Carolau. San Jose — 
T. Ellard Beans, B. D. Murphy, A. Poster, J. H. Dibble, J. S. Carter, Jackson Lewis, 
Jacob Rich, John Auzerais, John Balbach. Stockton— H. H. Hewlett, Chas. Bclding, 
J. D. Peters, A. W. Simpson, H. M. Fanning. Marysville— D. E. Knight. Grass 
Valley— Win, Watt, T. W. Sigourney. Portland, Oregon— W. S. Ladd, C. H. Lewis, 
P. Wasserman, B. Goldsmith, D. Maeleay. Virginia City, Nevada — John Gillig, Isaac 
L. Requa. March 17. 

FIRE AND MARINE INSURANCE.— UNION IfcS. CO. OF S. F. 

Tbe California Lloyds.— Established in 1861.— Nos. 416 and 
.418 California street. Cash capital $750,000 in Gold Assets exceed §1,000,000 
Coin. Fair Rates ! Prompt Settlement of Loses ! ! Solid Security ! ! DIRECTORS. 
—San Francisco — J. Mora Moss, N. G. Kittle, M. J. O'Connor, R. S. Floyd, Moses 
Heller, Adam Grant, Daniel Meyer, Antoine Borel, Charles Kohler, Joseph Seller, 
I. Lawrence Pool, A. Weill, Joseph Brandenstein, Charles Bauro, James Moffitt, Ed- 
ward Cadwalader, Benjamin Brewster, L. Cunningham, W. M. Hoag, Nicholas Lu- 
lling, John Parrott, L. A. Booth, J. Baum, M. D. Sweeney, Bartlett Doe, Gustave 
Touchard, J. H. Baird, J. G. Kittle, George C. Hickox, C. Ducommun, Wm. Scholle, 
John Conly, I. Steinhart, N. B. Stone, J. O. Eldridge, A. B. Phipps, Jas. M. Goewey. 
GUSTAVE TOUCHARD, President. N. G. K1TTLF,, Vice-President. 

Chaei.es D. Haven, Secretary. Geo. T. Bohen, Surveyor. July 28. 

THE STATE INVESTMENT AND INSURANCE CO. 
FIKE AND MARINE. 

C^ash Assets, $150,000.— Principal Office, 218 and 220 San- 
J some street, San Francisco. Officers : — Peter Donahue, President ; A. J. 
Bryant, Vice-President; Charles H. Cushinq, Secretary; H. H. Watson, Marine 
Surveyor. Board of Directors : — Peter Donahue, James Irvine, C. D. O'Sulbvan, 
A. Bocqueraz, R. Harrison, A. H. Rutherford, R. Bailey, E. W. Corbert, George O. 
McMullin, A. J. Bryant, Frank M. Pixley, E Burke, H. H. Watson, Dr. C. F. Buckley, 
P. J. White, W. A. Piper, M. Mayblum, Richard Ivers, John Rosenfeld, Daniel 
Callaghan. P. H. Russell, Sacramento. John G. Downey, Los Angeles. Wm. 
Hood, Sonoma County. H. W. Seale, Mayfield. Geo. Rutherford, San Jose. Feb. 13. 

INSURANCE COMPANIES. ~~ 

IMPERIAL OF LONDON, NORTHERN OP LONDON, AND 
GUEEN OF LIVERPOOL. 

Aggregate Cash Capital $33,000, 000. 



Robert Dickson, Manager. 
July 14. 



W. LANE BOOKER, Agent and Attorney. 
317 California street, S. F. 



NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE. CO., OF BOSTON, 

Has transacted tbe business of JLiie Insurance for nearly 
thirty -five years. Its assets amount to over Fourteen Million Dollars. The 
law of Massachusetts makes all its Policies nonforfeitable. It is a Purely Mutual Com- 
pany, dividing every cent of surplus among Policy-holders. This is the Only Com- 
pany on the Pacific Coast governed by the Massachusetts Lapse Law. This company 
hascomr.'ied with the new Insurance Laws of California. 



Sept. 22.] 



WALLACE EVERSON, General Agent. 

328 Montgomery street. 



THE SWISS MARINE INSURANCE COMPANIES COMBINED. 

Baloise, of Basle, Capital 5,000,000 francs; Helvetia, of 
St. Gall, Capital 10,000,000 francs ; Schweiz, of Zurich, Capital 5,000,000 francs. 
These three Companies are liable jointly and severally for all losses tbat may be sus- 
tained. Losses made payable in all the principal seaports of the world. In' the set- 
tlement of all claims under an English policy, our Companies will strictly adhere to 
the conditions and customs adopted at Lloyds, and submit to English jurisdiction. 
June 9. HENRY BALZER & CO., Agents, 213 Sansome St., S. F. 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INSURANCE CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 



C 



apital $5,000,000. — Agents: Balfonr, Ontbrie «fe Co.. No. 

230 California street, San Francisco. No. 18. 



. 9, 1878. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



twr*. 

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Bra 

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THE ROOTS OF THE ROSES. 

Tbo leaw-, »n> f.v.liiu- an»l falling, Ami when Um « inter is ofv, 
The wiml* *r h ihl. 

oloTer, 



But let DM tell you. iny child, 

■ . aa it closes, 
Ixrker and colder p 

i rosea 
Will keep alive in the now. 



mllow book to tin* oaves. 

Tlic raUn will WMUC on hi 

'it uml new, 
And the liveliest wayside bin 
Will shine with sun and dew. 



ino dear Joy I 
Iu baa u teora rammer now, 
Think how the roots ox the roses 
Are kept alive in the snow. 

THE RUSSIANS OP TO-DAY. 



-Alice Caru. 



Every Russian charity fce an innompleto copy of something French or 
u. Iti'ler Nicholas, if :\ foreign philanthropist was presented to 
.r, their conversation was sure t<> bear fruit in the shape of an or- 
der for bnildint tome new hospital or asylum on ;» ngantio scale. Archi- 
tects went to work, the Finance Minister groaned at having to pay so 
Dutch money for ■ caprice^ and the institution when founded generally did 
but little of the pood that was expected of it : but the Emperor was 
1, and that was enough. The Foundling Hospital at Moscow 
i good example nf the ostentation of Russian charity and of the 
which are begotten by ill-management. The place, which covers 
h ground as a village, contains 1,71X1 wot-nnrses and 2,000 babies. 
Fifty children are admitted daily, on mere presentation at the gate, no 
I. After having been washed, dressed, and ticketed, 
each child is a nurse, and remains in the hospital from three 

to six months, after which it is boarded out, its foster-mother receiving 
8 shillings a mouth for five years. At the expiration of this time, the 
board is reduced, and the nurse must contract to keep the child for one 
rouble a month till it shall be able to earn its own living ; or else the 
little creature is transferred to an industrial school. The boys are trained 
as Boidiere or mechanics, the girls as domestic servants; and the number 
young people whom the Foundling annually supports exceeds 
30,000. There is something grandiose in this charity, and although the 
lity in the hospital is very lar^e, owing to bad ventilation and un- 
il attendance, all the show part of its arrangement is very 
striking. Unfortunately, this famous foundling refuge has corrupted all 
the villages round Moscow. Peasant girls who have forgotten to get 
married send their babies to the institution, then offer themselves as wet- 
nurses. Having tattooed their offspring, each mother contrives to find 
her own, and takes charge of it by private arrangement with the nurse to 
whom it has been assigned. As babies are so much alike, the authorities 
cannot detect these interchanges, and do not attempt to do so. In due 
time the mother returns to her village with her own baby, whose board 
will be paid for by the State at the rate of 83. a month, as above said j 
and possibly next year and the year after she will begin the same game 
over again. Thus a fine premium is placed on immorality and fraud. 
The authorities know this ; they joke about the Foundling Hospital 
among themselves, but Government persists in keeping up the institution 
in it j unrcfornied state for the bewildering of foreigners. It is not in 
every country that one can see 2,000 babies and 1,700 wet-nurses under 
roof, and herein again is the superiority of Russia asserted. 
The present * 'zar founded a big refuge at St. Petersburg for workmen 
who had been disabled by accident. It was a realization of some French- 
man's idea for the creation of '* Invalides Civils," upon the theory that a 
mechanic who is crippled at his work deserves as much consideration as 
a soldier who gets maimed in war. But the refuge was organized on such 
a luxurious plan, that idle workmen began to injure themselves on pur- 
pose to obtain admittance to it. The place was full of malingerers, who, 
by their constant drunkenness, frightened away genuine sufferer-3 who 
wanted rest. One day, all the inmates were turned out together with a 
few roubles apiece to help them to set up elsewhere ; and then the place 
became a lunatic asylum ; but in a very quick time most of its old resi- 
dents were back in its walls, but they pretended to have become mad. 
There were sham melancholies, alcoholics, but chiefly epileptics, because 
a rogue who feigns fits is not suspected, owing to the mere fact that he is 
rational at ordinary times. The doctors tried to counteract the sham 
epilepsy by vigorous douches and doses of bromide of potassium ; and 
sometimes they tried what galvanic shocks would do with a hardened of- 
fender. But a mujick will stand a good deal of doctoring for the sake of 
getting free quarters throughout the winter. To this day the asylum gets 
crowded with pseudo lunatics whenever there is a slack season in trade ; 
and the authorities have discovered that it is best to let the abuse flour- 
ish, seeing that a patient who is accused of shamming instantly howls 
and gives trouble to prove that he is really afflicted. The fault of the 
system lies in the lavish extravagance which is used to convey an idea of 
the breadth of Imperial philanthropy. Workmen who have lived in 
sorts of pigstyes all their lives look upon the giant asylum, with its clean 
beds, refectories, baths, musical performances, and substantial dietary, as 
a terrestrial paradise. Outside St. Petersburg and Moscow Russian mad- 
houses are squalid prisons — as bad as Bedlam was a century ago ; but to 
these only genuine lunatics resort. 

There are no private charities in Russia, because no Muscovite is so 
silly as to subscribe money which will be handled by irresponsible per- 
sons. Government takes the initiative in everything, and issues orders 
for the building of hospitals and asylums without much reference to the 
needs of the locality where these institutions are set up ; but principally 
with a view to having a good account of charities to show in its yearly 
Blue-books. So many hospitals and asylums must be erected yearly, no 
matter where or how. A provincial town which has few paupers gets a 
command from St. Petersburg to build a poor-house, perhaps at a moment 
when its finances are at a very low ebb. The mayor writes humbly to re- 
monstrance that the ratepayers have been heavily assessed of late for the 
paving of their streets ; but he is answered by a report from a Govern- 
ment inspector setting forth that his town is notoriously in need of a 
poor-house, and there is nothing for it but to obey. No charity would 
ever be started if Government listened to the wailings of ratepayers. 
Provincial governors, again, who wish to earn a brilliant reputation, often 
go in for a course of building regardless of expense. Many_ Russian 
towns have hospitals of imposing size, far too large for their requirements. 
As soon as the governor who ordered them has gone away, they are aban- 



doned and go to ruin or get converted into barrack*. Ruastan hospitals 

It is not 1111 ■ 

common to hear of two patients afflicted with differenl being put 

in one bed. and of money voted tor dru nl in 1 lical feasts. 

Howei a 1 hospital may be, the municipal author* 

;t it to the Hom,' Office as a pattern establish- 
ment ; and they will not spend a kopeck on its Improvement, lest after 

: be abruptly called upon to build another on 

somen* at from the capital. Government meddlesome' 

nesa paralyzes local impulses. If a whole city became leprous, the mayor 
and his council would hesitate to cope with the evil until they had re- 
ceived orders from headquarters as to how they ought to act. Monks and 
int'is are required to be charitable : and to obey this official injunction 
l 'M have very pretty little infirmaries attached to their con- 
vents ; but this costs them nothing, for, being allowed to beg from door 
to door for the support of such places, they collect a great deal more than 
is wanted. They are rich beggars supporting poor beggars. Russian 
scholastic charities — that is, scholarships for the sons of poor gentlemen- 
are rather vehicles for ( lourt favor than eleemosynary institutions. They 
are numerous, but are conferred by pure caprice, and can be more pro- 
perly described uuder the head of Schools. — Pall Mall Gazette. 

Banks. 



NEVADA BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, 
SAJf FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Paid Up Capital $10,000,000, Gold. 

Surplus (U. S. Bonds) $2,500,000, Gold. 

DIRECTORS: 

Louis McLane President. | J. C. Flood Vice-President. 

John W. Mackay, W. S. O'Brien, James G. Fair. 

Cashier C. T. Christensen. 

Agent at Virginia, Nevada George A. King. 

Issues Commercial and Travelers' Credits, available in any part of the world. 

Makes Transfers of Money by Telegraph and Cable, and Draws Exchange at cus- 
tomary usances. This Hank hiis special facilities for dealing in Bullion. 

EXCHANGE on the Principal Cities throughout the United States, Europe, Japan, 
China and the East Indies, the Australian Colonies and New Zealand, and on Hon- 
olulu, Hawaii. 

New York Bankers Tub Bank of New York, N. B. A. 

London Bankers Messrs. Smith, Payne & Smiths. 

[January 26.] _^__^_^ 

THE BANE OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital $5,000,000. 

». O. MILLS President. | WM. AI/VORD...Vice-Pres't. 

THOMAS BROWN Cashier. 

Agents : 

New York, Agency of the Bank of Calfornia ; Boston, Tremont National Bank 
Chicago, Union National Bank ; St. Louis, Boatman's Saving Bank ; New Zealand, 
the Bank of New Zealand ; London, China, Japan, India and Australia, the Oriental 
Bank Corporation. 

The Bank has Agencies at Virginia City and Gold Hill, and Correspondents in all 
the principal Mining Districts and Interior Towns of the Pacific Coast. 

Letters of Credit issued, available in all parts of the world. Draw direct on Lon- 
don, Dublin, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, Hamburg, Frankfort-on-the-Main, Antwerp, 
Amsterdam, St. Petersburgh, Copenhagen, Stockholm, Christiana, Locarno, Mel- 
bourne, Sydney, Auc kland, Hongkong, Shanghai, Yokohama. Nov. 4. 

BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter.— Capital paid np, $1,800,- 
000, with power to increase to §10,000,000. Southeast corner California and San- 
some streets. Head Office— 5 East India Avenue, London. Branches— Portland, Or- 
egon; Victoria aud Cariboo, British Columbia. 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened subject to Check 
and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted available in all parts of 
the world. Approved Bills discounted and advances made on good collateral security. 
Draws direct at current rates upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents 
as follows : 

New York, Chicago and Canada— Bank of Montreal ; Liverpool— North and South 
Wales Bank ; Scotland— British Linen Company ; Ireland— Bank of Ireland ; Mex- 
ico and South America— London Bank of Mexico and South America ; China and 
Japan— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China, and Oriental Bank ; Australia 
and New Zealand— Bank of Australasia, Commercial Banking Company of Sydney, 
and English, Scottish and Australian Chartered Bank. 

Dec. 9. W. H. TILLINGHAST, Manager. 

THE FIRST NATIONAL GOLD BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Paid np Capital #2,000,000, Oold. President, R. C. Wool- 
worth ; Vice-President, D. Callaghan ; Cashier, E. D. Morgan. 

Directors :— R. C. Woolworth, D. Callaghan, C. G. Hooker, C. Adolph Low, Peter 
Donahue, D. D. Colton, Edward Martin, James Moffitt, N. Van Bergen. 

Correspondents— London : Baring Bros. & Co. ; Chartered Mercantile Bank of In- 
dia, London and China. Dublin : Provincial Bank of Ireland. Hamburg : Hesse, 
Neunian&Co. Paris: Hottinguer&Co. New York: National Bank of Commerce. Bos- 
ton : Blaekstone National Bank. Chicago : First National Bank. This Bank is pre- 
pared to transact a general Banking business. Deposits in Gold, Silver and Currency 
received subject to check or on special deposit. Exchange for sale on the principal 
cities of the United States, Great Britain, Ireland and the Continent. Commercial 
Credits issued available in Europe, Chii.a and Japan. Collections attended to and 
prompt returns made at the lowest market rates of Exchange. Jan. 19. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK (LIMITED). 

Capital, gi5»000,000, of which $3,000,000 is fully paid np as 
present capital. Reserve Fund, 8150,000. San Francisco Office, 424 Califor- 
nia street ; London Office. 22 Old Broad street. Manager, ARTHUR SCRIVENER ; 
Assistant Manager, CAMILO MARTIN; Cashier, WILLIAM STEEL. London 
Bankers, Bank of England and London Joint Stock Bank ; New York, Drexel, 
Morgan & Co. ; Boston, Third National Bank. This Bank is prepared to transact 
all kinds of General Banking and Exchange Business in London and San Francisco, 
and between said cities and all parts of the world. Jan. 19. 

THE ANGL0-CALIFORNIAN BANK (LIMITED). 
4 (."» ~fc California street, San Francisco. --- London Office. S 

41; -«£5& Angel Court ; New York Agents, J. W. Seligman & Co., 21 Broad street. 
Authorized Capital Stock, $0,000,000. Will receive Deposits, open Accounts, make 
Collections, buy and sell Exchange and Bullion, loan Money, and issue Letters of 
Credit available throughout the world. Sn^TEINHABT } Managers. 

P. N. ULTENTHAL, Cashier. Oct 4. 



8 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Feb. 9, 1878. 



WHY DO MEN RUN NEWSF APERS ? 
Judge Campbell, of counsel in the case of Pickering vs. De Young, 
argued the other day that it was not a libel to allege that a newspaper 
proprietor has accepted reward for his advocacy of a measure of public 
interest. Pickering in his paper joins issue upon that statement, protests 
that he esteems it a false and defamatory libel upon him, declaims in in- 
dignant tones against the principle sought to be laid down, turns up the 
whites of his eyes in horror at the thought, and looking askance at his 
neighbor of the Chronicle, thanks God that he is not a sinner like the 
fellow over the way. The dispute is a nice one as it stands, and is inter- 
• ■sting in that it openB up the whole question of the relations of the press 
towards the public. What is a newspaper ? Is it a huge benevolent in- 
stitution, run without motives of profit, and for the advantage of every- 
body except the proprietor ? If it be that, then for pure disinterested- 
ness, it is an institution unparalleled. Its like hath not been seen in these 
or any other times. It iB like that knowledge which passeth all under- 
standing. That a man should embark his capital, devote his best ener- 
gies, and risk his health in the most worrying and exacting of all human 
employments, and do all this without the admixture of one particle of 
expectation of reward, would indeed be a sight for men and angels to 
stand amazed at. If such unspeakable benevolence were really practiced 
in the Call offie, it would render that place so superlatively righteous, so 
ovenvhelmingly beneficent, that we should expect a just Providence to 
take cognizance of the fact, and to thunder forth to all mundane in- 
truders therein, that Divine command, never but once uttered upon earth, 
" Put off the shoes from thy feet, for the ground whereon thou standest 
is holy." Extreme as such recognition would seem to be, it must be con- 
fessed that it would be no more than the due of that man who, rising su- 
perior to all those considerations which ordinarily influence the human 
mind, is willing to give up himself and all that is his, in order to reap no 
higher reward than the smarting, blistering criticism of which a Picker- 
ing is so perpetually the painful subject. What bosb, to be sura ; what 
sheer humbug; what amazing effrontery ! Such pretenses are an insult 
to the common sense of this community. We all know how the Bulletin 
and Call changed their insensate hate of the Railroad into a loving ten- 
derness that is beautiful to behold. Does any man with a head upon his 
shoulders doubt the why and wherefore of the change? Was it from 
pure disinteredness that they made a contract to advertise a death-dealing 
drug, called Chloral Hydrate, as if it were the veritable Balm of Gilead? 
Did the contract on its face not show that it was a profit, that was to in- 
crease with the success of their advertising, for which they undertook this 
bad business? It did, and showing that, the line was clearly seen to be 
overstepped, which all reputable journals draw between what may and 
what may not be advocated for gain. Why does the Call twist and wrig- 
gle, and finally bend a reluctant knee to Kearney, whom it has personal 
reasons to hate ? Is the fact not very apparent that it is being driven, 
where it would fain not go, and all because it dreads a loss of circulation, 
or in other words a loss of profit ? A motive of gain is in this case so 
strong a passion that it actually overrides the hatred that is in the propri- 
etor's heart. Thus we arrive at the reductio ad absurdum of the man's 
pretenses. The fact is that the sooner the public comes to understand the 
value of all such pretenses the better. A newspaper is a purely commer- 
cial enterprise, that must be conducted upon business principles, or it will 
not long continue to be a newspaper. Its proprietor publishes what in 
the end he believes will best serve his property — that is, pay him best. 
There are many things he would not publish at any price, simply because 
no amount of coin likely to be paid him would compensate for the loss he 
would sustain, directly or indirectly, by their publication. When readers 
come to understand that fact, they will read newspaper articles for pre- 
cisely what they are worth, and no more. They will not accept false 
reasoning, or beHeve every editorial '* we " infallible that is employed by 
the Bulletin, the Call, or even by the News Letteb. It is the thing said, 
and not the anonymous " we," that gives it value. If it is true — if it car- 
ries force and conviction with it — then let it prevail, irrespective of 
whether the man who says it gains reward by saying it or not. This im- 
poses upon readers the duty of thinking, and of so reflecting as they read, 
as to succeed in measurably separating truth from error. If there be any 
willing to confess inability or unwillingness to do this, then we write not 
for such people. For them an infallible newspaper is necessary — a thing 
which does not exist on this earth. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO DELEGATION. 

The manner in which the San Francisco delegation applies itself to 
work is deserving of all praise. Probably never has the city been repre- 
sented by a body ot harder working legislators. The number of really 
important measures before them is exceptionally large, yet they are all 
being investigated with a thoroughness that is in the highest degree cred- 
itable. The capacity of the chairman, J. V. Coffey, for work is some- 
thing marvelous, and ia not without its effect for good upon his colleagues. 
He is winning golden opinions from all sides. It is safe to predict for 
him a brilliant future. Mr. Swift is perhaps the ablest man in the dele- 
gation, and San Francisco owes him a debt of gratitude for the practical 
and arduous efforts he is making for her benefit. If his exertions are not 
as successful as every honest man would like to see them, the fault will 
certainly not be at his door. Frank McCoppin, in the Senate, is doing 
good work, and is piling up a large balance to his credit with the people 
of this city, whom ne has so often and so faithfully served. Dr. May is 

E roving himself an unexceptional representative, and for good, square, 
onest voting no man is more to be reUed upon than Mr. Conroy. The 
city is honored in having one of its members, Mr. Anderson, at the head 
of the Judiciary Committee. We do not pretend at this time to award 
to every member of the delegation his exact meed of praise. We simply 
mention certain names in the connection in which they have attracted our 
attention. No doubt others have done well. By the end of the session 
it will be worth while to summarize the whole record, and to give every 
member the benefit of a true showing of his votes and acts. The lobby is 
particularly strong just now, and there are numerous bills under consider- 
ation which appear to have money in them. It will be well for some of the 
members we know if their connection with certain of these measures 
shall at the end of the session admit of investigation. There is a quiet, 
yet intense interest being taken in the doings of the Legislature that will 
ensure a long remembrance for its good or bad deeds. 



' ( Newburg has a lawsuit over a grave. " We shouldn't want to be the 
man that won that suit, unless we could let the grave. 



THE LEGISLATIVE MARKET. 

The state of things at Sacramenlo 

(Woe is me, that I must speak !) 
Is not quite what honest patriots 

From their legislators seek. 
I have heard of base corruption, 

Itching palms, and brazen bribes; 
But the deeds of these men place them 

Beyond the usual diatribes. 
A hand sticks out from every coat-tail, 

Open, waiting for a fee; 
Make it large, or make it trifling, 

As your cause or hopes may be; 
But give something, or turn homeward, 

Gold, gold, gold! is all the cry. 
Reason ? Justice ? Merit? — nonsense! 

If you need a vote — then buy. 
'Tie the Legislative Market — 

Listen to the gavel's blows: 
"Law on schoolbooks? Who bids highest? 

Going — gone. McGuffey goes ! 
Street Improvements! Fine law, genTmen! 

I am offered — who speaks last? — 
I am offered — thank you; take it — 

Passing — passing — passing — Passed !" 
Some things can't be bought, however — 

Season's rather late you know; 
Ask for Honor — what's the answer ? 

"All sold out, sir, long ago." 
Dignity— Good Faith — a Statesman ? 

Such demands create a shock, 
For the Legislative Market 

Never keeps such trash in stock. 
Sell away ! Bring down your gavels ! 

Every blow shall drive a nail 
In the coffin of the nation 

That puts up her laws for sale. 
From her soiled, degraded statutes 

Time shall weave her shroud at last, 
Echoing from your lips her death-song: 

" Passing — passing — passing — Passed !" 

GOING FOR EVERYTHING LN SIGHT. 

Everything there is money in, is under review just now in Sacra- 
mento. Some of the proposals are excellent, others are extremely doubt- 
ful, whilst many are altogether bad. The difficulty of discriminating be- 
tween these, and in selecting the good from bad, must be a task beyond 
the power of individual representatives to accomplish. The crowd of 
business is immense, and no one man can hope to master it all, and deal 
with it understandingly. A list of interests involved would be a long one. 
To begin with, there are three pretentious Railroad bills, introduced by 
high old Commissioners, who have taken two years to prepare them, and 
yet expect legislators to comprehend their intricacies, and clothe them 
with the form of law within a few weeks. We don't believe the thing 
will be done. Then there is a bill by Searles to regulate the stock- broking 
business, which looks as if it might be a good measure, but needs most 
careful examination. The public schools and all their belongings are un- 
der review. The school-book question is up for settlement. It is pro- 
posed to give §100 a month to School Directors, and generally to remodel 
the Department. The Water Company is under fire, and seems to be 
squelching it only too successfully, by turning on a golden stream. The 
Gas Company is being troubled as to the quality and price ot its gas. 
The police are the subject of much attention. It looks as if their lobby 
would keep their pay up to its present figure, and as if the present Com- 
missioners would remain to manipulate affairs in the future, as they have 
in the past, with the advantage of a greatly increased number of men to 
handle. The Board of Supervisors is to be increased, and something like 
the old ward system is to be resorted to in future elections. Every office 
in the city is to be affected by a Reduced Salary bill. The Fire Depart- 
ment is also under review. A boulevard to the Park, through private 
property, is to be opened. Street railroads are asking for additional pow- 
ers, whilst there are propositions to give them less, and already their fares 
have been wisely reduced. Savings Banks are to be regulated by a Com- 
missioner acting under new and important legal powers. One bank is to 
be brought to book about its large reserve fund clipped from the deposi- 
tors' earnings. Insurance companies are to have a new deal. The mining 
debris question is to exercise the miners, whilst the Fence law is to agi- 
tate the farmers. Ex-Tax Collectors and administrators of public estates 
are to pay all coin in their hands into the pubUc treasury, where it be- 
longs, and their bondsmen are to be relieved of liability in respect of the 
amount so paid in. That is undoubtedly right, but we might proceed to 
lengths interminable. Enough has been shown to indicate how vast the 
interests are that are being subjected to a kind of legislative crucifixion. 
Many of these matters will bear dealing with in detail hereafter. The air 
is thick with rumors about this and that scheme being likely to pass, not 
because of merit, but because of money. If half be true, there will be 
some startling revelations ere long. 

THE RIGHT THING TO DO. 

A petition, most influentially signed by citizens in the East, has been 
presented to Congress, praying for what may be called the only honest and 
rational mode of making silver a legal tender, and that is for the appoint- 
ment of an International Commission, having power to determine and 
promulgate authoritatively from time to time the relative value of silver 
and gold, so that in the payment of debts, at home and abroad, the quan- 
tity of coined silver which shall be the equivalent of any given quantity 
of gold coin may be everywhere definitely acknowledged; and until such 
a Commission shall be appointed, the creation of machinery by Congress 
for ascertaining and promulgating, at intervals of three months, the value 
of Bilver in gold, as determined by the average sales of silver at the prin- 
cipal centers of commerce east and west of the Rocky Mountains. In 
other words, they ask for one standard and two legal tenders. We know 
of no objection to this plan on its merits, and we can anticipate no an- 
swer to it from the silver men, except " Goldites," "Gold-bugs," "Gold 
sharps," " Shylocks," "Mississippi Valley," and so on. 



i», i87a 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



9 



THE TOWN CRIER. 

Mr ih» Cri»r Wh»t th» d»rtl »rt iho«r 

q« tl>»t will pl&j II, • d»Ttl. »ir. with »oa." 



W 



it Uit *■ Ion* U ft lUil, 



Gen. McComb. ■ upon to uy - tiding the re- 

itude of reedi- 

ucm. W ro n( Crwdmoor came to town, they were also in mi 

■ ffinom. When they were beseeching the Legislature to 

pport to* militia, they nn in an attitude 

In fait, the annals 'I" iint record the 

not in an attitude of IllSllillfl— BtlL * bat tin- denre- 

would ' lieiu if. by iuituo ab-nrd stroke of fortune or mis- 

this attitude were disturbed, and they wen' called into action ? 

't'ul picture to the contemplation <>f the Gei 

n. Hut growler* have been heard ti> say that every 

! them won!. I pel iiaralysia of the dexter finger tin* first time 

It is consoling t>» think that their rifles may be with- 

pen. Mo one knows otherwise* 

The Rev. Father Gallagher is Lending his assistance to the organiza- 
tion of ■ To tety, which is to be known under the euphonic 
i The Order of the Sacred Thirst. His assistance is a men matter 
of patmnaiff. and >'■■ ad to the signing of the pledge. If, how- 
ever, the reverend gentleman oould consent to the reduction of the 
ful rotundity which distinguishes htm, by ro signing, he might mure 
rva'lilr be brought to a realization of the vailed irony which marks the 
be has given t" the new order. Very Reverend Father, do not yon 
think "the Order of a hfoet Damnable Thirst" would oonveya more vivid 
-inn of the feelings which animate the unhappy pledge-signer when 
his lively companions are reTeling in the antics of a wake, or the domes- 
f a Saturday night spree. 

Mrs. Dr. French wants to know what we shall teach our girls. We 
might teach them that poverty is the best policy; that short dresses are 
more becoming than long ones; that Beecner was Innocent; that 
brokers are respectable, temperate and well conducted husbands and 
fathers; that Kearny street offers signal disadvantages as a promenade; 
that the " Bloom of Youth " does not compare with a good natural brown 
sunburn; that baking, sveepmg and hemstitching are coming into fashion 
once more. Hut, la! it would take several centuries to make thera believe 
all this, and there is DO necessity, after all, for cramming them with such 
flagrant untruths. In point of fact, we can teach our girls nothing that 
they don't know. The real question is, What next shall we permit our 
girls to teach US? 

A Newport, R. I., paper says : " Mr. George Norman, of this city, 
has contracted to furnish the city of San Fraucisco with a supoly of pure 
water. The contract price is about *16,000,000." While the feeble mind 
will possibly stagger before Mr. Norman's stupendous confidence in his 
own resources, it is to be hoped that, before we finally determine upon 
entering into negotiations, there will be left sufficient self-possession to 
ask that a sample be sent on. Also, we should like to know if the supply 
is to come on, or if pipes are to be laid between this place and Rhode Isl- 
and ? It would be as well, also, to lay an injunction on all further tap- 
ping in that State. Dropsy is capricious in its symptoms, and it would 
be awkward if the old reservoir should land here as high and dry as a San 
Rafael shrimp. 

Chief Scannell is out on the streets once more, having recovered from 
his latest fracture— a collar bone this time. A young man with " a head 
for fingers " has been diligently engaged in making an estimate of the 
number ot fractures this gallant fireman has sustained, and computes it 
that every bone in his body, with one solitary exception, has been shat- 
tered to fragments and pieced together again. This exception is one of 
the small bones of the foot, and has probably escaped the fate of the 
others on account of its being already a mere fragment. The entire 
structure of the fragile Scannell may therefore be said to be built on this 
one little bit of solid basis. How fearfully and wonderfully we are made, 
to be sure! 

A workingman came very near suffering the terrible disgrace of ex- 

Sulsion from his club, for having committed the heinous crime of walking 
own street, cheek by jowl, with Gildea of the Assembly. While opinions 
may differ a3 to the punishment which should expiate such an offence, 
the clear-eyed can but see in Kearney's high-handed disapproval a symp- 
tom of the most rabid jealousy of the rival orator. Now, therefore, let 
them fall to; and while the remorseless Kearney shall run over Gildea 
with a draught horse, the deft Gildea shall transfix Kearney with a stitch 
in his side. Thus shall a hungry jealousy be appeased, and the skill of 
craft assert itself. 

A predatory Indian, while seeking to earn an honest livelihood up 
country, the other day, violently possessed himself of all the property 
appertaining to a Chinaman, and finished by robbing him of his queue. 
The Chinaman, in a spirit of playful retaliation, attempted to steal a march 
upon his foe and rob him of the characteristic of his race. He found it 
to be native dirt, but it had stuck so long that John could not approach 
near enough to capture it, either with a land grant or a forty-foot house. 
Thus does that Indian resist the march of the proud invader and assert 
his right to his native soil, by carrying it on his body in liberal profusion. 
McCoppin, the man of many bills, has been sat upon in solemn con- 
clave by the Board of Education, and disapproved of. While it may be 
arch treason to disagree with these learned gentlemen; there are yet 
features to this bill which strongly recommend its passage. If it be im- 
possible to make it pass in its present form, the intellect of McCoppin 
might be brought to bear upon it in such a way as to make it read: "A 
bill providing for the introduction of the English language in the public 
schools of San Francisco." This would leave nothing to do but to scratch 
around and find some one capable of teaching it. 

An Oakland correspondent of the JBvcninf/ Bulletin tersely remarks: 
" The Berkeley Hotel is closed for want of a landlord." On this side the 
bay it is the custom to close a hotel for want of guests. Such appurte- 
nances to a hotel, however, are unknown on the right side of the bay. 
The whole affair is carried on in that country with a landlord, a landlord's 
wife, and a Chinaman. The wife generally elopes with one of the dea- 
cons, the Chinaman burglarizes and is clapped into jail, and the landlord 
fails. The correspondent's item is an epitome which the romancist may 
fill out at pleasure. 



The following earefulK 
fully added to toe number already floating through the paper* We are 

Lit will be new to our readers: Winn the d 
youth he resided at the corner of Twenty ninth street and Broadway, 

rk. and wu I r his skill in base-ball and watai 

One day, while playing an aooordioo for a wager, he observed the ap- 
proach of a runaway borse attached to ■ carriage, in which was ■ beautt- 

lid woman. It was " but the work of a moment" for him to bound 
Ughtly OUt upon the awning, from thenee to a tree -box, from thence to a 

lamp-post! and from thenee to the roof of the vehicle. This done, hi 

'■ tail, and lifted his hind legs oil the ground. 
The maddened animal ran a few mflea on bis front feet and fainted. 
With a loud shriek the lady threw hersslf into the arms of her young 

er. She proved to be the foster father of Hie present mother of tho 

Austrian Emperor: and t bus was happily inaugurated that amiable friend- 
ship between the Grand Duke and his nephew, so pleasantly conspiouous 
in the death of Victor Emmanuel. Her sister still relates the above ln< 
aidant with emotion. fTbere seentB to be something mixed, as it were, in 
the above. However, its just like all the rest.— AW. JV. L,\ 

Mr. William Mestayer, the alleged actor and admitted practical 
jokiat, became so excited at the reports of game near Marysville that he 
determined to run down and have a day's shooting. That plausible young 
fraud, Lewis Harrison, amiably offered to help him load cartridges, and 
when a hundred had been prepared Mestayer started for the train. That 
evening he was detected by Harrison in the act of coming out of the I lalir 
fornia Market, wearing a somewhat humbled expression and bearing a 
suspiciously antique looking string of quail. "Did you shoot those, 
Billy?" said H. naively. " I did," cheerfully responded M. "You did, 
eh ?* continued the former, looking the imperturbable sportsman full in 
the eye. " I did, every individual feather," reiterated the gentleman, 
whose unfaltering assurance is the wonder and pride of our local Thespi- 
ans. "Then," rejoined Harrison impressively, you must have gotten in- 
fernally close on to them, for I didn't put a single grain of shot in 
all those cartridges — just filled 'em up with wads ana rammed 'em down, 
that's all." " May I be paralyzed forever if I don't shoot, you on the 
spot !" mared Mestayer, partially dragging the cover off his gun. " What 
with — wads ?" said Harrison calmly. So, instead of blood, they wound 
up on beer. 

A weekly contemporary throws an amount of pathetic originality 
into itB struggles to secure advertising that is positively touching. In a circu- 
lar letter, altered to suit in this instance ashirtraaker, it says: "We circulate 
0,000 copies among a class of rich and intelligent people, all of whom 
would wear shirts did you advertise your excellent make in our columns." 
To force 6,000 people into adopting the novel and extraordinary habit of 
wearing shirts, is an achievement to boast of. Such a paper ought to re- 
vive trade of itself. 

A chemist's apprentice in Alameda was requested to put up a bit's 
worth of paregoric for a lady, the other day, but, by a trifling error, sub- 
stituted morphine, which killed the female's baby. Now, the latter drug 
was worth a dollar at wholesale rates, but instead of keeping quiet and 
getting seven bits ahead of the druggist, this*absurd parent is making the 
deuce of a row over the incident. She probably relies upon inducing the 
apothecary to throw in a cake of toilet soap and a stiff tooth-brush. 

Whenever a boarder leaves the Palace Hotel without settling up, 
the book-keeper puts " Dom Pedro " at the head of the bill, and sends it 
down to Brazil by the next mail. That benevolent old potentate always 
remits promptly, under the impression that it is for some little matter 
overlooked during his stay here. We suppose there will be war between 
the two countries in consequence of this item, but our duty must be done 
though the heavens fall. Besides, the Dom is a subscriber. 

The boa- cons trie ter at Woodward's has been specially engaged to 
play the " Devil" in the Eden act of The Deluge, now in preparation at 
the California Theater. We are always glad to hear of the success of 
deserving professionals, these hard times, and we hope the property apple 
won't slip down the wrong way and choke this popular and efficient 
snake. Come to think of it, though, snakes haven't any wrong way, 

A farmer residing near Vallejo sold his farm a few weeks ago for $16,- 
000, and started with the proceeds for this city, his intention being to 
invest the same in Alta. On the way down he got drunk and was robbed. 
He was at first very much incensed against the thieves, but recently has 
become more reconciled, and philosophically remarks that he'd "just as 
leave the poor devils should have the money as Seth Cook." 

Mrs. Beecher Hooker sarcastically inquires why the figure of Min- 
erva, the goddess of wisdom, is placed on the top of the Capitol at Wash- 
ington. We don't mind telling Mrs. H., on condition that it goes no far- 
ther. The statue in question is an extremely valuable one, and is placed 
in that position for the same reason the goblets are chained to the water- 
coolers in the halls beneath. 

The other day Victor Emmanuel died, and now the Pope has gone, 
too. It requires occasional little warnings like these to remind us to 
wear our rubbers down town these wet days. We had a slight cold last 
month, and who knows but our obituary is now standing on the gallies of 
a thousand newspaper offices, ready for any contingency. We must be 
more careful. 

Some "old resident" writes to the Bulletin to inquire how that 
paper stands on the present absorbing question, " Is there a hell?" This 
is a peculiarly gratutious piece of impertinence. Has even the oldest res- 
ident ever seen anything in Mr. Pickering's course that evinced any dread 
of a hereafter? 

Will the "eternal California summer" editors please inform us 
why it is that a family's coal bill costs more than its rent in this locality 
and time of the year ? Speak out, gentlemen. 

Kearney has gone down to San Jose for a weeks' speechifying, and 
the first thing we know we will be abused for a cold-blooded attempt to 
depreciate San Jose real estate. 

Stanley's African name is " Little Man with Much Face." He be- 
gan life as an insurance agent, and the scent of the roses hangs round him 
still. 

Nowtbat Constantinople is taken, let us be on the lookout to shoot 
down the first miscreant vocalist who attempts to revive the song of that 
name. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Feb. 9, 1878. 



A RETURN. 

" Do ye not know me, Donald ?" 

Pushing back her gray hair — 
" Can ye not speak to me, Donald — 

Me who was once so fair ? 
Many years have gone over us — 

Fortunate years for thee ; 
When I see thee they seem not so many — 

Only when thou seest me. 
For I wear the snow of winters 

No sun and no summer can change j 
Xet seem to hear the spring coming, 

And the bluebird beginning to range. 
As when in the old days together 

We wandered and talked by the stream, 
Of thy life in the far new country, 

And our love. Was it all a dream ? 
For what could I be to thee, Donald, 

A man grown to honor and land, 
With a choice of the whole world before thee, 

While could I give thee but my hand! 
'Twas long that I staid by the brook-side, 

In the dews and the dark of the eve, 
Through winter and summer thereafter, 

Ere I could forget to grieve. 
For thou wast my first love, Donald — 

Thou the first love of my heart ; 
Why should I not tell thee, Donald, 

What sadness it was then to part." 
" I cannot recall thee, woman ; 

And yet, when I hear thy voice, 
I hear the low rippling river j 

I see the girl of my choice. 
Can ye not tell me of Janet, 

Something of her I once loved ? 
She gave me a wing for my bonnet ; 

I gave her a ring ere I roved." 
" Think ye on her sometimes, Donald ? 

Can ye remember the ring ? 
It is worn now very thin, Donald ; 

Yet perhaps ye'll remember the thing. 
It is here on my hand still, Donald ; 

I cannot remove it again ; 
I have kept it through labor and sorrow ; 

It is grown now a part of my pain! " 

— Harpers' Magazine for February. 

THE ORDER OF THE CROWN OF 
INDIA. 
The ' ' Spectator " concludes a severely satir- 
ical article thus: We have been accustomed to 
think that our duty to India was our duty to her 
laboring millions, and not to her mushroom 
Princes — there is only one conspicuous Prince out 
of Rajyootana who is not new — that their acqui- 
escence, secured by justice and honesty, was our 
first guarantee — except, indeed, the sword, whose 
wielders it is now etiquette to pass over silently 
— and this new India, this land of fire-works, 
and processions, and spangles, and Princes with 
stars, and Viceroys with dreamily poetic speech- 
es, is to us so unknown that we hesitate even to 
hold, much less to pronounce, an opinion. Per- 
haps it is as well. Perhaps India should be gov- 
erned by comedians, with parts sketched out for 
them for an Oriental novelist, and hear her fate 
from time to time in rhythmical periods, pro- 
nounced while a grand transparency goes up, 
and decorated figurantes dance applause ; but, if 
so, the world is a feebler place and a worst place 
than the most pessimist philosopher has as yet 
ventured to imagine. And, if so, India does not 
require the services of English statesmen. Let 
us hand it over at once to those to whom it be- 
longs — to Boucicault, and Burnand, and Bever- 
ley, and the heir of Telbin's brush. 

A Parisian journal contains a curious para- 
graph about the preparations of the French beg- 
gars and pickpockets for their campaign duriug 
tbe Exhibition season of 1878. The ranks of the 
latter, it declares, are principally recruited from 
England ; but the former are almost exclusively 
national, and possess an organization of their 
own which the police, in spite of municipal im- 
provements, driving them out of their old quar- 
ters, have never been able to break through. But 
sufficient's known to distinguish the places of 
their origin, the slang they employ, the particular 
branches of the profession to which they are at- 
tached, and even in many instances their person- 
al histories. It was thought that, under the 
Empire, mendicancy had been more or less sup- 
pressed, and in some of the departments— as 
that of the Lower Seine, for example — no doubt 
it was practically extinguished. In Paris, how- 
ever, no small class of the public absolutely fa- 
vors these impostors of the pavement: the nor- 
mal parents of large starving families —borrowed; 
the burnt-out sufferers ; the returned pilgrims 
from Lourdes or Rome, ruined in a worldly sense 



by their piety; the men always naked in winter, 
and sunstricken in summer. Our Parisian con- 
temporary speaks of the quarter especially af- 
fected by this army of gens heureux as "the 
Gilded City," and refers to the varieties of "com- 
merce " it carries on. It runs to open carriage 
doors ; it haunts the colonnades of the Opera ; it 
pretends to sell flowers, laces, and cigar-lights ; 
it produces certificates of misfortune ; and it has 
acquired the art of looking instead of asking for 
alms. To suppress it, we are told, there must be 
a law to prohibit giving, as well as soliciting. A 
story is related, which the Jew Apella may be- 
lieve or not, as he pleases, about a sham blind 
man, whose station was opposite the Hotel Gon- 
taut, and who gave his daughter a dowry of 
twenty thousand francs. At any rate, the Pari- 
sian organ affirms that a popular blind beggar, 
if not too old and disreputable, is considered no 
undesirable match for an ordinary work-girl, and 
it therefore warns the coming multitude of 
strangers against these artifices of roguery. As 
for the pickpockets, it adds: " remember the 
thousands of empty purses found beneath the 
flooring of the International Exhibition in the 
Champ de Mars." 



A notable figure in American naval life 
drops out in the death of E. K. Collins, founder 
of the line of steamships that once bore his name. 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD. 

NOETHEEN DIVISION. 

WINTER ARRANGEMENT. 

(lomnienciug Monday, Oct. 22*1, 1877, 
J Passenger Trains will leave San Francisco from Pas- 
senger Depot on Townsend street, between Third and 
Fourth streets, as follows : 

8 f\ a.m (daily) for San Jose, Gilroy, Hollister, Tres 
• fJ\J pinos, Pajaro, Salinas. Soledad and all Way 
Stations, making Stage cimnections at San Mateo for 
Half Moon Bay and Pescadero ; at Redwood for Wood- 
side, Searsville and Pescadero ; at San Jose for Los 
Gatos and Lexington ; at Gilroy for Los Banos and Fire- 
baugh's ; at Sargent's for San Juan and Natividad; at 
Soledad for Paraiso Springs, Paso Robles Hot Springs, 
San Luis Obispo, Guadalupe, Santa Barbara, San Buen- 
aventura and Los Angeles. 

g^F 3 At Pa.tako connects with the Santa Cruz Rail- 
road for Aptos and Santa Cruz. 



11.25 



A M. (daily) for Menlo Park and Way Sta- 



> O £C p.m. daily (Sundays excepted) for San Jose, 
y.AO Gilroy and Way Stations. 



4.40 



p.m. (daily) for San Jose and Way Stations. 



£* Q(\ p.m. (daily) for Menlo Park and Way Stations. 



g^~ Extra train on Sundays discontinued. 

A. C. BASSETT, Superintendent. 
H. R. JUDAH, Assistant Passenger and Ticket Agent. 



SOUTHERN DIVISIONS. 

£^~ Passengers for points on the Southern Divisions 
of the road will take the cars of the Central Pacific Rail- 
road via OAKLAND, leaving SAN FRANCISCO via Ferry 
Landing, Market street, at 4:00 p.m. daily, and making 
close connection at GOSHEN for Sumner, Mojave, Los 
Angeles, Wilmington, Anaheim, Colton & Colorado River. 



C. P. R. R. 



Commencing Wednesday, Jan. 9, 1878, and until 
further notice, Trains and Boats will Leave S. F: 

Overland Ticket Office, at Ferry Landing;, Market street. 



7 00 A - M ' ( dr " lv >- Vallejo Steamer (from Market 
1 -VKJ street Lauding: — Conneetintr witb Trains for 
Napa (Stages for Sonoma), Calistoga (the Geysers), 
Woodland, Williams, Kniffht's Landing; and Sacramento. 
(Sundaj-s excepted) for Woodland, Williams and 
Knight's Landing. (Arrive Sau Francisco 8:10 p.m.) 



Q AA A.M. (daily), Atlantic Express Train (via Oak- 
l u.\J\J ] an d Ferry) for Sacramento, Marysville, Red- 
ding, Portland (Or.), Colfax, Reno (Virginia City), Pali- 
sade (Eureka), Ogden and Omaha. Connects at Gait 
with train arriving at lone at 3:10 p.m. 

(Arrive San Francisco 5:35 P.M.) 



Q QA A.M. (Sundays excepted) Northern Railway Lo- 
t/ " t '*-' cal Passenger Train to San Pablo and Martinez. 
(Arrive San Francisco 3:35 P.M.) 



3AA P.M. (daily) San Jose Passenger Train (via Oak 
•*-'*-' land Ferry), stopping at all Way Stations. Ax 
rives at San Jose at 5:30 P.M. 
(Arrive San Francisco 9 :35 A. m. ) 



€J O A P.M. (daily) Northern Railway Local Passenger 
«• « V Train to San Pablo and Martinez. 

(Arrive San Francisco 9:35 a.m.) 



4 A A P.M. (daily) Express Train (via Oakland Ferry), 
'*->\J for Lathrop, Stockton, Merced, Visalia, Sum- 
ner, Mojave, Newhall, San Buenaventura, Santa Barbara- 
Los Angeles, "Santa Monica," Wilmington, Santa Ana, 
San Diego, Colton and Yuma (Arizona Stages and Colo, 



rado River Steamers). Connects at Niles with train ar- 
riving at San Jose at 6:55 p.m. " Sleeping Cars " between 
Oakland, Los Angeles and Yuma. 
(Arrive San Francisco 12:40 p.m.) 

4AA P. M. (Sundays excepted) Vallejo Steamer (from 
• W Market Street Lauding), connecting with trains 
for Calistoga, (the Geysers), Woodland, Knight's Land- 
ing and Sacramento; and at Sacramento with Passen- 
ger Train, leaving at 9:15 p.m. on Tuesdays, Thursdays 
and Saturdays only, for Truckee, Reno, Carson and 
Virginia City. "Sleeping Cars" between Vallejo and 
Carson. (Arrive San Francisco 11:10 a.m.) 



4AA P.M. (Sundays excepted) Sacramento Steamer 
.\J\J (from Wash'n St. Wharf), for Beniciaand Land- 
ings on the Sacramento River; also, taking the third class 
overland passengers to connect with train leaving Sacra- 
meuto at 9:00 A.M., daily. (Arrive San Francisco 8:00 p.m. 

4 9|| P.M. (daily), Through Third Class and Accom- 
• OvF modation Train, via Lathrop and Mohave, 
arriving at Los Angeles on second day at 11:55 A.M. 
(Arrive San_Francisco 7:30^. M. 



FERRIES AND LOCAL TRAINS. 



Front "SAST FBAXCISCB," Daily. 



A 7.00 
7.30 
8.00 
8.30 
9.00 
9.30 
10.00 
10.30 
11.00 
11.30 
12.00 
P12.30 
1.00 
1.30 
2.00 



A 6.10 
VII. 45 



P 3.00 
3.30 
4.00 
4.30 
5.00 
5.30 
6.00 
6.30 
7.00 
8.10 
9.20 
10.30] 



A 7.00 
8.00 
9.00 
10.00 
11.00 
12.00 
p 1.30 
2.00 
" 3.00 
4.00 
5.00 
6.00 



'•11.45 



» 
a ■ 



A 7., 
8.30 
9.30 
10.30 
11.30 
P12. 
1.00 



tar; 



wEp 



A 8.00 
(9.30 
Ptl.00 
3.00 
4.00 
t8.10 



tS>.30: 

■ 3.00 

4.00 

jS.10 



4.30 
5.30 
6.30 
7.00 

8.10ltChangeCars 
9.201 
10.30 



. !p'7.Q0 a 6.10 ) DAILY, ( 

! »8.10 P 11.45 \ SUNDAYS ■ 
J EXCEPTED ( 



8.30 
9.30 
10.30 
11.30 
p 1.00 
4.00 
5.00 
6.00 



^r 1 



10.00 
p 3.00 




A 0.10 
p 0.00 



♦10.30 P.M. Sundays only to Alameda. 
To FERNSIDE— except Sundays — 7.00, 9.00, 
A.M., and 5 p.m. 
To SAN JOSE— Daily— t9:30 A.M., 3:00, 4:00 P.M. 



To " SAST FRANCISCO," Daily. 


1=1 


a 

MO 


> 

> 3 

ll 

o 

> 


a. 


«?3 

5fc§ 
fco„ 


o 

Re- 

a 


FROM 
OAKLAND. 
(Broadway.) 


A S.OO 
10.00 

p 3.00 
4.30 
5.30 


A 7.30 
8.30 
9.30 
10.30 
1130 
P 1.00 
4.00 


A*6.25 
7.00 
8.03 
9,00 
10.03 
11.03 


At6.45 

7.55 

11.15 

tll.45 

P 3.40 


At7.03 
8.15 
11.35 
PJ120S 
4.03 
t4.45 


A 6.40|A 6.50 
7.40 7.20 
8.401 7.50 
9.40J 8.25 
10.40 8.50 
11.401 9.20 
p 12.40| 9.50 


p 2.50 
3.20 
3.50 
4.20 
4.50 
5.20 
5.50 








6.25 


I 6.00 


3.00 
•3.20 
4.00 
5.00 
6.03 
*10.00 






2.40 
4.40 
5.40 
6.40 
7.50 
9.00 
10.10 


10.50 
11.20 
11.50 
1-12.20 
12 50 
1.20 
1.50 


6.50 






. 


v , 




Change Cars 

at 
West Uaklnd. 


tChange Cars 

at 
East Oakland 


10.20 


A 6.30 


A 5.40 


A-5.00 
*5.40 

p*7.20 
■8.30 


1 /a 5.1o'a 5.20 


















) EXCF 


PTED (. 


1 





From FERNSIDE— except Sundays— 8.00, 10.00, 11.00 

A.M., and 6.00 P.M. 

FROM SAN JOSE— Daily— 7:05 and 8:10 A.M. 

♦Alameda Passengers change cars at Oakland. 

A — Morning, p — Afternoon. 

The Creeb Ferry Boat will Bun Daily: 

From SAN FRANCISCO, at 7:15 and 9:45 A.M , 12:15, 
2:25, and 4:10 p.m. 

From OAKLAND, at S:15, and 10:45 a.m., 1:15, 3:15 
and 5:00 p.m. 

"Official Schedule Time " furnished by Anderson & 
Randolph, Jewelers, 101 and 103 Montgomery St., S. F. 
T. H. GOODMAN, Gen. Pass, and Ticket Agt. 
A. N. Towne, General Superintendent. 



CTOA.RD LINE. 

British and Sforth American Boyal 
Mail Steamships between NEW YORK and LIV- 
ERPOOL, calling at QUEENSTOWN. 
Sailing- from New York every "Wednesday 

BATAVIA Jan. 30th, March 6th. 

ABYSSINIA Feb. 0th, April 3d 

PAUTHIA Feb- 13th, March 20th 

CHINA Feb, 20th, March 27th 

SCYTH1A Fob. 27th 

ALGERIA March 13th 

BOTHNIA April 10th 

Passage can be secured and all information given on 
application to 

WILLIAMS, BLANCHARD & CO., 
Feb. 9. 218 California st. 



' 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



11 



Notabilia. 



to an et 



A lady, .»■• vi r ber artistic uHlitus iu» for her want of 

lit |»:irtii-ii]»r ntnr " 
n which OM |i 
* "wanted" By Mr- I*-. « solicitor, who wu inxlotu 
i d oould not ba inter* 
Mr. P.. therefore, look a stage-box en the pit-tier, ami when 
the linly had i itcil air, lit- gallantly threw to her a 

beautiful bonouet which had figured in front ->f hi* box. Tin? lady took 
nd amued graciously npon her admirer. NeetUng in thenowera 
was a note. Was it a biiht ->l.mj ' The lady slowly drew it forth. She 
■ a tender of a heart an<t hand. It oomn 
irted back, for her name was not Victoria. The ads- 
to the artistt. It bore a seal, but not of lly 
n»-n. i ■ La writ. The lady Created the matter aaa theatrical 

joke. The Court of Queen's Bench "li«l not. Judgment was obtained, 
lady was arrested m she was leaving the theater with her weekly 
titer by her side. She was taken to asponging-house. 
La to appear in one of her best parts. A gallant no- 
bleman, hearing oi what had occurred, came to the rescue, ami, providing 
himself with sovereigns, obtained her release. No one, under the circum- 
stances, could have done more. — Truth. 



The young King of Spain was greatly deliphted on the occasion of 
his marriage, at the receipt of ■ present from California, It consisted of 
i Landsberger*a Grand Prize Champagne and a barrel of Gierke 
Wine. Two days afterward, Mr. Landsberger received the following 
m at his place of bnsmeas, 10 ami 12 Jones Alley: " DeaB LandT— 
Them Champagne was jes nifty; nicest thing I ever struck. Old woman's 
reg'largone on the Gerke. Am as happy as a clam. — : Yrs., ALFOHBO." 

Singular, ain't it, that when a man gives his wife a dime to buy a box 
of hairpins, or a gam-ring for the baby, it looks about seven times as big 
H when he planks it down for a little bitters for the stomach's sake. 
There is no place where men BO willingly plank down their coin for value 
t Swain's Bakery, 213 Sutter street, above Kearny. Their 
are the most elegant and reasonable in price in the city; and all 
our ladies know it. Remember Swain's Original Bakery. 

Profession and Practice. — "Professor Agassiz has recently estimated 
that a man's finger-naiis will grow to be 3,000 feet long if he leaves them 
uncut for 1,000 years." The next to discover is, how long a man's nose 
will become in half the time if he keeps poking it into business that 
d< esn|t concern him and cannot be of the least use to the world in gen- 
eral. Will Professor Agassiz kindly say ? 



' ' Marian! Marian! please slet me in! " said a man to bis wife, who 
was looking out of the window watching him trying to open the door with 
a toothpick. " Iah tread on my key and it'sh all flattened out." " That's 
what comes of drinking common saloon whisky," murmured Maria, as 
she came down stairs, "and I've got a gallon of F. & P. J. Cassin's finest 
Golden Plantation Whisky in the closet, which would not hurt him a bit." 
Thi3 is true, and the firm's address is 523 Front street. 



The theory is fast gaining ground that old Mr, Lord and bis new 
spouse sought a place of concealment as soon as married, to decide the 
all-important question which should get up first in the morning to build 
the Hies and do the marketing. If they only get a Union Range from 
De La Montanya, it will be a pleasure for either of them to cook break- 
fast or dinner on it. The happy couple are informed that De La Mon- 
tanya's store is on Jackson street, below Battery. 

It is very annoying to offer a lady an opera glass, and discover that 
it is of no use to her on account of defective glasses. To avoid this, go 
to Muller's, and make your purchase. If you want spectacles, he will 
give you just the kind you require. 

"Jane is getting very high-toned lately," said young Brown to a 
friend as Miss Smith passed him without a bow. " You do her an in- 
justice," replied Jones, " she is so obsorbed in happiness she sees no one 
now. Her father has just given her a Hallet & Davis Piano, a perfect 
instrument, bought from Badger, 13 Sansome street." "Ah, that accounts 
for it," said Brown j " make any one happy! " 



"Wilt marry me," said he to she. 
To say " yes " trying to goad her; 
" No," says she, "we'll single be, 
For I don't like the odor 



Of gin and rum, and whisky some 
On your breath. It don't bode a 
Happy end. Though I might bend 
If you'd drink Napa Soda." 
He took the pledge, and married her like a little man. 

There is a great deal of truth in the statement of a contemporary that 
when a man fails in business people say he has " gone up ;" but you never 
hear his creditors make that assertion when they attend his obsequies. 
No man who has ever " goue up "in Bradley & Rulofson's elevator to 
have bis photograph taken, ever came down discontented. This is a fact; 
the first part of this article is all rot. 

Heller has a new coffee-and-milk trick, and the creme de la creme of 
society who flock to his mystic manifestations, enjoy this kind of coffee- 
cup-and- sorcery. — Puck. 

Two thousand Milwaukeeans have signed the pledge and eased 
their Wisconsciences, and a great many Californians have done the same 
with Pacific intentions. Water is a good onough beverage if you only 
filter it first. There is only one filter in the world, and that is the Rili- 
cated Carbon Filter, sold by David Bush, New Montgomery street, under 
the Grand Hotel. 

Joaquin Miller wants to be cremated after death. But Beecher says 
there's no such place. Yes there is such a place, too. David Bush, 27 
and 29 Montgomery street, the celebrated gas-fitter, has invented a new 
burner which will cremate Joaquin Miller in 10 minutes. When you are 
ready, Joaquin, give him a call, or for anything else in the same line. 



Wholesale Grocers. 



REMOVAL. 

L II WWW.] NEWTON BROTHERS & CO., [Morris Nbwtok. 

Importer* nml « ltol<'<ml<> <I<miUt* In Tens, Foreign (Jomlnnnd 
ive NUOVwl Id :ii 



Ifonua. 



June 7. 



Nkwto.i Booth, C. T. Wiikeler, Sacramento. | J. T. QbOTUt, W. W. Do dub, S. F 

W. W. DODGE & CO., 
Amriio|f»nlo Grocer*, corner Front nnd CIny streets, Naa 






April 1 



TABER, HARKER & CO., 



Successor** to I'lifllips. Tuber A < '<•., Importers and Wholesale Oro- 
oara, 108 ind L10 California street, below Front, San Frandsoo. April 15. 



AGENT FOR DTJPONTS GUNPOWDER, 

Winchester Repeating Arms and Ammunition, take Superior and Fa. 

cine Safety Fuse. 

Diipont's Superior Mining and Blasting- Powder, manufac- 
tured expressly for California; Cannon, Musket and Sporting- Powder; the 
celebrated Diamond Grain and Ragle Duck, No. "a l, 2 and 3 ; liable Uifle, Dupont'a 
Fg, FFg and FFFg, in kegs, half kegs, quarter kegs and canisters of £ pound and 1 
pound. Winchester's (Henry's Improved) Repeating Rifles, Rifled Muskets, Carbines 
and Fixed Ammunition. Lake Superior and Pacific Safety Fuse— in suitable pack- 
ages for the trade, and warranted not to fail. 

JOHN SKINKER, Agent for the Pacific Coast, 
Jan. 12. 11& Pine street, San Francisco. 

F. C. Snow. J SNOW & MAY'S ART GALLERY. [W. B. iUr. 

SNOW A MAY, 

IMPORTERS AND MANUFACTURERS OP 

Pictures, Frames, moldings, and Artists* Materials. 

21 Kearny St., near Market, S. F. Dec. 19. 



JOYCE'S SPORTING AMMUNITION. 

[ESTABLISHED 1820.] 

The attention of Sportsmen is invited to the following 
Ammunition, of the best quality, now in general use throughout England, 
India and the Colonies : Joyce's Treble Waterproof and F 3 Quality Percussion 
Caps; Chemically-prepared Cloth and Felt Gun Wadding; Joyce's Gas-Tight Car- 
tridges, for Pin-fire and Central-fire Breech-loading Guns ; Wire Cartridges, for killing 
game at long distances, and every description of Sporting Ammunition. Sold by 
all gun-makers and dealers in gunpowder. 

FREDERICK JOYCE & CO., Patentees and Manufacturers, 
Dec. 30. 57 Upper Thames street, London. 

THOMAS BAY, 122 AND 124 SUTTER STREET. 

Gas Fixtures, Clocks, Bronzes and Holiday Specialties, in- 
cluding Fan Fire Screens, Brass Andirons and Candlesticks, and a choice selec- 
tion of Bisc Ware. Dec. 8. 



W. Morris. 



J. F. Kennsoy. 



Jos. Schwab. 
MORRIS, SCHWAB & CO, 

Importers and Dealers in Moldings, Frames, Engravings, 
Chromos, Lithographs, Decaleomanie, Wax and Artists' Materials, 21 Post 
street, nearly opposite Masonic Temple, San Francisco. Feb. 4. 

A DEAD SHOT!— 48 OUT OF A POSSIBLE 50! 
tcele's Cough Mixture, a compound of Squills, Senega, 

Anise, and other well-known Vegetable Remedies. Prepared and sold by 
JAMES G. STEELE & CO., Chemists and Apothecaries, 
Nov. 10. No. 316 Kearny street, bet. Pine and Bush, S. F. 

BAGS, TENTS ANB HOSE, 

NEVILLE & CO., 

113 Clay and 114 Commercial Streets, 



S 



San Francisco. 



[May 24. 



BRITISH BENEVOLENT SOCIETY OF CALIFORNIA. 

Attendance, daily, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., by the under- 
signed, to receive subscriptions and donations, and to furnish all information 
relating to the Society. J. P. McCURRJE, Secretary, 

Oct. 23. 730 Montgomery street. 

RUHL BROS., 
522 Montgomery Street, 

Sole Agents for O. H. Mumm A Co., Reims, Champagnes; 
Planat & Co., Cognac, Brandies ; W, & J. Graham & Co., Oporto, Port Wines ; 
M. Moreno Demora, Pto. Sta Maria, Sherries ; E. Anheuser & Co.'s Brewing Associa- 
tion, St. Louis, Lager Beer ; Jules Merman & Co., Bordeaux, Claretsand Sauternes ; 
P. A. Mumm, Frankfort O. M., Hock Wines. Dec. 8. 

CASTLE BROTHERS— [Established, 1850-] 

Importers of Teas and East India Goods, .Nos. 213 and 215 
Front street, San Francisco. Jan. 13. 

NOBLE & GALLAGHER, 

Importers and Dealers in Painters* Materials, House, Sign 
and Fresco Painters, Plain and Decorative Paper-Hangers and Glaziers, No. 438 
Jackson street, between Montgomery and Sansome, San Francisco. Ceilinga and 
Walls Kalsomined and Colored. Jobbing promptly attended to. May 13. 



DanZ. Yost.] 



O 



[E. F. Child, Member S. F. Stock Exchange. 
CHILD & YOST, STOCKBBOKEBS, 

No. 323 Montgomery St. [Jan. 12. 

J. BECHTINGER, M.D., 
f the University of Vienna, lias removed to the southwest 

coiner of GEAKY and DUPONT. Jan. 26. 



T. J. PETT1T & CO.'S 
abel, Show Card, Engraving and Printing Establishment, 

J 528 California street, San Francisco, Cal. July 7. 



F 



NOTICE. 
or the very best photographs go to Bradley A Rulofson's, 

in an Elevator, 429 Montgomery street. Oct. 29. 



PUBLIC ADMINISIBATOB, WILLIAM D00LAN, 

Office, No. 12 Nevada Block. [Dec. 8. 



12 



SAN" FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



— 



Feb. 9, 1878. 



THE UNITED STATES AND MEXICO. 

The relations existing between this country and Mexico are not of that 
cordial character that they should be, considering that they are neighbor- 
ing Republics and that they might mutually derive immense benefits from 
intercourse with one another, were the political and commercial interests 
on a better footing. The apparent obstacles to a friendly feeling between 
the two nations have no real foundation, and might easily be overcome by 
judicious statesmanship, but, unfortunately, an antagonistic section of 
politicians, impelled by those who have selfish ends in view, oppose con- 
ciliatory measures, and would gladly precipitate war with Mexico and the 
acquisition of part of her territory. It is fortunate for us thatsuch coun- 
cils are not likely to prevail The troubles on the borders of the Rio 
Grande are manifestly attributable as much to the lawless acts of the peo- 
ple of Southern Texas as to those on the other side of the river, and it is 
altogether opposed to our ideas of international justice that one nation 
should systematically raid on the people and territory of another power 
with whom they are supposed to be at peace. The non -recognition of 
President Diaz by our Government is a mistake which heretofore has 
tended to enhance existing misunderstandings. He was, it is true, in- 
stalled in office by means of a revolution, but his subsequent peaceful 
election showed that he was legitimately the choice of the people. It 
must not be overlooked that Mr. Lerdo had previously filled the office of 
President for four years, and to this term he was restricted by the Consti- 
tution, and therefore his second election to that office was simply a farce. 
And whilst withholding recognition, our Government have tampered with 
the question by demanding certain concessions. They ask whether, in the 
event of recognition being accorded, our troops may invade Mexico? — 
whether Americans in Mexico will be exempt from furced loans, etc.? To 
all these Diaz has replied, with becoming dignity, that when his Govern- 
ment was recognized, he would then be in a position to state what their in- 
tentions were. If the treaties existing between the United States and 
Mexico say nothing in regard to the mode of repressing the incursions of 
hostile Indians common to both sides of the border, neither do they pro- 
vide as to the means of preventing the depredations of armed bands who 
cross and recross from one territory to the other, and pursue with impunity 
their course of robbery and spoliation. Each Government, it is obvious 
in these cases, is strictly bound to repress such outrages by apprehending 
and punishing those who perpetrate them. Mexico has never for a mo- 
ment denied this responsibility; on the contrary, she has proclaimed her 
duty in the premises, and has omitted no opportunityof fulfilling it to the 
best of her ability, and she expects the United States to do the same when 
depredations are made on her territory. It must be remembered that the 
boundary line between the two countries is one of not only great extent, 
but is in a great measure without population ; that the Mexican army is 
not a large one, and that its services have been required in those central 
points necessary to secure public tranquility; and for this reason it is ob- 
vious that nothing is easier than that marauders should pass and repass 
the Rio Grande without let or hindrance. This they have done repeatedly, 
and hence arose the difficulties between the two countries. A review of 
the action taken by our Government at this point becomes interesting. On 
the 1st of June, last year, the Minister of War addressed a communica- 
tion to General Sherman, stating that in consequence of a report having 
been made by Colonel Shatter, commanding in Texas, in regard to recent 
irruptions of Mexicans and Indians, the President recommended that the 
utmost vigilance should be observed in repressing such raids. Whilst un- 
willing to give offence to Mexico, he was convinced that the invasion of 
the United States by armed men and robbers ought not to be longer tol- 
erated, and that if the Mexican Government persisted in neglecting the 
duty of putting down those disorders, that duty would fall on the Amer- 
ican Government, and would be fulfilled even though it might be necessary 
for U. S. troops to cross the frontier at certain times. Discretionary 
powers were then issued to General Ord to follow these bandits across the 
boundary line, to punish them, and to recover the property they stole from 
citizens of the United States. 

When it was known in Mexico that this order had gone forth, it created 
a profound sensation, and public opinion saw in it nothing less than a di- 
rect threat to the sovereignty of the country, and an invasion of the 
rights of territory which, according to the law of nations, are inviolable. 
The order issued by the President extended not only to those of the ma- 
rauders who sought refuge in Mexican towns and villages, and who were 
therefore amenable to and within reach of Mexican law, but also to the 
savage Indians, who are inhabitants of the desert and are out of the pale 
of civiliaed law. Bj T the 11th Article of the Treaty of Peace, signed at 
Guadalupe Hidalgo in 1818, by which a large part of Mexico was trans- 
ferred to the dominion of the United States, it was provided that the lat- 
ter power should repress the incursions of the savage tribes in the neigh- 
boring territory by chastising, and, if necessary, exterminating the in- 
vaders, and that they should exact restitution for all robberies and out- 
rages. In 1854 the two countries entered into another treaty, in which 
new boundaries were fixed to the two Republics, Mexico ceding another 
slice of her already dismembered territory. In the 2d Article of this 
Treaty she liberated the United States from the obligations they had con- 
tracted by the terms of the 11th Article of the Treaty of Guadalupe. 
This was because the Americans, notwithstanding their numerical supe- 
riority, considered themselves unable, except at a great cost, to fulfill the 
stipulations they had entered into. But when the Mexican Republic re- 
leased their northern neighbors from these obligations, she did not accept 
them for herself, nor indeed could she ; the mere supposition that she 
did so would, under the circumstances, be an absurdity. But the 
United States now demand conditions from Mexico which they themselves 
were confessedly unable to fulfill. The truth is that the predatory bands 
and the tribes of wild Indians live in perpetual war with both Govern- 
ments, for they war against society at large and against civilization, and 
neither Government can be held responsible for the outrages committed 
by them so long as willful neglect cannot be ascribed to either for their re- 
pression. To attempt to meet these difficulties by the high-handed pro- 
ceeding of entering our neighbor's territory by force of arms can have 
only one result, and that a disastrous one for this country. Divided as 
they are by internecine strife, the Mexicans would rise and band together 
as one man to resist foreign aggression from whatever source, and to pre- 
serve the integrity of their country. The Government of Diaz has so far 
been an undoubted success. Liberal measures have been adopted and car- 
ried out in spite of every obstacle, and in the face of unusual difficulties. 
Both the Government and people are desirous — indeed, anxious — to meet 
Americans half way, but they refused to be coerced. A friendly recogni- 



tion, such as is demanded by them of us, would go far to foster commer- 
cial interests of great magnitude which now lie perdu, but which will 
hereafter be developed for the mutual interests of the two countries, but 
more especially for the interests of the United States. 



A lot of 50 shares Central Pacific Railroad is reported sold in the 
Board at 85. Sales from private hands within the past few days embrace 
700 shares San Francisco Gas at 94Jfa!)o ; 200 shares Spring Valley Water, 
91£@-91i ; 100 shares Bank of California, 90| ; and 50 shares San Fran- 
cisco Dry Dock, on terms reserved. 

AMERICAN DISTRICT TELEGRAPH. 



COBTVENIEXCE. 




PROTECTION. 



LINES BTJTtiT AND BOX FTJT IN FREE. 
Eental, §2.50 Per Month. 

JOHN I. 8AJBIX, Superintendent, 
February 9. 222 Sunsome Street. 

SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS UNION, 
532 California Street, Corner Webb, San Francisco. 

Deposit* 31st December, 1S77 88,544,738 07. 

Guarantee Capital and Reserve Fund 8148,233 69. 

Directors :-^TAMES DE FREMERY, President ; ALEERT MILLER, Vice-Presi- 
dent ; C. Adolphe Low, Charles Baum, Erwin J. Crane, Washington Bartlett, Charles 
Pace, Denis J. Oliver, Alexander Campbell, Sr. 

LOYELL WHITE Cashier. | JOHN ARCHB ALD Surveyor. 

HENRY C. CAMPBELL Attorney. 

Receives Deposits and loans money on Real Estate Security. County Remittances 
may be sent by Wells, Fargo & Co. , or by checks of reliable parties, payable in San 
Francisco, but the responsibility of this Savings Bauk commences only with the ac- 
tual receipt of the money. 

The signature of the Depositor should accompany the first deposit. No charge is 
made for pass book or entrance fee. Office Hours : 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. ; Saturday eve- 
nings, from 6£ to 8. Feb. 9. 

AGRICULTURAL PARK, LOS ANGELES, TO LET. 

Office Southern District Agricultural Society, I*os Ang-eles. 
January 25th, 1S75- —Proposals will be received for leasing the Buildings and 
Race Track at Agricultural Park, Los Angeles, until the 15th of February, the lease 
to terminate on the 1st of November, 1S78, or continued if satisfactory to all con- 
cerned. The buildings are all in good repair and built within the last few years, the 
track equal to any in the State. Luxuriant shade-trees embellish the entire grounds, 
and the surrounding scenery is beautifuL To a person possessed of the requisite 
means and the experience necessary to conduct such a business, this is the finest op- 
portunity on the Pacific Coast. Address proposals to GEO. O. TIFFANY, 
Feb. 9. Secretary Southern Uist. Ag'l Soc'y, Los Angeles, CaL 

LONDON ASSURANCE CORPORATION, OF .LONDON. 

Established 1720 Assets, $15,146,094. 

WESTERN ASSURANCE COMPANY, OF TORONTO. 

Established 1851 — Assets, Sl.200,764. 

CROSS & CO., 316 California street, San Francisco, 
George E. Butler, Manager. [Feb. 9.] General Agents. 

TO OWNERS OF REAL ESTATE. 

Persons owning Real Estate that has heretofore been as- 
sessed in the former owner's name are requested to appear personally, or send 
their Deeds to the Assessor's Office, S. E. corner Kearny and Washington street3 
(Old Hall of Records), immediately, and have the proper changes made for next 
year's Roll The work on the Real Estat-e Roll for 1S7S will commence in a few days, 
after which it will be too late for any changes. ALEXANDER BADLAM , 
Feb. 0. City and County Assessor. 

THE PAINTING, "A SEMINARY ALARMED," 

By Toby E. Rosenthal, is now on view at onr Gallery—Ad- 
mission, 25 cents. The Painting has been photographed by W ATKINS, and 
copies are for sale by Amos Currier, Lippi Bros., Sanborn, Vail & Co., and at theGal- 
lery. All photographs which do not bear the imprint of either W ATKINS or the 
BERLIN PHOTOGRAPH COMPANY are but copies of other Photographs, and not 
from the original. {Feb. 9.] SNOW & MAY. 

WE HAVE EEEN APPOINTED 

Sole Agents for the Pacific Coast of Moet & Chandon's Cel- 
ebrated CHAMPAGNES, and have in store : 

SXLLERY Quarts and Pints, in Basket. 

CEEMANT Quarts and Pints, in Case. 

A supply kept constantly on hand. [Feb. 9.] WM. T. COLEMAN & CO. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Home Mntnal Insurance Company.— This Company will 
pay its regular monthly dividend of one per cent, upon its capital stock on 
the 11th Instant. J. F. HOUGHTON, President. 

San Francisco, February 6, 1878. Feb. 9. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
he State Investment and Insurance Company. --Dividend 

The monthly dividend for January will be paid on February 10th, at 



T 



their office, No.'s 2IS and 220 Sansome street. 
San Francisco, February 5, 1878. 



CHAS. H. CUSHING, 
Secretary. 



Edward R. Hill.] HILL BROTHERS, [Robert R. Hill. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in Artists" Materials, Pic- 
tures of all kinds, Gold and Fancy Frames, Mats, Passepartouts, etc., etc. 
20 Post street (opposite Mechanics' Institute), San Francisco, CaL Feb 9. 






CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER, 



13 



THE AMERICAN GOLD GRAVEL COMPANY OF NEW 
YORK AND CHILI. VERSUS PARAFF GOLD. 
The South Pacific Times. . 4 < aUao, Para, of I'., tttil, gives the 
■ the Bull Butter Count, PamiT: 

irtoamr, who purchased * ftharo In the I'araff speoulatton in April 
laM. hu toiled a writ again*! the dm i mpanr, called "A I'ur.tt 

SaDora raraff. i i mi. I /. M I Iho restitution 

. r with ml. r. -1 Up to ll 
-*-»* Ortunr hai*-* hi* action on the faet that the compaiu constituted a 
the member* utf whtch are nvpoulble for Its debt! to the full artsnt 

ut their name*, ami tl pah aSSST JVtlWhttoll rmim tMrr* that ho was 

Induced t*> |«ircha*c the share* In question. wall oonttnuei tiMOBW W Wi cu rfo, his 

unprbonment hftTiiv alrwulv lasted sboul two mantba, md tile publ ic rotos ittrlb- 

nice uodcrhand motive* t-> those oooooriMd in the prosecution. BvanttM Judge hits 

in f<>r the share of censure. 

This item reminds us of the Emma mine sale in London, whero our 

British coastal accused the Yankees of swindling them on thin sale. The 

Englishmen themselves wen the sellers of the Emma mine to 

UmIt own countrymen. So His with jntor Paraff. Chileans themselves 

helped him to carry out this swindle in order to fill their own pockets. 

Prom the Chfleen no wspsper, El Deber, we gather how some citizens of 

the United States have knocked Paraff out of the heads of Chileans. 

Mr. Flagler, ol New York, end President of the great Pipe Manufactur- 

mpanyof Boston, formed a company in that city for the purchase 

of the gold gravel fields <>f Catapilco, Chili. The company has a capital 

stock of $10,000,000. Mr. Flagler has proved practically to the Chileans, 

by sampling most carefully the property purchased, that the great riches 

of gold in t hili arc contained in its gravel fields and quartz mines. The 

purchase of these gravel properties hy Americana rather startled the 

bo now see that Mr. Henry Sewell, M. E. t gave them sound 

when pointing out in what the gold riches of Chili consisted, and 

not in the legerdemain production "f gold by the Butter Count. The great 

wold fields recently purchased by our countrymen are very extensive; 

many hundred miles of these exist all along the coast of Chili, and many 

of these are being taken up by the native Chilians, in consequence of 

the American Gold Gravel Company carrying out operations onagigantic 

scale. Mr. Harry Holcomb, formerly of California, is the manager. He 

has now 163 men at work in the Catapilco gold diggings, preparing the 

ground and making a great ditch for future operations. The average of 

the gravel, through and through, is said to be 50 cents to the cubic yard. 

AFFAIRS IN FRANCE. 
The political sky, which so recently was overclouded in France, 
seeems to have cleared up wonderfully. The moderate Republicans are 
bending even the Senate to their will. The statement of Thiers that the 
lie was that form of government which least divided Frenchmen 
seems to be more true to-day than ever before. The broken spirit of the 
Bight has lieen illustrated in the election of the Due d'Audriffet-Pasquier 
as President of the Senate by 172 to CA votes cast, and there were 61 
blank ballots, put in by irreconcilable Legitimists and Bonapartists who 
hated the Duke too much to vote for him, but, having no candidate of 
their own, had not the courage to vote against him. A decree has been 
issued stopping all press prosecutions for offences committed between the 
ltith of May and the 14th of December, and, to crown all, General Ducrot 
has been removed from his command, as he was suspected of counseling 
or being ready to participate in a coup d'etat, and relegated to engineering 
work _ a ll proofs of the completeness of the Liberal triumph. The latest 
piece of French news is, however, the most important for us, and that is, 
that the Senate has unanimously passed a bill still further suspending the 
obligation of the Mint to coin silver— action taken in view of what is im- 
pending in this country, and of the well-known readiness of the German 
< [orernment to pour a quantity of silver, variously estimated from $100,- 
000,000 to §200,000,000, into the market whenever there is any new open- 
in-. M. de Parieu, perhaps the highest authority iu France on coinage 
questions, seized the opportunity of urging the adoption of a gold stand- 
ard. _^ 

TOO MUCH AT ONE TIME. 
The glorious rain, which we were all so anxious should come, promises 
to give us a flood. Already it has done much mischief. In the vicinity of 
Sacramento the plains are flooded, and present the appearance of a vast 
sea. The experiences of the hour will not be without their value, if they 
but teach us to provide better drainage and stronger levees in the future. 
As instances in point, we may mention that there are 1,863 acres of land 
in the Sutterville district, where the Levee burst, which is worth S250 an 
acre all through. The city of Sacramento built all their levees heretofore, 
and charged them nothing; it has protected them on the north besides, 
and the owners of this valuable land were not able to keep its front levees 
iu order. A tax of $10 an acre would amount to $18,630, and half that 
amount would have been sufficient for all purposes! The Grand Island land, 
not half so valuable, has been assessed $20 an acre for levee purposes, and 
paid it too! It will cost these people on the Riverside road, say $5 an acre to 

Iiay for the closing of this break; but what is that to land so valuable— 
ands that rent at $20 to $35 an acre per annum. 

The remarkable success with which " One who Knows" preserves 
the secret of his identity, is only equaled by the amiable persistence with 
! which he floods the press with cards written over that signature. Ac- 
cording to Ins own testimony, he should be an encyclopsediac monster of 
Information, teeming with data and statistics and impregnable in his po- 
sition. Upon thin supposition people have attempted to penetrate the 
mystery of the prolific cardwriter. It is thought difficult to find "One 
I wiiu Knows" among the pack of people who don't know anything, whom 
1 one encounters in daily life. People who think it impossible are those 
who read the signatures and skip the cards. Those who read the cards 
and skip the signatures would prosecute a search for the writers among 
the " Retreats for Idiots." 

Abandoned Wives and Children.— The inexpressibly cruel offense 
of abandoning wives and children without cause, is becoming painfully 
frequent. It is a lamentable omission from the law, that it does not pro- 
vide an adequate remedy for this state of things. Mr. Grove Johnson 
has introduced a bill intended to cure the evil, which has assumed regret- 
table proportions. It is to be hoped that bill will pass, for to our mind 
it is impossible to imagine any ground upon which it can be honestly op- 
posed. We have discussed toe BUbject at length elsewhere. We also 
print favorable indorsements of the bill by the Bulletin, Chronicle, Alto. 
and Pott. 



CATCHING INHUMAN MON3TERS. 
It having become necessary to lasso inhuman monsters hereabouts, 
Mr. Grove Johnson has introduced a bill into the Assembly, which the 
Bulletin thus explains; " Mr. .Johnson has Introouoed a bill to amend 

section l-C of the ' 'i\ il Code so as to read as follows: ' While an notion for 

dii ores la pending, or while the tasl uliy abandont tin- iptfg with- 

out o M worce, the Court may, In its discretion, require the husband to pay 
any money necessary to enable the wife to support herself or her children.' 
The words in Italics are those which it is proposed to add to the notion, 

which otherwise remains unaltered. The object is to provide means, 
which do not now exist, by which the husband, who, without cause, 
abandons his wife and children, can be compelled to contribute toward 
their support." 

The vhronicU, in reference to the same subject, says: " The object 
sought is to compel husbands, who abandon their families without cause, 
to provide such support as a Court may, in the exercise of its discretion, 
order. This does not change the principle of the law, for that at present 
provides that a husband shall support his wife, but if he neglects or refuses 
so to do, it does not furnish an adequate remedy. All a wife can in that 
case do is to obtain credit, if possible, and get tradesmen to sue her hus- 
band for necessary articles supplied her. This is a roundabout and in- 
effective way of doing that which it is now proposed ro do in a direct 
manner that cannot fail to bring to book men, who, without cause, 
abandon their wives and their little ones, and allow the latter to become 
a charge upon the public." 

The Aha says: Husbands who can pay, and wont pay, ought to be 
made to pay. " To which doctrine the News Letter, with all its heart, says 

Amen! 

THE PRESIDENT OF MEXICO AND THE MINING 
INTERESTS OF THAT REPUBLIC. 

It may concern some of our readers to know the great interest 
President Porfirio Diaz takes in the mining future of his country. He 
addresses a letter to one of our esteemed correspondents, a well known 
mining engineer, and a great friend of President Diaz, who formerly rep- 
resented some English mining companies not far from the city of Mexico: 

Mexico, January 12, 1878. 

Henry Sewell, Esq., Mining Engineer, Palace Hotel, San Francisco— -My Dear 
Sir: I received your favor of the 12th November last. As regards the several mat- 
ters of importance which you kindly point out to me in reference to our mining 
interests, I may inform you I have given full weight to all you say, and will take all 
the steps possible to carry out your views, especially every means to attract English 
and American capital into this country, hy modifying our mining laws to such an 
extent that this branch may offer perfect security of titles, as well as protection in 
every shape by my Government. 

\ will soon provide myself with the new Spanish mining law, which you recom- 
mend me to peruse, and if, as you say, these new law s offer tho greatest guarantee of 
any mining laws known, I shall certainly propose them to Congress. 

You may rely on my giving great attention to this branch of our enormous 
wealth, laying almost dormant since our forefathers, the Spaniards, produced such 
untold riches. 

I shall feel much interested in the mining pamphlet you intend forwarding me. 

Hoping you are quite well, believe me. 

Your affectionate friend, Poefirio Diaz. 



THE BEST MEASURE YET. 

Senator Searles has recently introduced a bill that may, to a certain 
extent, regulate the many evils practiced under the guise of " Mine 
Management." It creates the office of Mining Commissioner, to keep an 
office in San, Francisco; to have power of sending experts to examine any 
mine, sworn to report the truth; to require each corporation to furnish a 
weekly report, under oath, of all explorations in its mine, and also a like 
report, once a month, of the financial condition of the corporation; to obtain 
statistics and information about all the mines in the State, and report the 
same to the Governor once a year; to keep on file in his office, and access- 
able to the public, the weekly reports of Superintendents, and monthly 
reports of finances of all corporations having offices in the State. It also 
requires a light tax to be levied on all transactions in the Stock Boards — 
half of one per cent. 

Such a measure would clearly be in the interests of honost stockholders, 
and against swindling manipulators, who again and again have plundered 
this community most shamefully through their periodical "deals." The 
"ring" regulating such manipulations, would have to resort to a more 
honorable avocation. 

TWO HAPPY PAIRS. 

Misses Ruth and Florence Mathews, two young ladies widely 
known and esteemed in this city, were last week severally united, by the 
Rev. Jno. Hemphill, to Messrs. C. H. Hopkins and John Hay. In 
order to be more clearly understood, it is perhaps as well to say that Miss 
Ruth Mathews bestowed her hand on Mr. C. H. Hopkins, while Miss 
Florence Mathews became the happy bride of Mr. John Hay. Mr. Hop- 
kins is the senior member of the firm of Hopkins & Macfarlane, and a 
member of the Stock Board. Mr. Hay is a nephew of Colonel J. l3. Fry, 
and equally weD known in society circles. Ihe dual wedding was cele- 
brated in the apartments of the family, at the Palace Hotel. No invita- 
tions were extended, except to personal friends and relatives, and the fes- 
tivities were therefore strictly private, as is now the fashion in the beau 
monde. It is understood that Mr. and Mrs. Hopkins will start for Eu- 
rope in time to be present at the Paris Exposition. The two youug 
couples have our sincerest wishes for their future happiness. 

SANITARY NOTES. 

One hundred and seven deaths occurred this week, as compared 
with 94 last, and 130 for the corresponding week last year. The mortality 
is raised by G accidental deaths and 3 suicides. There were only 7 Chi- 
nese ; 39 were under 5 years, and 48 between 20 and 60 years ; 14 were 
over (JO years, and 3 died of old age. 

There is a good deal of lingering zymotic disease, though diptheria was 
less fatal than it has been for many weeks. The numbers were 2 typhoid 
fever ; 1 remittent ; 4 diptheria ; 6 measles ; 2 scarlatina; 1 chicken-pox ; 
1 cholera ; 15 persons died of consumption ; 6 of pneumonia ; 2 of con- 
gestion of tbe lungs; 1 of pleurisy. There were 7 deaths from heart dis- 
ease and 3 from bronchitis ; 2 Bright's disease. Two cases of small-pox 
have been reported during the week. 

Pacific Lodge No. 48, I. O. B. B., will hold a pic-nic at Fassking's 
Park. Sunday, May 19th. 



u 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Feb. 9, 1878. 



Cradle. Altar, and Tomb. 



CRADLE. 

Anders — In this city, Feb. 6, to the wife of A. A. Anders, a son. 
Archibald— In this city. Feb. 2, to the wife of P. L. Archibald, a son. 
Blacheee— In this city, Feb. 2, to the wife of Frank Blachree, a son. 
Coyne— In thiB city, Feb. 3; to the wife of D. Coyne, a daughter. 
Davis— In this city, Feb. 4, to the wife of Dr. G. E. Davis, a son. 
Ebbinghacses— In this city, Feb. 4, to the wife of Henry Ebbinghausen, a Bon. 
Frank— In this city, Feb. 5, to the wife of Wm. Frank, a daughter. 
Gorie— In this city, Feb. 3, to the wife of James Gorie, a son. 
Hardy— In this city, Feb. 1, to the wife of Lowell J. Hardy, Jr., a son. 
Kradse— In this city, Feb. 2, to the wife of Charles Krause, a son- 
Lux — In this city, Feb. 6, to the wife of F. A. Lux, a daughter. 
Perry— In this city, Feb. 3, to the wife of J. W. Perry, a son. 
Wilson— In this city, Jan. 28, to the wife of Captain Wilson, a son. 

ALTAR. 

Crowe-Rieley— In this city, Jan. 27, James W. Crowe to Lizzie A. Rieley. 
Fey-Hartman— In this city, Feb. 3, Conrad Fey to Emma Hartman. 
Gcmpertz-Arendt— In this city, Feb. 3, Gustave Gumpertz to Julia Arendt. 
Jacobson-Ostrosky— In this city, Feb. 3, Raphael Jacobson to Paulina Ostrosky. 
McCarthy-Sullivan— In this city, Feb. 5, D. McCarthy to Miss H. Sullivan. 
Meloney-Evers— In this city, Feb. 3. Wm. W. Meloney to A. Mary Evers. 
Nash-Henderson— In this city, Feb. 6, Joseph Nash to Carrie F. Henderson. 
Ormiston-Reynolds— In this city,, Feb. 6, John Ormiston to Maggie Reynolds. 
Samisch-Franrlin— In this city, Feb. 3, Robert Samisch to Gussie Franklin. 

TOMB. 

Allan— In this city, Feb. 6. Annie Allan, aged 43 years. 
Albokn— In this city, Feb. 2, Amalie Alborn, aged 24 years. 
Bonnes— In this city, Feb. 5, Leootine Bonnet, aged 31 years. 
Baird— In this city, Feb. 5, Robert Baird, aged 52 years. 
Calhoun— In this city, Feb. 5. Charles A. Calhoun, aged 67 years. 
Felvey— In this city, Feb. 3, Eddie Felvey, aged 10 years. 
Hart— In this city, Feb. 4, John Thomas Hart, aged 4 years. 
Johnson— In this city, Feb. 1, Ann D. Johnson, aged 54 years. 
Kenny— In this city, Feb. 2, Catherine Kenny. 
Larsen— In this city, Feb. 5, Mary Larsen, aged 37 years. 
McCauley— In this city, Feb. 2, Officer John F. McCauley, aged 41 years. 
Myers— In this city, Feb. 2, Margaret M. Myers, aged 55 years. 
Matison— In this city, Feb. 3, Mrs. Elizabeth Matison, aged 45 years. 
Mosher— In this city, Feb. 6, John Mosher, aged 64 years. 
Wagoner — In this city, Feb. 3, John Wagoner, aged 33 years. 
Walsh— In this city, Feb. 4, Margaret Walsh, aged 75 years. 

USEFUL KNOWLEDGE. 

[From the British Trade Journal for January, 1878.] 
The ' ' Transactions of the Medical Society of Upsala, ' ' contain 
an account of an ingenious piece of rascality in the hop trade, said to be 
practiced on a considerable scale in that city. Hops which have already 
been used for making extracts or for brewing in the ordinary way, are 
damped with tincture of absinthe or wormwood, freed from spirit by dis- 
tillation, re-dried and then placed in the market as a genuine article with 
or without the addition of a little fresh bloom. Owing to their increased 
bitterness they often command a better price than unadulterated hops. 

The revolution that has occurred in our commerce with the United 
States is expressed by a few figures. In 1865 the value of British exports 
to the Union amounted to §122,000,000, against §84,700,000 imported by 
us from that country during the same period. In 1876, however, the 
tables were turned ; for, while our exports to the States had dwindled to 
898,000,000, the value of the goods imported reached the large sum of 
6367,352,000, showing a balance in favor of America, in the twelve 
months, of $269,000,000. 

Lucifer matches are beginning to find a good market in China, those 
imported being the safety kind and of Swedish make. Their qualities 
of cheapness, portability, and convenience are fully appreciated by the 
Chinese, and they obtain a large sale at the Treaty ports and the more 
considerable townB in the interior. Their importation into Formosa is of 
recent date, but there is every reason to expect that their consumption 
will increase yearly. 

The Union Royal Mail Steamship Company's ship German has 
made the shortest passage on record to the Cape of Good Hope. She 
left Plymouth at 2:20 p.m. on the 28th of September, and reached Ma- 
deira in three days and eighteen hours. She left Madeira after two hours' 
detention, and reached Table Bay at 11 p.m. on the 18th of October. The 
distance run was 5,920 miles, and. the average run per day 308 miles. 

The following revised scale of charges for inland money came into 
operation on the 1st of January: For sums under 10s., twopence ; 10s. 
and under £2. threepence ; £2 and under £3, fourpence ; £3 and under £4, 
fivepence ; £4 and under £5, sixpence ; £5 and under £6, sevenpence ; £6 
and under £7, eightpence ; £7 and under £8, ninepence ; £8 and under 
£9, tenpence ; £9 and under £10, elevenpence ; £10, one shilling. 

There is a growing market for window glass in Japan, where its 
use is ever increasing; paper, hitherto employed, having been discarded 
for glazing purposes. The importation into Japan during the first half- 
year of 1876 amounted to 10,719 cases, of which 5,649 were sent to Yoko- 
hama. The total number of cases sent to that country during 1876 ex- 
ceeded 22,000. 

Handkerchiefs are becoming an important article of import into 
China, o,nd untold quantities find their way into the interior. They are 
chiefly, if not all, of cotton fabric in gaudy patterns and colors, which 
will not stand much washing, but as that is a process they are not fre- 
quently subjected to and they are very cheap, little is said about it. 

Kangaroo hides have already become an important article of export 
from Australia. They make the most pliable leather that is known, ad- 
mirably fitted for boot-legs, gloves, and riding whips. The skins are sent 
to Europe, some tanned, and some simply dried. 

A new industry is said to be extending rapidly in Paris. It consists 
in the manufacture of a cloth five times lighter and three times warmer 
than wool, from the feathers of domestic and other birds. The material 
iB waterproof, and takes dye readily. 

' 'Arcadia ' ' is proposed as the name of a British- American province 
to be founded by the union of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and Prince 
Edward Island, if a plan of union can be agreed upon. 

Telephonic communication has been successfully established be- 
tween Nashville and Louisville, a distance of nearly two hundred miles. 



TEN PER CENT. FIRST MORTGAGE BONDS AT PAR. 

The Sierra Flume and lumber Company have mortgaged 
their large property — principally lands — to secure the payment of 1,200 Bonds 
of S500 each, running for one, two or three years, and hearing ten per cent, interest, 
payable semi-annually. Two hundred Bonds of either series are now offered for sale 
at par, to close this season's business. The remainder will be held for another year. 
The property cost over 31,400,000, and has produced the last six months 8300,000 
worth of lumber, at a cost of $400,000, most of which is stacked and drying, to be in 
readiness for sale, and for which there is a good market, both at home and abroad. 
Mr. Alvinza Hayward, being the chief owner, will give a written guarantee that the 
Bonds and interest will be paid at maturity. Merchants' Exchange Bank Stock will 
he taken in exchange at §75 per share. For Bonds and further particulars apply to 
R. G. SNEATH, President S. F. and L. Co., 
Nov. 17. 423 California street, San Francisco. 

IN CONSEaTTENSE OF SPURTOTT3 IMITATIONS 

Of LEA. A PERRIES' SAUCE, which are calculated to de- 
ceive the public, LEA AM) PEBRISTS have adopted A NEW LABEL 
BEARING THEIR SIGNATURE, LEA & PERRINS, which is placed on every bottle 
of WORCESTERSHIRE SAUCE, and without which none isgenuine. 

Ask for LEA & PERRINS' Sauce, and see name on wrapper, label, bottle and stop- 
per. Wholesale and for export by the proprietors, Worcester ; Crosse & Blackwell, 
London, etc., etc., and by grocers and oilmen throughoutthe world. To be obtained of 
Dec. 1. MESSRS. CROSS & CO., San Francisco. 

A. M. GILMAN, 

Importer and Wholesale Liquor Dealer, 308 California 
street, offers for sale Fine Old Bourbon and Rye Whiskies, Brandies, vintage of 
1820 and 1830, Old Port and Sherry Wines, Still and Sparkling Wines, etc. Agent for the 
Celebrated CACHET BLANC CHAMPAGNE. Sole Agent for MILLS' STOMACH 
BITTERS. March 4. 

m- PRINTS -^& 
537 SACRAXEENTO STREET, 

BELOW MONTGOMERY. 

ASHTON'S LIVERPOOL SALT. 

This celebrated brand of Salt lias been in constant use for 
more than half a century in the Eastern States, where for dury purposes it 
commands double the price of any other brand of Liverpool Salt. The undersigned 
•ere sole agents here, and offeritto the trade. WILLIAMS, BLANCHARD & CO., 
Jan. 5. 218 California street. 

ORLEAKS HOTEL. 

This Hotel having' changed its Management, is now under 
the charge of the undersigned, formerly of the Auzerais House, San Jose, and 
having been thoroughly refurnished throughout, is now first-class in all its appoint- 
ments. The patronage of the public is respectfully solicited. 
Sacramento, September 6, 1877. [Sept. 22.] J. M. STAPLES. 

CONSaMPTION AND WASTING DISEASES. 

The most efficacious remedy is Pancreatic Emulsion. The 
original and genuine prepared only by SAVORY & MOORE, 143 New Bond- 
street, London. Sold by them and all Chemists and Storekeepers throughout the 

June 30. 



JBRTTOE, 



D. F. HUTCHINQS. 



M. DUNKE. J. SAKDERSON. 

PHCENIX OIL WORKS. 

Established 1S50.— Hatchings A- Co., Oil and Commission 
Merchants, Manufacturers and Dealers in Sperm, Whale, Lard, Machinery and 
Illuminating Oils, 517 Front street, San Francisco. Jan. 8. 

CAREW LEDGER PAPERS 

Have no equal for making Blank Books. John G. Hodge 
& Co., Importers and Manufacturing Stationers, 327, 329, 331 Sansome street 
Agents for the Pacific Coast. Nov. 4. 

MILLS' SEMINARY. 
he next term will commence on Wednesday, January 9th, 

1878. For circulars or information, apply to REV. C. T. MILLS, 

Jan. 5. Brooklyn. 



T 



Wm. Irvine.] IRVINE & LE BRETON, [A. J. Lb Breton. 

Attorneys and Counselors at Law, No. 631 Sacramento 
street, Astor Block, San Francisco. ly 14. 



s 



LEE DARNEAL CRAIG, 
uccessor to Frank T. Scudder, Notary Public and Commis- 
sioner of Deeds, 611 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal. August 4 



S' 



JOSEPH GILLOTT'S STEEL PENS. 
old by all Stationers. Sole Agent for the United States: 



MR. HENRY HOE, 91 John street, N. Y. 



Jan. 5. 



F 



MORBIS SPEYEB, 
ire and Marine Insurance Agent, 307 California street. 

Dwelling, 507 Post street. January 1, 187S. Jan. 12. 



p 



QUICKSILVER. 
or sale— In lots to suit, by Thomas Bell, STo. 305 Sansome 

street, over Bank of California. Nov. 16. 



H 



J. C. JOHNSON & CO, 
arncss and Saddlery of every description. 12 and 14 Pine 

street, San Francisco. Dec. 15. 



L- G. PARTRIDGE, 

Attorney at Law. Jfo. 6 Montgomery Avenue, corner Mont- 
gomery (third floor), San Francisco. Jan. 5. 



OFFICES OF THE AEROPLANE NAVIGATION CO., 

Jan. 4. No. 607 to 615 Merchant street, San Francisco. 

CHARLES LE GAT, 
American Commission Merchant, - - 1 Rne Scribe, Paris. 

£L~S £}f\£\ Salary. Permanent salesmen wanted to sell 

MI? ■ j£j\ "* * Staple Goods to dealers. No paddling. Expenses paid. Address 



Sept. 1.] 



S. A. GRANT & CO., 2,4, 6 and 8 Home St., Cincinnati, O. 



M^,-£Ot_H_F Particulars free. 



Sept. 1.] 



Agents wanted 

Address 

J. WORTH 



Business legitimate. 

i CO., St. Louis, Mo. 



CjNQGold Plated Watches. Cheapest in the known world. 

Ni90 Sample Watch Free to Agents. Address 
Sept. 1.] A. COULTER & CO., Chicago. 



>, 1878. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



15 



MR WHITTEER'S RESPONSE. 
[The ' ' Literary World " fov -January contain* tin foflowtng nBOSfa] 
■v Mr. Whittier, written in acknowledginent of tin- multitude <>f 
iiata tribute* ceiled oat by the celebration ■ ■! hi- seventieth birth- 
day]: 

■ iim where Mm leva] mil, 
Nigh bis but) low rays 

ord and won h done, 

I. if.'- blewting threads "f good end ill outspaa, 

your w.>r«ts of ohaar and praise, 
Hall doabtfnl if myself «>r otherwnw, 
Lfte him who, in the old Arabian joke, 
A I- iggar slept snd crowned Caliph woke. 
Thank.* not tfae less, With not angled surprise 
- iv life-work through your partial 
id, in giving to my home-taught songs 
A higher value than of right belongs, 

do bnt read between the writteu lines 
The liner grace of unfulfilled designs. — J. G. W. 

' I ' M V \ LONDON ' ' TIMES " ON THE SITUATION. 
We extract the following from the letter of " Our Own Correspond- 
ent " of the London Kates, on the late disturbances: 

Sax Fhanctbco, Deo. 12. 

The demonstration on the 39th ult by the working classes fortunately 
passed off in a very quiet manner, and although on that day there wore 
assembled in the streets of this city 10,000 men who had real and imagin- 
ary grievances to redress, they did not attempt any violence. This took 
manr by surprise, as an outbreak was fully expected and due precautions 
had been adopted to counteract it. But the principal reason was on- 
lly to be found in the fact that there existed serious disunion in 
the ranks of tlte disaffected, one parly, and that a large one, being bit- 
terly opposed to the leadership of the President of the Workingmen's 
Convention. Another reason maybe attributed to the well-grounded 
fears that prevailed among all classes of citizens from the communistic 
principles asserted by the ringleaders of the mob, and a wholesome ap- 

{>rehension that property, to whomever it might belong, would be ruth- 
ed in the event of a riot. When it is considered that there 
are 40,000 property owners in the city, it would appear that their opinions 
would have great weight in maintaining order. However this may be, 
no riot occurred, and the local papers were loud in their approbation of 
the peaceable demeanor of those engaged in the demonstration, which, 
ktly influence the action of Congress in dealing 
with the < !hinese question. It was generally thought that the incendiary 
speeches that had been delivered and given so much disquiet meant noth- 
ing, and that the working classes intended to be on their good behavior 
for the future, trusting solely to legitimate means for redress of their 
grievances. In this expectation, however, judging from recent events, we 
are doomed to disappointment. The same spirit of disorder and violence 
lea every meeting that is now held, and only the night before last 
the President of the Workingmen's Convention, Kearney, had a gather- 
ing of his followers, which is thus reported by one of the daily papers. 

[Here follows an account of the proceedings held at the monster meeting 
on the sand lots.] 

A protest against extreme measures has been entered by the Working- 
men's Convention at Sacramento, and a great deal of disunion exists in 
the camp generally. For these reasons, the violence contemplated may 
be averted fcr a time, but those who now make the Chinese the principal 
pretext for riot will scarcely be satisfied, even though Congress should in- 
terfere to prevent further immigration. The people of Sacramento have 
good cause to recollect the effects of a riot there in 1850. On that occa- 
Son, certain men who had land grievances to complain of, banded them- 
selves together in what was called the Squatter Organization. They 
armed themselves and publicly defied the authorities. The Mayor and 
other officials were shot or wounded, and for some time afterward the city 
had to be placed under military control. From that time the population 
dwindled down from 10,000 to 4,000 souls. In subsequent years, fire and 
cholera did much to injure that city, but the first set back to its prosper- 
ity was the riot in 1850, from which it has never subsequently recovered. 
The taxpayers of San Francisco are beginning to feel the shoe pinch, as 
they have been called on to pay various large amounts as the results of 
damage done during the riots in July last, and they may well have a 
wholesome dread of a repetition of such acts or an extended scale. 

By a recent decision in the Supreme Court of the United States, the 
levying of a tax on immigrants by a State has been pronounced unconsti- 
tutional, that power being only vested in Congress. A Bill has been in- 
troduced into Congress for the purpose of levying a tax of $250 a head 
on every Chinese subject who enters the ports of the United States. 
This, if it becomes law. will very effectually prevent immigration ; but 
the question arises whether such a measure would not conflict with our 
national obligations. Another proposition has been laid before Congress 
to limit the number of Chinese to be admitted into the ports of the 
United States, but in both cases the discrimination exercised would prob- 
ably prove offensive to the Chinese Government, who could, however, do 
nothing more than r etaliate in kind. 

There haa been a fatal catastrophe on Mont St. Bernard. On the 25th 
ult., five travelers started from the cantine of Proz for the Great St. Ber- 
nard. Snow was falling thickly, and a violent north wind was blowing it 
along in blinding clouds ; still, notwithstanding the remonstrances of the 

Sroprietor of the cantine, they determined to continue their journey. 
Tight overtook them at the bridge of Nudry, about an hour's distance 
from the convent. Three of the party soon after became so exhausted 
that they were unable to proceed, but the others started for the hospital, 
where they arrived iu about two hours, having mistaken their way and 
wandered about for a time in the dark. The monks immediately set out 
for the rescue of the other three, taking with them their dogs and a good 
supply of restoratives, and after some hard work they succeeded in dis- 
covering them — one dead, and the legs and arms of the other two frozen. 
One of the two survivors died shortly after his admission to the hospital, 
but the other is in a fair way to recover. — European Mail. 

We are informed by a Wisconsin journal that we shall soon see the 
end of the world. So wags the world. 



REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS 

Recorded in the City and County of San Francisco, California, for the 
Week ending February 6, 1878. 

Com/tUtti/rom the Stccrdi of the Mercantile Agency of John McKillop <£ Vo. t 
401 California Street, Han /Vmnciseo. 



Thursday, January 31st. 



OBANTOR TO OHANTEK. 



Win QerlngtoOstb TGering.... 
R \V Coffin 10 Wm hYuell find wf. 
Alex \\ ell] to CbasW Akman.... 
Julia Murphy to M McCarthys. . . 

Edwin F Child to l> Z Tost 

Patk Heath to Odd Pel Sav Bonk. 

Daniel O'Brien to Annie O'Brien. 
Patk Feency to Frank H Dcidell. 

Hartley Canovan to J Blattery 

O C Cornwall to Anna M Bailey. . 

Sav and Ln Soc to F E Rogers 

David Cheverto Edw Chever , 

A Qrlmwood to Wm Hayes , 

C A Castner to Danl McFaden.... 



ITGSieberstto A Williamson... 
Squire P Dewey to Horace Davis. 

A Williamson to Same 

AVm Bally to a II Buwden 

Wm Winter to C O'Hanlon 



DBBCnil'TION. 



I in he 



rTe 19th, 108 nw Foiaom, nw BSzTQ 

B Kansas, 100 b 54th or Sonoma, a 50x100 

N 17th, 396 e Douglas, e 74x280 

Nw Nairnna, iu:. ne Bib, ne 25x80 

w Hyde, ion a Sacramento, « 87:8x187:6. 

Lots 287, 889, 841, 848, 846, 847. 248, 249, 
251 , Gift Map No 2 

Nw Ringold, 150 sw 8th, BW 25x75 

S Pine, 82:6 e Buchanan, e 87:6x118:6... 

S Howard, 205 w 1st, w 25x85 

\V Kearny, 40 e Filbert, s 40x60 

S Day, 55 Church, e 25x114 

N Sacramento, 91 :4 e Dupont, e 25x 120. . 

310th. 192 c Castro, e 86x130 

Ne 23d av, 450 nw K, nw 25, nc 56, nw 
to R It av, n to L, ne to a p'nt, se 150, 
sw 100 to commencement 

Sw 7th and Ilnrrieon, s 50x100 

Sw 7th and Harrison, se 75x130 

| Same 

Nw Silver, 275 sw 3d, sw 40x75 

|N Clipper, 203:8 o Church, e 25:5#xll4. 



Gift 
$ 600 

8,000 

4,850 

5 

1,801 
Gilt 
3,600 
7,500 
1 
I 450 
500 
1 



5 

1 

1 

15,000 

4,000 

POO 



Friday, February 1st. 



J J Gallaeher to Hib Sav Ln Soc. 

S Newmun by ShlT to Same 

J B Palmer to John G Ayers 



Maurice Dore to Jos B Palmer. . . 
Chas E ConviB to Root B Grey.... 

Same to Same 

Jas Garvey to Wm Hind 

Jos Rlngot to Cath A Carlton 

Wm Bruce to Eliza Case 

Rowland R Crocker to S D Falls. 
Edw Ruseell to Chas II Hubbard. 
Milton S Latham lo Alex Boyd... 
Henry Dowden to Maria Dowden. 
Benj Morrison to Lelitia Morrison 
Eileu McCormick to James Scobie 



Lots 11, 13, 15, blk 29, Fairmonnt Tract. 

Sw Beale, 93:0 nw Folsom, nw 22x75 

E Webster, 137:0 n Broadway, n 137:0 n 
e 137:0 



Se Vallejoand Webster, e 137:0x137:0... 
Lots 057, 059, 001, 003, Gift Map No 3... 

N Vallejo, 161:6 w Baker, w 48x150 

E Mason, 70 8 Chestnut, s 22:6x08 

Nw California and Scott, n 137:6x137:6.. 

S24th, 110 o Castro, e 25x114 

Lot 2, bik 112, University Hd ApBociat'n 

W Douglas, 154n 17th, n 54x130 

Se Sutter and Kearney ,s 122:0x97:6 

E Rendai pi, 225:10 s 10th, b 22:2x01:3'-i. 

N Butte, 75 e Jersey, e 25x100 

Sw Laekie, 250:6 nw Mission, nw 24:6x85 
subject to a $600 mortgage 



$2,196 
3,572 

6,000 

5 

3,600 

1,000 

2,500 

10,000 

" Gift 

500 

1,000 

265000 

Gilt 

Gilt 

2,500 



Saturday, February 2d. 



Mary T Daigneau to J Daignean. 
Thoa Magee to II F Winckelman 
Henry Chester to Kate McGee.... 
Wendell Easton to F F Osborn... 

Chas Strong to Sally Hill 



Sally Hill to T A L^rd 

Mary Delaney to J C Weir.. 



Eliza Meyers to Michl Callahan. 

Wm Mulvin to H J Weiss 

Michl Callahan to Eliza Meyers. 



N 16th av, 175 eQ, e 25x92 

S Fell, 27:0 e Laguna, e 27:6x120 

W York, 120 s 33d, s 26x100 

N Lizzie, 123:6 w California av, w 26:6x 

120 

Lots 07, 69, 71, and w X of lot 73, Gift 

Map No 3 

Same 

Se Washington and Fillmore, e 137:0x 

126:8i£ 

Ne 8th, 245 se Foiaom, se 3uxl20 

N Adair, 95 w Howard, w 28x75 

Ne 8th , 245 se Folsom, Be 30x120 



Gift 

$2,800 

2,650 



1,000 
1,250 

10,000 
5,500 
1,000 
5,500 



Monday, February 4th. 



Herman Lew to Miriam Karsky..|S O'Farrell, 56:3 e Buchanan, e 31:3x90 . 

J B Ransom to TH Hyatt S 20th, 330 e Dolores, c 50x114 

Geo De Cordy to Patk Kennedy. . Sw Chesley, 40 ee Boyd, ee 20x60 

J P Damerou to J M Morse jSe Mason and Pacific, a 73, e 75, n 10M, 

|" tb 27:8, n 02:8, w 103:2 to beginning .. 

R H Loyd to Wm Blackwood S Commercial, 50 w Drnmm, w 35x59:9. 

H Bomeisler to Mary E Grant .... Lot 32, blk 9, City Land Association. . . . 

W J Gunu to C P Murphy |Nw 26tb and Noe, w 80x114 ,.. 

A W Von Schmidt to I) RedraondlSe 21st av and Sacramento, e 82:6x104 . . 

Andw Helmer Jr to A Helmer Sr.|S 10th, ll.fl w Castro, w 35x100 

Joseph Kennedy toP Spaight ILots 160, 162, 104,166, Gift Map 2 

Cath Hencbry lo Michl Henebry ..N Ellis, 68:9 c Larkin, e 22:11x137:6. .. 

Chas HKilley to Darl Kelly E Fillmore, 77:6 s Filbert, s 30x87:6 

John W Roberts to Bridg Kelly ...|Se n, 225 ne 21st av, ne 33:7, e 63:9, s 
36:9, e78:3X 

Lots 8, 9, blk 642, Pt Lobos Av Hd. . . 

Same 

Lots 399,401 to 407, Gift Map 2; also, 
subs 32 to 35 of P V lots 182 to 193. 

Nw Noe and 25th, n 44x80 



Sarah E Speers to D B Franklin. 

Rebecca Dobson lo Same 

Harry Lacey to J J Pettigrcw.... 

Geo Edwards to Wm Axford 



$2,300 

10,000 

900 

300 
5 

75 

1,250 

365 

500 

$ 850 

6,000 

2,500 

300 
1 
1 

5 
2,400 



Tuesday, February 5th. 



Amos Macartney to Jae Ambrose. 
H P Livermore to A Macartney... 

A C Sibley to Jas Ambrose 

Mary A Mo wry to A S McAdams. 

W J Gunn to Mary A Mowry 

Edw W McCarthy to J McCarthy. 

Michl Walsh to M Dougherty 

W M Seaton to Patk Rafferty 



H S Dexter to Frank Barnard... 

City & Co S F to J F Taylor 

Coleman Stevens to M Stevens. 



Sw Palmer, 100 se Bartlett, se 50x100.... 

Lot 6, bib 120, Fairmonnt Tract 

Sw Palmer, 100 Be Uarllctf Be 50x100 . . . 

S Army, 80 e Noe, e 80x114 

Same . 

W Polk, 46:6 b Green, s 23x84:0 

N Prospect pi, 225 e Folsom, e 50x100. . . 
E Perrie, 350:4 n Pt Lobos av, n 50x 

116:11^ 

Ne Vallejo and Battery, n 91:8x137:6.... 

Sw Main, 350 se Folsom, Be 33x115 

Nw Brannan, 100 ne 6th, ne 35x110 



I 150 

5 

5 

800 

504 

4,600 

400 

500 
19,500 



Wednesday, February 6th. 



Eliza Perry to David J Perry 

Augusta T Smith to E Livingston 

Charles Jost to Wm W Morrow.. 
C Clayton ct al to Wm White.... 

Jno W Stevenson to Wm Hollis. . 

W F Cashman to A P Hotaling... 

E Banacino to John W Grace... 

Michl J Welsh to Jno F Lindon. 



E Hyde, 68:0 n Jackson , n 33x60 

N Pt Lobos av, 109:1-10 c 20th av, e 2Qx 

120... 

Cots 9, 10, blk 395, Great Park Hd Assn. 
Nw Frederick and Park av, n 110, w 77:2 

s 139:4. ne 20 to beginning 

N 18tb. 100 e Mission, e 25, n 113, w 2:6, 

n 8, w 22:6, s 116 to beginning 

W cor Howard and 9th, nw 127:0x113:4 ; 

subject to a mortgage for $15,000 

Lotl, blkU.RRHd Aesn; lot 24, blk 4 

lot 37, blk 10, Peoples Homestead Asn 
S California, 80 e Devieadero, s 110 x e 

27:0 



300 
600 

800 

3,935 

35,000 

1 

1,400 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Fet. 9, 1878. 



LIES OF THE DAY. 

A lie has no less, and cannot stand ; bnt it has -wines, and can fly far aid wide.— 
Warbtthtom. "With the adaptability of a lie, em has many tools, but a he is the handle 
which fitsthem all— Lord Brougham. A lie begets others; one lie must be tnatche 
with another, or it will soon rain through.— Lord Thurlowe. 

It is not true that Pay Director Cunningham has subsidized all the 
papers in the city to write up his personal popularity.— That Chief 
Clerk Philp devotes the leisure time he has to the composition of those 
complimentary notices, which are duly filed for use when occasion offers. 
—That what the Pay Director don't know about Bociety, he makes up 
for in moderate doses of theatrical observances.^— That the largewidow 
and the petite blonde can add to his repertoire of gossip by gaslight, in 
the parlors of the Baldwin.— That everybody is crazy to see Miss Cath- 
erine Lewis in opera bouffe at the Baldwin, but it is a positive fact that 
she is an assured success, and is as good as she is pretty, God bless her.—— 
That Harry Logan, the stock sharp via the G-us. Guerrero route, dyes his 
hair.— —That he has been younger in his time, and the ladies whom he 
ogles in the theaters begin to believe so. — That his last stock operations 
have been productive of bonanza results.-^— That many of the "old boys" 
really appear not to know that they are aged.— That John Clement 
says, that young men often have the gout.— That Sam Brannan thinks 
of joining the blue-ribbon brigade.— That he is in consultation with 
Delos Lake on the subject.^— That William N. Olmstead is growing fat. 
That young Garnett is a brilliant success as a lady-killer. ^— That 
William B. Murray intends to open a Japanese bazaar in the Union 
Club.— That his stock of goods invariably come from auction. —That 
a very good line of second-hand boots, Bhoes and old clothes will be judi- 
ciously distributed to customers as chromos.— That lady purchasers 
must get tickets, and come only at lunch time.-^That Harry Norton 
has been engaged at a moderate salary as door-keeper.— —That Joe Clark 
will wake up, once in a while, and exhibit the goods, and I. Lawrence 
Pool will pack them, and deliver parcels as addressed.^— That there is 
much mischief in the air now-a-days.-^— That a huge row is brew- 
ing at the Lick.^— That at the Palace the elements are in any- 
thing but a normal condition.— That Baldwin's has a cloudy ap- 
pearance. —That Blythe does not appreciate the Nell of former 
days.— That she is a jirm'un, and he had better keep his eyes wide 
open, especially nights.-^-That Deasy and the big dog are not adequate 
protection for " the quiet little red-faced millionaire."— That_ the pic- 
ture of himself, as exposed at the entrance of his wooden mansion, indi- 
cates a degree of self -admiration actually startling.— That he and Fleet- 
street Strother would travel excellently well in double harness.-^That 
George M. Pinney is again a happy Benedict.— That the homestead and 
other property will come back to him soon.^— That Horace Davis 
caught a Tartar, instead of a Chinaman, when he went back on his life- 
long friends in the Six Companies.^— That Gen. Tom Williams and 
George Roberts are the princes of the cold-water regime now-a-days, es- 
pecially along the Sacramento river line. — That guests of Tubbs' Hotel 
desirous of communicating with Sheldon I. Kellogg, Jr., will please defer 
it until after the 22d, as the Kangaroo, Boston -Dip, etc., etc., will mo- 
nopolize all his time.— —That R. C. Hooker has caught any Arizona fish 
lately.— That they are pretty keen fellows, and will not bite at bogus 
bait. -^— That Dr. (?) McLean, in Toland, Sr.'s, office says he will cow- 
hide any doctor that attends any of his patients.-^— That this rule will 
only apply after he gets in practice. -^That Searle's bill has 
caused the united brokers' heart to flutter.-^— That when it becomes a 
law, the Stock Exchange building will be rolled up on wheels to Virginia 
City, and emigrant cars will be put on the route to convey the mourn- 
ing members, the mining secretaries, and the big and little operators. — 
That it is the unanimous opinion ot the broker fraternity that they should 
never, by any possibility, be taxed for anything.^— That Coll Deane is 
going to the Black Hills to stay, Gashwiler to Arizona, and Ike Bate man 
and Henry Allen to Tuscarora, or some other better place ; in fact, every- 
body is getting ready to move as soon as Searle gets that bill through.^— 
Thatthe Carpenter's goods, dyes and all, are being despatchedto Arizona. 
—That finding no home off Dupont street, andno more coin, or coupe, or 
things, it is about time to follow the example of Auntie, and escape to the 
wilds of Arizona.^— That it is a righteous ending to a sad beginning.— 
That hereafter all such people will remember this case, and remembering 
it, will think twice before deliberately despoiling a happy home.— That 
to the wicked wanton there is no rest for an irreparable wrong, for 
which there was neither temptation nor palliation. So endeth the chap- 
ter. Next time we will turn over the page, and read the next one.-^ 

That J. N. T Rcntz a front seat by the week at the Bush street 

Theater.— That Gilmore should take aback seat, on account of ob- 
structing the view.— That borax quickens the pace of snails.— That 
Short knows how the medicos, old ladies, and everybody generally, are 
discussing that ten -thousand-dollar fee. 

THE TERMS OF PEACE. 
The terms of peace, as outlined in the press dispatches, clearly indi- 
cates a considerable degree of vagueness about the Russian demands, and 
are capable of great expansion, as has been pointed out in the discussion 
that has taken place in the House of Commons. This is, doubtless, partly 
due to the fact that the negotiations being carried on in the Russian bead- 
quarters are shaped by what is called " the military party," between 
whom and the civilian diplomatists, headed by Gorchakoff, there is a con- 
stant struggle for ascendency. Now, the military party naturally does not 
want peace just yet, or nut before they get to Constantinople. Having got 
inco the way of thrashing the Turks, they like it, and wish to keep at it 
as long as there are any Turks to thrash. Moreover, as it is quite certain 
that the conditions of peace will have to be settled or passed upon by a 
European conference, Russia naturally makes her terms on every point as 
high as possible, and perhaps as vague as possible, portly to frighten the 
Turks and partly to allow plenty of room for reduction. The weight of 
England's remonstrances will doubtless, now that the Turks are out of 
the way, depend on the probability of her receiving support from Austria. 
Russia dues not care for the fleet, and no army she could send to Turkey 
would make much impression, especially against the general rising of the 
Christians, which is impending and might be easily provoked. Yet it is 
certain that she could not continue to occupy Constantinople. Against 
the English fleet, that place would be simply untenable. The European 
conference shortly to assemble at the invitation of Austria, will be 
intensely interesting. 



OUR LEGISLATORS APPEALED TO. 
Mr. Johnson, the able and eloquent representative of Sacramento 
in the Assembly, has introduced an unpretending little bill, which ought 
to pass into law without one dissenting voice. It, in a single line, sup- 
plies an important omission from the codes. The practice is, un- 
fortunately, becoming too common for rascally, inhuman husbands to un- 
lawfully abandon their wives and little ones without cause. With shame 
be it said, it is most common among men possessed of more or less means. 
In such cases, the wife has usually no option but to throw her children 
upon the charity of Orphan Asylums or other public institutions, and to 
attempt to commence the world anew, as best she may. Having given 
her youth, and her all, to him who falsely swore to protect and cherish 
her, she is wantonly abandoned, and the law, as it at present stands, 
gives her no adequate redress. It is true that the law clearly enough in- 
tends that the husband shall support his wife and children, but the griev- 
ous defect is, that it does not provide effective machinery to carry out that 
intention. All that a wife may do, is to get credit, if she can, in which 
case the tradesman who in good faith supplies her with articles, deemed 
by the Court absolutely necessary, may sue the husband. But this is 
proved, in practice, to be no remedy at all. The collection of such debts 
is always difficult and unpleasant, and frequently the attempt to collect 
them fails. Hence no tradesman cares to enter upon so doubtful, and at 
best so upleasant an experiment. The law of this State, and of all civil- 
ized States, recognizes the obligation that is upon the husband to con- 
tribute towards the support of his wife and little ones. It is, indeed, a 
fundamental principle that strikes at the well-being, and even at the very 
existence of organized society. It is, therefore, right that the law should 
provide machinery for its own enforcement. That is precisely what Mr. 
Johnson's amendment does — just that and nothing more. Strange to say, 
the law provides a method whereby the wife, if she have means, may be 
made to support an incapacitated or indigent husband, but it fails to sup- 
ply an equally effective method to compel her husband to perform a like duty 
towards his wife. This is a palpable oversight, which Mr. Johnson's bill 
seeks to rectify. The value of the proposition is so self-evident that we 
cannot imagine a ground upon which it can be opposed by any Senator or 
Assemblyman, who is not contemplating a course of conduct that might 
render him amenable to the proposed amendment. Certainly, opposition 
to it would seem to raise a strong presumption in that direction. Seri- 
ously, we should be surprised and pained to observe a single vote against 
it. It must be confessed that it is a sad commentary upon our boasted 
civilization that there should be instances in our midst which loudly call 
for this addition to the law's machinery. One would have thought that 
the law of nature, supposed to be implanted in every human breast, would 
have sufficed. The savage Indian of the Plains will place his body 
between the enemy and his wife and little ones, and fight unto death if 
they are in danger. The man-eating Fijian counts his life but dross in 
the necessary defense of his family. Even the ugly serpent that crawls 
in the dust will fight man, beast or devil when its kind is in danger. It 
has remained for rare specimens of the so-called civilized man to abandon 
his own flesh and blood. Hence our Orphan Asylums demand the pro- 
posed addition to the law, so that mothers may be spared the necessity of 
seeking relief for their children from such institutions. Fathers and 
mothers demand it in the interest of the daughters they may be called 
upon to give in marriage. Many a heart-broken, abandoned wife 
demands it, in bitterness and anguish of soul. Its passage will cause 
many a sigh of relief to escape from mothers' hearts. It is furthermore 
demanded for the good of society, and in the interests of justice and right. 
In regard to a measure so obviously needed, it was to be expected that 
the press would be unanimous in its support. It is. 



TAXING THE PRESS. 
The apothegm which says, " there are other ways of killing a dog 
than by hanging him," though not a very refined one, is one especially ap- 
plicable to the endeavors of those of our politicians, who uphold the slaughter 
of all foreign imports, irrespective of the benefit they may be to the country. 
The prohibitory tariffs are, in many respects, a curse to the country, and 
a severe tax on a population that is daily becoming poorer and poorer, 
and less able to bear the restrictions placed on absolute necessities, than 
they ever were before. The poor father of a family must be content to 
pay outrageous prices for shoddy garments, because good broadcloth is 
almost excluded by the heavy duties on it, from the American market, 
and for the same reason, the dresses of his wife and children are of infer- 
ior texture. This is but one of the many instances that might be adduced 
of the effects of the protective system, which particularly affects the poor, 
and makes existence hard to bearin this country. The interests of the masses 
are ignored by those politicians who make law only for the benefit nf the 
few ; and this grievance, instead of being modified, if not altogether done 
away with, threatens to be increased by contemplated new tariffs. A 
bold and unscrupulous tax of 15 cents per pound on plain foreign type is 
now proposed, in the interest of some dozen type foundries in the United 
States. This would be equal to from 50 to 75 per cent, ad valorem, and 
30 cents per pound on job and advertising type, equal to from 50 to 120 
per cent, ad valorem, according to size and style of letter. It is simply a 
virtual prohibition of the importation of foreign manufactured type, 
from which the Government at present derives in duty the amount of 
$20,000 a year. The increased expense to the press of the country may 
easily be imagined when we state that there are 20,000 printing offices in 
the United States, employiug upward of 120,000 men. Against these, 
we have a dozen type foundries employing about 700 men. The Scotch 
type, frum its hardness and durability, lasts one third longer than the soft 
American type, and this is a fact well known to all practical printers. 
The exclusion of this type from the market would, therefore, impose a 
heavy expense in the shape of frequent reuewals. But this is not the 
only point to be considered. With the exclusion of foreign type, a 
monopoly of the business would at once follow, and the printer might 
have to pay, in the absence of foreign competition, any price that might 
be demanded for type. To exact this proposed tax would, therefore, not 
only destroy the source of revenue now derived from the foreign trade, 
but seriously cripple printing interests all over the country. This, in 
effect, would tend to narrow the power of our newspapers, inasmuch as 
cheap newspapers mean the cheap and universal education of the masses. 
We would strongly urge our bretheren of the press, no matter what their 
other opiniorjs may he, to resist the job we have denounced, by signing 

I the petition to Congress, now going round, against the contemplated ad- 

I dition to the tariff. 



Postscript 




TO TEE 

m 




CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 




Oili<-o--<50T to GIG Merchant (Street. 



VOLUME 18. 



SAK FRANCISCO, Ff B. 9 1878- 



innuBEa 3. 



'Biz. 



The heavy and continued rain storms of January have extended 
thus fu in u> tin; present month. The floods that have followed have 
rendered the reads almost impassable, and caused ■ cessation of trade and 
travel to a very considerable extent. In some places vast tracts of land 
have been submerged, and there is no doubt but that serious damage has 
been done to crops, bop fields, orchards, etc 

The PaciOc Mail steamship City of Tokio sailed for the Orient on the 

7th bast., earn ing, for cargo to (_'hina and Japan, 3,671 bbls. Flour, 1,336 

Basks Quicksilver, 345 bales Fungues, 99 rolls Leather, etc. Her treasure 

list included 9137,990 Mexican, «26.694 Trade Dollars, S900 Gold Coin, 

Silver liars, showing a total of $191,592. 

The Pacific Mail steamship Wellington is now en route to this port 
from Acapulco, with 6,000 bags Central American Coffee. 

The Bag speculation is continued. During the month of January 
nearly 5,000,000 changed hands from 9c. up to 10c. for farward delivery. 
Since then large sales of Standard, 22x36, Burlap grain sacks have been 
made, for May and June delivery, at 10^@10ic. The stock is now pretty 
well concentrated, and indications now point to lie. before the close of 
February. Stocks, it should be remembered, are large yet. Judging from 
present quotation the requirements will be equally great, as the promised 
result of the heaviest grain crop ever garnered upon the Pacific Slope. 

Quicksilver.— The price of this article has been quite unexpectedly 
advanced 2c. from the lowest ruling rate in January. Since January 1st 
we have exported 3,486 flasks by sea. The present price is 43£@44c. The 
shipment to Hongkong, per City of Tokio, 1,336 flasks, being a much 
larger quantity than was expected. 

The Coal market has been very sluggish for some time past, and in the 
absence of cargo sales we quote Australian at 87@7 25 ; English Steam, 
■ r, 50 ; West Hartley, $3 50 ; Scotch, $8@8 50 for splint ; Coast Bitumin- 
ous rules at §6@6 50. 

Coffee. — The demand is good for strictly prime Green Central Ameri- 
can at 19@19£c; Kona, 18@18£c; O. G. Java, 25c; Manila, 18i@18£c. 

Dry Goods.— We are pleased to learn that the Mission Woolen Mills 
Consolidated, through our friend Donald McLellan, has succeeded in 
making another large army contract with the Government for Blankets, 
Flannels, etc. The truth is, that Uncle Sam long since found out that 
California made woolen goods, etc., are far more serviceable, if not cheap- 
er, than the miserable shoddy stuff furnished on the Atlantic border. 

Sugar supplies come forward very sparingly. There are now two or 
more Manila cargoes fully due and anxiously looked for by the California 
Refinery. As it is, this large establishment is now running to only one- 
half its capacity. Our stocks of all kinds are running very light. Prices, 
however, are kept steady at lH@12c for Crushed and Cuba ; 9i@10c 
for Golden Coffee's; Hawaiian raws rule from 6c. to9£c, according to 
quality. 

Rice. — The 0. and O. steamship Gaelic on her last trip brought 17,- 
160 bags. No. 1 China is held at 6@6£c.; No. 2 do., 5f@6c.j Hawaiian, 
5ie. 

Metals. — The market for Pig Iron continues inert, and the same re- 
mark will apply to nearly all other kinds and descriptions. Trade is quite 
languid, ana prices for the most part entirely nominal. 

The breadstuff market rules in buyers' favor. Superfine Flour for 
export can be purchased at S4 75@S5 ; Extra Superfine, $5 25@$5 50. 
Bakers' and Family Extras rule from S6@,6 50, while choice silk-dressed 
extras for family use, such as the Golden Age, Golden Gate, Genesee 
Mills, Starr Mill, Vallejo, and Sperry's Stockton City Mills. 

"Wheat. — The export trade is continued, with free purchases at 2c. for 
cargo lots. Since January 1st we have cleared 10 cargoes, and since 1877, 
July 1st, 71 vessels with 2,821,838 ctls. Wheat, value $6,605,787; 1876, 
same time, 257 vessels with 8,937,805 ctls., value $16,138,323; 1875, same 
time, 134 vessels with 4,813,124 ctls., value §10,696,641, besides more or 
less Flour in the valuations. We have now on the berth 17 vessels, of a 
registered tonnage of 23,628 tons. There is considerable old Wheat left 
yet in the State, and millers buy lots as required at $1 90@S2 05 per ctl., 
according to quality. 

Barley. — Prices have undergone a serious decline since December last, 
and at this date we cannot quote Feed higher than SI 35, and Brewing 
$1 50 per cental. 

Oats. — By reason of free receipts from the North, prices have dropped 
to $1 40@$1 75 per cental. 

Com. — There is a moderate demand for Yellow at SI 50@S1 55 per 
t tL White is scarce at $1 75®S1 85. 



Rye — Within the last fortnight five carloads from Nebraska have 
been sold at §2 40 per ctl., but cannot now be quoted better than §2 25 
for California. 

Hay. — Small cargo sales are made daily at 813 50@S18 50 per ton. 

Oilcake MeaL — The mill price to the trade is now reduced to §40 
per ton, less 10 per cent, discount. 

Bran and Middlings.— The mill price is $22 50@§25 for the former ; 
$2o(S 27 50 for the latter. 

Hides.— The price of Dry has now dropped to 15c, awl for Wet Salted 
7A@8e. 

Tallow.— There is but little doing at present. Price, 6J@7c; Re- 
fined, 9c. 

Hops. — The market is very languid. A sale of 150 bales common is re- 
ported at 5£c. Choice are scare at 8@10c. 

Wool.— The supply is well nigh exhausted, pending the arrival of the 
Spring clip. Last sales Fall, 12@13c; Oregon, 18@20c 

Potatoes.— Strictly choice are worth 2$@2fc.; fair to good, 1£(2 lfc. 

Dairy Products. — The supply is more free, and fresh grass Butter in 
rolls command 28c to 32c. ; fair to good, 25c to 274c Cheese is scarce at 
18@20c. Eggs command 32J@35c. 

Fruit. — The market continues to be liberally supplied with Oregon 
Apples and California Oranges and Lemons of choice quality— fresh and 
nice. 

Stock Sales. — Transactions in securities for the week, so far as made 
public, embrace the following: 500 shares S. F. Gas Light, 94f@95; 200 
shares Spring Vallev Water, 91£@9H; 100 shares Bank of California, 
90^; 50 shares S. F. Dry Dock, private. 

Freights.— But few engagements have been made during the week. 
Wheat charters to the United Kingdom mayenow be quoted at 45@50s., 
for wood and iron vessels respectively. The last engagements coming to 
our knowledge was at 47s. 6d., for a small British iron ship. 

Beerbohm's Telegram.— London and Liverpool, Feb. 8, 1878.— 
Liverpool Spot Wheat, good demand; No. 2 Spring Off Coast, 49s.@49s. 
6d.; Do. for Shipment, 47s. 6d.; Red Winter Off Coast, 52s. 6d,@53s.j 
California do., 58s.; Do., Nearly Due, 58s. 6d.; Do., Just Shipped, 56s.; 
Do. Club, 12s. 7d.@12s. 10d.; Do. Average, 12s.5d.@12s. 8d.; Red West- 
ern Spring, 10s. 8d.@lls. 2d.; Liverpool Spot Average Wheat, 12s. 3d.@ 
12s. 8d. Do. Club, 12s. 7d.@13s.; English Country Markets firm, dearer; 
French Country Markets, steady; American Flour in London, 28s.; 
Mixed American Corn, for Shipment, 25s.@25s. 6d. ; in Liverpool, 27s * 
Consuls, 95f@95 7-16; Sterling Exchange, 82i@84£; Gold, 2. Less ex- 
citement yesterday. Improvement maintained. Quotations unsettled. 

Latest from the Merchant's Exchange.— New York, Feb. 8th, 
1878.— Gold opened at 102; 11 a.m., at 102; 3 p.m, at 102. United 
States Bonds — Five-twenties of 1867, 105 ; 1881, 103§. Sterling Ex- 
change, 4 82i@4 844, short. Pacific Mail, 22£. Wheat, Si 30@S1 44, dull. 
Western Union, 76§. Hides, 19£@20£. Oil— Sperm, SI 01@S1 03. Win- 
ter Bleached, 63@72. Wool— Spring, fine, 22A@33 ; Burry. 12i@16 ; 
Pulled, 30@40. Fall Clips, 18@23 ; Burry, 16@25. London, Feb. "8th.— 
Liverpool Wheat Market, 12s. 3d. @ 12s. 8d. Club, 12s. 7d. @ 13s. 
United States Bonds, 104§@103£. Consols, 953 ; 12:30 p.m., 95s ; 2 p.m., 
95 7-16 ; 4 P.M., 95 11-16. 

More Sweetening. — We congratulate Claus Spreckles and his asso- 
ciates upon the timely arrival of the German bark Melusini, sixty days 
from Manila, with a full cargo of Sugar, 46,508 bags for the California 
Refinery. This is a very opportune arrival, and will be in season to pre- 
vent this large establishment from shutting down for want of working 
material. 

Freight Engagements.— The latest Wheat charters embrace the fol- 
lowing : Br. ship Amana, 1277 tons, Liverpool, £2 10s.; Br. ship Golden 
Gate, 899 tons, Liverpool (prior to arrival), £2 7s. 6d.; Br. ship Spring- 
wood, 990 tons, same port, £2 7s. 6d. At date shipowners are demand- 
ing enhanced rates for grain charters. 

Ores, Base Bullion, Etc.— The steamship South Carolina, for New 
York, via Panama, carried of Base Bullion 205,200 lbs.; Pig Lead, 120,000 
lbs.; Silver Ore, 89,812 lbs. The Granada, for Panama, also carried, en 
route to New York, Base Bullion, 617,487 lbs..; Pig Lead, 440 250 lbs 
and Ores, 44,250 lbs. 

From New York. — Ships Conqueror and Ocean King, both from 
New York, are to hand with well assorted cargoes to George Howes & Co. 



POSTSCRIPT TO THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Feb. 9, 1878. 



CHILDREN'S PARTIES. 

[Sketches from Mayfair.] 

It is pitiful to see how Children's Parties have followed the melan^ 
ckoly rule which takes all heartiness out of their elders' enjoyment by 
overloading pleasure with ornament and luxury. We might, at least, 
have left to them their simple joys, and forborne to civilize them into 
critical discontent and ungenerous fastidiousness. Childhood is top pre- 
cious a thing to allow it to be crushed to pieces by that steam-roller of 
society which levels all the pleasures of adults into mere indifferentism. 
Nil admirari is a fine doctrine for the disappointed cynic, but it is melan- 
choly to read such an inscription over the doors of our schoolrooms. We 
offer alLgifts to our young people ; but if we take from them their youth, 
what is the good of all our gifts? Thackeray, whose genuine admira- 
tion of and sympathy with children "may be summed up in a single ex- 
pression of his, that he never could see a schoolboy without longing to 
give him a sovereign, was wont to say that of all theatrical entertain- 
ments, he most enjoyed a pantomime. Not that he had anyfaith in fair- 
ies, or cared much to see the dazzling halls of bliss." These sights had 
their attractions for others. He went to see the children laugh. But we 
are by degrees improving this source of adult enjoyment out of juvenile 
society. Some of our young people find it so easy to be bored' that a 
laugh is a luxury. 

An old-fashioned notion that the simplest plan is to bring all the 
young people together, and let them amuse themselves, turns out to be a 
complete failure. This is not at all what is expected, and even their 
parents are disappointed with the fiasco. That an elaborate toilette 
should end in blind -man's -buff is intolerable ; and so a Children's Party 
only differs from a full-dress ball in the hight of the dancers. _ The little 
lady starts for her night's dissipation when she ought to. be in bed, and 
has the cares of *aaturity early on her mind, lest her card Bhonld not be 
filled up in the evening. She reproduces the talk of her mother's bou- 
doir in the ball-room — and can criticise the dress of her vis a vis after the 
best models of well-bred disparagement. She distinguishes between the 
dreamy pleasures of a waltz and the more athletic enjoyment of a galop. 
She knows the attractions of a " supper set," and can flirt with an air of 
ingenue simplicity which might suggest very valuable hints to her elder 
sister. She has a poor opinion of square dances, knows that her dress 
may get torn in the last figure of a Lancers, and finds one of " the bores 
of dancing a quadrille " is, that the figures are always changing. With 
sedulous care she keeps her programmes, and of malice prepense is able to 
lose her pocket-handkerchief. She is quite up to the method by which 
an undesirable partner may be courteously avoided, and is careful to see 




how a gentleman dances before she permits his autograph on her card. 
When the evening is over, she knows she has utilized her time, and has 
engaged herself three or four deep for the next children's ball at some 
neighbor's house. A dance in January is not forgotten in the ensuing 
month, and her correspondence on the 14th of February has reference to 
some remembered event in the night's entertainment. She has a fine 
contempt for her own brothers, and with characteristic precocity, affects 
a terror of schoolboys generally, but finds herself quite equal to sustain 
prolonged conversation with her elder sister's admirer. That worshiper 
having at last withdrawn to the more appropriate shrine of his devotion, 
she admits to a subsequent partner that all the time she was bored. 
There can be, she says, no real pleasure in taking to an engaged man. It 
is hard in these days to understand what Lord Byron could have meant 
when he granted the charms of " a budding miss," but found her shy and 
awkward at first coming out. Dates in a young lady's history are always 
difficult matter to deal with, but it is especially hard just now to know 
when a girl really does "come out." It used to be rather an event in 
the family, and the transition from the school-room to the ball-room was 



marked, sudden, and abrupt. But conditions now are changed, or rather 
the course of them seems inverted. All the elder sisters go to school, 
some to cookery, some to what has been called art -needier worfc ; some to 
what is called art without the needlework; and some to the accident 
ward,- if not actually to the operating theater* In the meantime, the 
younger ones are found in the drawing-room or the opera box. Even 
theatrical managers have felt the ehaiige, and pantomimes are out of 
fashion, fairy tales a nuisance, and the Clown a bore. The Fairies them- 
selves cease to impose upon the nursery, and the wonders of harlequin's 
wand are the result of thoroughly ascertained causes. Chilaren have be- 
come juveniles, and the little girl who told her mother she had been 
flirting, and defined that amusement as "a feeling in the mind," turns 
out to be a representative rather than an exception. 

14 The nursery still lisps out in all they utter, 
Besides, they always smell of bread and butter." 
A note must be added to future editions of " Beppo " to explain Lord 
Byron's meaning in this obscure couplet. It certainly has no reference to 
the "budding miss" of the present day. 

We must do justice to the other sex, however, and admit that boys are 
rather less plastic in the hands of juvenile fashion. Our little masters do 
not readily become petits maitres. The nature of the British schoolboy, 
happily, does not admit of such possibilities. He retains the invaluable 
gift of youth longer, and postpones the inevitable period of boredom 
until his schooldays have come to an end. He has brought with him 
from the scene of studies an excellent appetite, and leisure time in his 




holidays. There is a blunt honesty, directness, and, if you will, a brutal- 
ity about the British schoolboy which still holds out against the effemi- 
nacy of an over-luxurious century. Life at public schools keeps him 
young if it keeps him rather ignorant, and he comes back to us at Christ- 
mas what he has. left us at Midsummer, unmistakably a schoolboy. 
Still, even in his case, it is but a matter of time. The simple pleasures 
cease to please. He becomes self-asserting and self-important. He is 
soigne in his dress, and deliberate in the selection of his companions. He 
becomes selfish and dainty in the choice of his pleasures, constantly re- 
quiring more and more excitement. He will not put up with a single 
evening's amusement. He prefers dinners to dances, and takes horse ex- 
ercise with parties of his friends in order to enjoy the social pleasures of 
a ride. 

We are far from saying that the types indicated are general. It would 
be very 6ad if they were. But we think they are freely to be met with, 
and that the number of them is on the increase. Every year will tell in 
one direction or the other, and it rests with ourselves to check or acceler- 
ate their progress. We see on the French stage what the French school- 
boy may become ; we hear on all sides to what our own young people are 
advancing. We repeat to ourselves that the child is father of the man, 
and take the sentence as revealing a deep truth. Can we not leave fash- 
ion and frivolity, if they miist govern society, for club exquisites and 
Bitualistic young ladies at skating rinks ? A dandified schoolboy and a 
worldly-wise little girl are neither pleasant sights to look at nor pleasant 
prospects to speculat e upon. ■ 

PROTECTION TOR THE WIFE AND MOTHER. 
The "Alta" says: "The amendment to section 137 of the Civil 
Codes, printed in the legislative proceedings in the Alta of Wednesday, is 
what is needed to protect the wife and mother from the heartless brute 
who, from no cause, deserts his wife and children. The man who goes be- 
fore an officer of the law, or minister of the Gospel, and enters into the 
bonds of matrimony, is in honor and in duty bound to support her, and 
that duty becomes intensely sacred if she has children, for a woman is, 
unfortunately, nearly helpless at all times, and with the burden of little 
children demanding her motherly care and attention, is made unable to 
gain a livelihood, even by the lightest labor. There has been enough of 
this kind of recklessness in carelessly ignoring sacred obligations, and it is 
about time to come to a standstill and take a new departure. The pro- 
posed amendment to the Codes is to compel a truant or recreant husband 
to support his offspring and a deserted wife. This is as it should be, and 
the amendment will have a salutary effect when passed by the Legislature." 



I, 1878 



POSTSCRIPT TO THE s.\N KKANCISC'O NEWS LETTER. 




(&t%Mf#mw 



OTED TO THE LEADING INTERESTS OF' 



28 



SAN FRAN0IS00, SAT 



or the Si»n FrMiicUco News Letter, Merchant Street, 

- 



THE STORY OP AN INVENTION. 
It may not be generally known that an important invention in con- 

.1 with the manufacture of carpets originated as follows : An op- 
■veaver, in one of the largest establishments in this country, was 
engaged in weaving a carpet that in its finished stage would appear as a 
velvet pile. At that period this description of carpet was woven much 
I in the manner of Brusstds, the loops being afterwards cut by hand— a slow 
and costly process. These loops are formed by the insertion of wires of 
the requisite thickness to form the loop ; they are then withdrawn. This 
weaver— whether by cogitation, or as the result of a bright thought —came 
to the conclusion that if these wires were so constructed as, on being with- 
drawn, to cut the loops, thus instantly completing the formation of the 
pile, it would be a great saving of labor and time, and a great economy. 
Taking one of the rods, he changed its form to the required shape, ground 
a knife edge upon it, took it to his looms, and inserted it into the web — 
all the while maintaining strict secrecy — and with some degree of excite- 
ment watched its weaving down until the moment for its withdrawal. 
This came, the rod was drawn out, the loops were cut, and the experiment 
was a perfect success, the pile being cut with great evenness. The weaver, 
with a shrewdness often wanting in inventors, doubled up the rod and hid 
it away, wove down the line of cut loops upon the roll, then " knocked 
off," or stopped his loom, and proceeded to the office of the mill, where he 
demanded to see the principal. The clerk demurred to this, asking if he 
himself could not do all that was required ; but no, the weaver persisted. 
Then the manager tried, but with the same result ; only the principal 
would suit the weaver. The employer was informed of the operative's 
persistence in determining to see him ; so he at once ordered him to be ad- 
mitted. This was done, and the weaver stepped into the well-furnished 

a ndsomely-carpeted office of the manufacturer. His employer ad- 
dressed him : "' Well, John " (for so we will call him), " what is it you 
want ?'* '* Well, maister, I've getten summut yo mun hev," replied John. 
" Wudn't yo like a way ut makkin t' loom cut th' velvet piles ?" continued 
the weaver. " Yes ! that I would !" replied the employer ; "and I will 
reward any man handsomely who brings me a plan of doing it," added 
he. "Awm yore mon, then," said the operative. "Wod'll yo gi'me?" 
he further asked. After some further conversation a bargain was struck, 
and a Bum agreed agreed upon, which the weaver should be entitled to 
claim in the event of his plan for automatically cutting the pile of the 
carpet being a success. Arrangements were made for its trial ; the weaver 
made his preparations ; the master, the manager, and one or two confi- 
dential employe's gathered around the loom upon which the experiment 
had to be made, all others being sent outside the range of observation. 
The new form of wires were inserted, woven down and withdrawn, leav- 
ing a well-cut pile upon the face of the carpet. The weaver had won his 
reward, for it was honorably paid. An annuity of £100 was settled upon 
him, which he continued to enjoy until within a recent date, and, for any- 
thing we know to the contrary, may be enjoying yet. He retired from 
the weaving shed, determined to spend the rest of his days in ease and 
comfort. His employer secured by patent the benefits of his invention, 
it being one, amongst several others, which contributed to place that man- 
ufacturing establishment in the foremost rank in the trade, whilst itsown- 

: lined wealth and social eminence as the reward of their prudent 
enterprise. — Textile Manufacturer. 

Despite appearances, a very serious difference exists between Don 
Carlos and his wife. The Pretender, during his late visit to that magic 
quarter, the East, was unable to resist the blue eyes and seductive glances 
of certain fair Circassians- The sweet temper of Donna Margarita has 
been considerably soured by several escapades, in the most Catholic and 
other European countries, but this " Infidel " liason is more than enough 
to engulf the wholo of the milk of kindness of forgiving woman. 



Last month G9 ships left the Mersey with 2,100 emigrants, a decrease 
of 932 compared with November. During the year just closed 54,S73 em- 
igrants sailed from Liverpool, a decrease of upwards of 11,000 compared 
with the previous year. The English emigrants numbered 32,407, Scotch 
425, Irish 5.021, foreigners 14,288, the nationalities of the remainder not 
being described. 

The Rev. Win. A. Soott, D. D., L L. D., will preach Sunday morn- 
ing and evening, at the usual hours, in St. John's Presbyterian Church, 
Post street, between Mason and Taylor streets. Public cordially invited. 
Sunday school and Bible classes, 9£ a. m.; praise service, <U p. m. 



Condensed News of the Week. 

LOCAL. 

Monday, February 4th. -Tbi 18 guns, 

is expected ben from Japan waters, on route for Central Ann 

Tuesday, 5th. The Director "f the Mint lias extended the time for 
of trade dollars at the San BVanoiaoo Mint, to the LStfa instant, in 
order that bankexi may be ably to (ill ordsra for export to China and the 
■ 

Wednesday, 6th.— "While the tug W"t,r Witch waa lyio al< 
the whip Syrtn, on Monday. ( luptain Johnson, of the tug, fell overl 

me near being crushed to death between the two vessels. — »The 
charges of embezzlement against Nellie Firmin, alias Mrs. Thomas H. 
Blytno, were to-day continued till Tuesday next. 

Thursday, 7th. — One of the new California street dummies was drawn 
up the hill yesterday by a six-horse team. As soon as the weather will 
permit, the cable will be laid.—— The Los Angeles distillery case came up 
in the United States District Court this morning, on motion of the Gov- 
ernment for a new trial, and United States Attorney Coghlan was allowed 
ten days in which to file a bill of exceptions. 

Friday, 8th.— It is reported that A. W. Roysdon, Prosecuting Attor- 
ney of the City Criminal Court, is about to resign that office to become 
Second Assistant District Attorney, the position recently created by the 
Legislature.*— —In the City Criminal Court to-day, on motion of the 
Prosecuting Attorney, the sureties of Kearney, "Wellock, Knight and the 
other agitators, were released from any further responsibility, the defend- 
ants being allowed to go on their own recognizance.^— ■Yesterday morn- 
ing three of the large stained glass windows in Grace Church were broken. 
A reward of $50 has been offered for the arrest of the miscreant who did 
the mischief. 

TELEGRAPHIC. 

Monday, Feb. 4th.— New Yoiik, Feb. 4th.— The Times* "Washington 
special thinks a majority of the House Committee on Elections, headed 
by Springer, who will conduct the Wiggintou case in the House, reported 
against Pacheco.— —It is hinted that the President has determined, if the 
Silver hill posses by an overwhelming majority in both Houses of Con- 
gress, to sign it. 

Tuesday, 5th.— Washington, Feb. 5th.— Senator Conkling to-day 
presented petitions of a large number of citizens of many counties in New 
York in favor of remonetization of silver. Referred. ^— New York, Feb. 
4th. — Ex-Senator Harry Genet, of Harlem Courthouse notoriety, and one 
of the ring fugitives, surrendered yesterday morning, and gave bail in the 
sum of §25,000. — Washington, Feb. 5th. — Wallace, from the Commit- 
tee on Finance, reported with amendment a bill introduced by him some 
time ago to authorize a long bond for investment for savings. 

"Wednesday, 6th.— New York, Feb. 6th.— The National Rifle Asso- 
ciation has decided to invite a convention of all rifle clubs in the country 
at Creedmoor next spring.— —A defalcation of 9100,000, by a teller of the 
Bank of North America, has been discovered.— —The examination of Re- 
ceiver Jewett, of the Erie Railway, was begun to-day. 

Thursday, 7th. —Washington, Feb. 7th.— The House, by a strict 
party vote, to-day unseated Pacheco and declared Wiggiuton, the Demo- 
cratic contestant, entitled to a seat.— New York, Feb. 7th. — A Tribune 
Washington special says : A prominent New Orleans man has arrived 
here who declares that the Returning Board prosecutions are instigated 
by Tilden.^— Bismarck (Dakota), Feb. 7th. — Two hundred and fifty re- 
cruits for General Miles arrived here yesterday, and immediately took up 
their march of 400 miles .for FortBuford and Tongue river. 

Friday, Feb. 8th.— New York, Feb. 8th.— Cardinal McCloskey 
leaves for Rome to-morrow in the steamship Cit;i of New York to take 

fart in the election of a successor to Pope Pius IX.— —The Times says : 
t is said that ex-Governor Walker, of Virginia, will remove to Califor- 
nia upon the expiration of his term in Congress.— —Washington, Feb. 
8th. — Subscriptions to date of the four per cent, loan aggregate nearly 
£3,000,000.— New York, Feb. 8th.— The Times' Cleveland special says 
that Senator Wade is growing weaker. 

FOREIGN. 

Monday, Feb. 4th.— Belgrade, Feb. 4th. — The Government having 
received a dispatch from Russian headquarters announcing that an armis- 
tice has been signed, has ordered the different Servian commanders to 
stop hostilities.— —London, Feb. 4th. — Nine millions of people are re- 
ported destitute in Northern China. The Foreign Relief Committee ap- 
peals to England and America for aid. 

Tuesday, 5th. — London, Feb. 5th. — A Paris correspondent says lie 
has received on high authority some confirmation of the rumor that Rus- 
sia is negotiating for the surrender of the whole Turkish fleet. — A St. 
Petersburg dispatch says: The cessation of hostilities has produced more 
anxiety than rejoicing, 

Wednesday, 6th.— London, Feb. 6th. --A special from Berlin says: 
Roumania insists on having Dobrudseha without ceding Bessarabia to 
RuBBia.-^— Intelligence has reached St. Petersburg that Bey Kull, Emir 
of Kasbgar, has arrived at Tashkend. He admits his inability to oppose 
the Chinese. 

Thursday, 7th.— London, Feb. 7th— 1:30 P. M.— No confirmation has 
been received at Russian or Turkish Embassies of the reported Russian 
occupation of Constantinople.— —Rome, Feb. 7th— 6 p. si. — The Pope 
died at 4:")/ this afternoon.— LONDON, Feb. 7th. — A special to the 
Standard} from Pesth, announces that Turkish men-of-war on the Danube 
have been surrendered to Russia. 

Friday, 8th.— London, Feb. 8th. — A special from Constantinople, 
February 1st, by way of Syria says: It is stated that Grand Duke Nicl 
and staff will come to Constantinople during the armistice. "A 
meeting will be held at Cremorne Gardens Saturday, to indorse the Gov- 
ernment's foreign policy. ■■■-Bomb, Feb. 8th.— The Pope's last act was 
to provide for the continuance of his servants' salaries and pensions to their 
widows. 



POSTSCRIPT TO THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Feb. 9, 1878. 



HIGHEST STOCK QUOTATIONS FOB WEEK ENDING EEB. 8, 1378. 

Compiled by Hopkins & Macfarlane, 22S Montgomery St. 



Name of Mine. 



Argenta 

Andes 

""Alpha 

*Alla 

Alps 

* Bullion 

*Beleher 

Best & Belcher. 

Benton 

Bodie 

Cois Imperial. . 

Crown Point 

Chollar 

California 

Con- Virginia... 

Caledonia 

Confidence 

*De Frees 

Eureka Con 

Exchequer... . 
*Gould & Curry 

Gila 

Grand Prize 

'Hale&Norcross 
Julia 

* Justice 

Jackson 

Kentuck 

*Leopard 

*Lady Wash*n ... 

♦Leviathan 

Leeds 

'Mexican 

Modoc 

Manhattan 

Northern Belle . . 

Ophir 

Overman 

Raymond & Ely. 

Rye Patch 

♦Savage 

"Sierra Nevada .. 

Silver Hill 

Seg Belcher 

Solid Silver 

Succor 

Silver King, Ar'a 
Silv. King South. 
Trojan 

* Union Con 

*Utah 

^Yellow Jacket.. 



Sat. 


MOKDAT- 


Tuesday. 


Wednzsdt 


Thuesd't. 


Feidat. 


JL 


A.H. 


P.M. 


a.m. 


P M. 


A.M. 


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Assessments are now due on the Stocks ahove marked thus * 



T 



PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 
be Company's steamers will sail as follows at 12 91.: 

CHINA, March 1st, for YOKOHAMA and HONGKONG. 

GEORGIA, February 19th, for PANAMA and NEW YORK, calling at ACAPULCO, 
LA L1BERTAD, SAN JOSE DE GUATEMALA and PUNTA ARENAS. Hereafter 
the Panama Steamers will leave on the 5th and 19th of each month. Tickets to and 
from Europe by any line for sale at the lowest rates. 

AUSTRALIA, February 18th, at 12 o'clock, m., or on arrival of the English 
mails, for HONOLULU, AUCKLAND and SYDNEY. fclO additional is charged for 
passage in Upper Saloon. 

CITY OF PANAMA, February 9th, for VICTORIA, PORT TOV7NSEND, SEAT- 
TLE, ac.d TACOMA, connecting at TACOMA with Northern Pacific Railroad for 
PORTLAND, Oregon. Tickets must be purchased before 11 a.m. on day of sailing, 
at 222 Montgomery street, or at "Wharf Office. For freight or passage apply at the 
office, corner of First and Brannan streets. 

Feb. 9. WILLIAMS, BLANCHARD & CO., Agents. 

OCCIDENTAL AND OMENTAL STEAMSHIP COMPANY, 

For Japan and China* leave wharf, corner First and Bran- 
nan streets, at noon, for YOKOHAMA AND HONGKONG, connecting at 
Yokohama with Steamers for Shanghai. 

GAELIC Thursdav, Feb. 21st. 

OCEANIC Tuesday, Dec. 18th, and Saturday, March 16th. 

BELGIC Tuesday, Jan. 22d, and Tuesday, April 16th. 

Cabin Plans on Exhibition, and Passage Tickets for sale at No. 2 New Mont- 
gomery street. For Freight, apply at the Pacific Mail Steamship Company's Wharf. 
T. H. GOODMAN, General Passenger Agent. 
GEORGE H. BRADBURY, President. Feb. 9. 

PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

Steamers of this Company will sail from Broadway Wharf 
for PORTLAND, Oregon), every 5 days, direct, and for LOS ANGELES, SANTA 
BARBARA, SANTA CRUZ, SAN DIEGO, SAN LUIS OBISPO and other NORTH- 
ERN and SOUTHERN COAST PORTS, leaving SAN FRANCISCO about every 
third day. 

For Day and Hour of Sailing, see the Company's Advertisement in the San Fran- 
cisco Daily Papers. 

t^~ Great Reduction in Rates of Fare to Portland, Oregon. 
Ticket Office, No. 314 Montgomery Street, near Pine. 
GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Agents, 
Dec. 22. No. 10 Market street. 

INTERMEDIATE STEAMER FOE HONOLULU. 

The first-class Steamship "St. Pan!" will perform the In- 
termediate Mail Service to HONOLULU on the following'schedule : 
FBOM SAN FRANCISCO. j FROM HONOLULU. 

January 24th. February.... . '. 5th. 

February ,,, 19th. [March .......5th. 

For freight or passage, having superior accommodations, apply to 

WILLIAMS, BLANCHARD & CO., 
Feb. 2. 218 California street, or corner First and Brannan streets. 



STATE 



STATEMENT 
OF T HE ro?fT >T'nov a nbj.ffat-r s of THE 
IF 



^ri, and abrupt. 
„ of them seems inverted. 



-r, I .... 'RANGE 

But conditions now are — 



CO., 

, ui lEuiier 

All the elder sisters go to school, 



jo cookery, some to what bas been called artneedle^woi'k ; some to 
tvhat is called art without the needlework; and some to the accident 
ward; if riot actually to the operating theater* In the meantime, the 
younger ones are found in the drawing-mom or the opera-box. Even 
theatrical managers have felt the change, and pantomimes are out of 
fashion, fairy tales a nuisance, and the Clown a bore. The Fairies them- 
selves cease to impose upon the nursery, and the wonders of harlequin's 
wand are the result of thoroughly ascertained causes. Children have be- 
come juveniles, and the little girl who told her mother she had been 
flirting, and defined that amusement as "a feeling in the mind," turns 
out to be a representative rather than an exception. 

" The nursery still lispsout in all they utter, 
Besides, they always smell of bread and butter." 
A note must be added to future editions of " Beppo " to explain Lord 
Byron's meaning in this obscure couplet. It certainly has no reference to 
the " budding miss " of the present day. _ / 

"We must do justice to the other sex, however, and admit that boys are 
rather less plastic in the hands of juvenile fashion. Oar little masters do 
not readily become petits jnaitres. The nature of the British schoolboy 
happily, does not admit of such possibilities. He retains the invaluab) 
gift of youth longer, and postpones the inevitable period of boredo 
until his schooldays have come to an end. He has brought with h; 
from the scene of studies an excellent appetite, and leisure time in 



■ --■ wi^ ;.-■ -.,JJ5 10 

Gross premiums on fire risks running more than one year, §2,846 76, rein- 
surance pro rata i §68 40 

Gross premiums ou marine and inland navigation risks, §2,36© 77, rein- 
surance 100 perceut 2 366 77 

Gross premiums on marine time risks,, 637,705 93, reinsurance 50 per cent. ls|S52 96 

Cash dividends declared to stockholders, remaining unpaid 126 00 

Marine notes payable 2 515 20 

Claim in litigation '.'.'.'.['. 972 00 



Total liabilities §147,998 03 

Ineeme. 

Net cash actually received for fire premiums 

Net easb actually received for marine premiums 

Bills and notes received for premiums <> 

Received for interest on bonds and mortgages 4' 

Received for interest and dividends on bonds, stocks, loans and' from all 

other sources § Qg± 40 

Bents 12*420 00 



.§208,957 51 



0(58 35 
167 85 



Total income.. 



.$312,794 46 



Expenditures, 

Net amount paid for fire losses (including §13,500 losses of previous years). §90,324 00 
Net amount paid fur marine losees (including §11,939 86 losses of previous 
years 



53,439 12 
55,874 00 
37,033 96 
30,145 00 

26,924 48 



Dividends to stockholders *'". '.'...['. 

Paid or allowed for commissions or brokerage ..„.!. 

Paid for salaries, fees and other charges for officers, clerks, etc. . . ." .II." ."." 
Paid for State, national and local taxes, rent, Fire Patrol, advertising, 
printing, discount on silver, and all other expenses 

Total expenditures §293,740 67 

Losses 

, , . Fire. Marine. 

Incurred during the year §82,352 70 §46,692 25 

Risks and Premiums. 



Net amount of Risks written dur- 
ing the year 

Net amount of Risks expired 
during the year 

Net amount in foree Decem- 
ber 31, 1877 

Risks written in State of Cali- 
fornia 



Fire Risks. 



§15,707,676 
16,301,966 
14,404,467 
14,133,795 



Premiums. 



§244,876 19 
257,192 13 
223,076 96 
202,842 67 



Marine 
Risks. 



$1,370,277 

1,488,619 

475,592 

1,370,277 



Premiums. 



§79,909 50 
86,095 85 
40,072 70 
79,909 50 



A. J. BRYANT, President. 
CHAS. H. CUSHING, Secretary. 
Office 213 and 220 Sansome street, in Company's building. 



SATJCELITO FERRY. 

Winter Arrangement.— Ou and after Xovember 5th, 1877, 
a swift and commodious steamer will leave as follows : 
San Francisco, foot of Davis street : 8:45 A.M., R. R.; 10:45 A.M.; *3-30pm ■ 5-00 
P.M., R. R. Saucelito : 8:00 A.M., R. R. ; 9:30 a.m. ; 1:00 p.m. ; 4:15 p.m. R. R.' 
Sunday Time.— San Francisco, foot of Davis street : 10:00 a.m., R. R.- 12-00 

11:00 a.m. ; 1:00 p.m.'; 3:00* p.ti. ; 



Saucelito : 9:00 a.m. 



2:00 p.m. ; 4:30 p.m 
and 5:20 p.m., R, R. 
On MONDAY MORNING an Extra Trip from from San Francisco at 7:00 A M 
♦This trip at 2:00 p.m. on SATURDAY. 

LANDS for sale in lots to suit. Inquire at the office of the Company No 320 San- 
some street, or of MAURICE DORE & CO., No. 410 Pine street. 

Feb. 9. FRANCIS AVERY, Superintendent. 



OREGON STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

The Only Direct Mail Line to Portland, Oregon.— Regular 
Steamers to PORTLAND from San Francisco every FIVE DAYS until further 
notice— Steamships GEORGE W. ELDER, CITY OF CHESTER, AJAS, and STATE 
OF OREGON (now building), connecting at Portland, Oregon, with Steamers and 
Railroads and their connecting Stage lines for all points in Oregon, Washington and 
Idaho Territories, British Columbia and Alaska. This Company has the exclusive 
right of selling Through Tickets at Reduced Rates over the Oregon Central and Or- 
egon and California Railroads in Oregon, and EMIGRANTS to Oregon furnished with 
Certificates entitling them to travel at Half Rates over these roads. 

Caution.— This is the only line running NEW IRON STEAMSHIPS with every 
modern improvement for the comfort and safety of passengers. 

Nov. 3. K. YAN OTERENDORP, Agent, 210 Battery street. 



The Special Organ of "Marriott's Aoroplano Navigation Co."--Fred. Marriott, Patentee. 

Prl«~ per Copr- 10 C. ESTABLISHED JULY. 20. 1-S6. I Annual Sub.orlption, 8S. 







(California 



riisjer'. 



DEVOTED TO THE LEADING INTERESTS OF CALIFORNIA AND THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Vol. 28 



SAN FRANOISOO, SATURDAY, FEB. 16, 1878. 



No. 4, 



Ofllrr of lh«- Krii KriUMl-n. \chi I.i-IIit, Men hunt Street, 
51.'., S«n Francisco. 



(lOLD B 
» • 
per cent di 



)910 -Sii.vku BaBS- *, disc. Treasury 

tog, W|. Mexican Dollars, 5^tVG 
Dollars, l<2 C per cent. 



3~ Exchange on New York, ^percent for Gold; Omrency, l&@lf per 

miam. On London, Bankers, 49|d.@ ; Connnercial, 

49J<L(S 50d. Paris, 5 francs per dollar. Telegrams, 60-100@| per cent. 

W Latest price of Gold at New York, Feb. 15, at 3 p.m., 102|. Latest 
price of Sterling, 482(51484. 

9" Price "f Money here, g@l per cent, per month — bank rate. In the 
open market, 1(8 11. Demand active. 

PRICES OF LEADING STOCKS AND GOVSRNMENT BONDS. 
c ***incjsco February 15, 1878. 



TJ. -68.. 

N 

S. t ■ K ■ 

S. F. . .t 

. Bond* — 
Yuba Qountj (kinds, 8a. ... 
Ban Uateo Oo Bonds, 7s. . . 

S. F. <"::ts Light Oo 

National 0~ irk ic Trust Co 
Boring Valley Water Co — 



Hid 


4f£ttf 


104 


10C 




H 


103 


Ml 


105 


108 


i(i 


28 I 


or 


— [ 


100 


— 


03 


SH 


77+ 


80 


01 


92 | 



Blocks and Bowls. 

Omnibus Kattroad Co 

Ceutnvl ItaUroadCo 

N. B. and Mission R. K. Co. 
Fnmt st..M. & O. U. U. Co. 

Firennui's Fund Ins. Oo 

Onion Insurance Co 

Pacific Bank 

The Bank of California 

Central Pacific Railroad 



70 


75 


70 


724 


22 


25 


95 


100 


108 


112 


110 


US 


III 


(IS 


85 


80 



LATEST "WAR TELEGRAMS. 

London, Feb. 15th. — In consequence of orders from the Government 
for cast-steel tubes for large ordnance, the works at Sheffield have re- 
1 full time with an increased number of hands. The Government 
has also ordered a large number of rifle barrels at Sheffield. Some of the 
in Woolwich arsenal are going 1 day and night. The outer basin of 
Woolwich dockyard is being cleared so as to be ready to receive vessels 
requiring repair in an emergency. The Admiral Superintendent at 
Malta has been ordered to report as to vacant barrack accommodations, 
as it may become desirable to station reserve seamen at Malta ready to 
draft to the fleet aa required, 

Constantinople, Felt. 15th.— Vice Admiral Hornby's flagship, the Alex- 
andria, the Timeroire, Sultan and Achilles, arrived off Princess Island at 
8 o'clock this morning. The Agincourt and Swiftsure remain at Gallipoli. 
The Bateigh, ffotapur (iron ram), and Ruby are at Bessika Bay. 

Constantinople special says : There is much excitement and confusion 
here over the entry of the Russian soldiers. No disturbances or violations 
of the peace are reported as yet. 

Constantinople, Feb. 15th.— The British Ambassador has telegraphed 
to Lord Derby that the Sultan has received a dispatch from the Czar 
stating that his troops would occupy the neighborhood of Constantinople 
in a friendly spirit, and with the same object — " the protection of his sub- 
jects" - as the British fleet was sent to do. 

LONDON, Feb. lath. — The Times says: The significance of sending: the 
fleet to Constantinople is even greater than its immediate import. A very 
powerful force is now in position to maintain our interests in the Bos- 
porus and the Dardanelles. The Times hopes Russia will admit the force 
of Lord Derby's protest, and will not, from perfectly sentimental mo- 
tives, onkr the Russian troops to take up a menacing position, which, it 
says, is wholly unnecessary for the protection of their real interests. 

BERLIN, Feb. 15th.— Bismarck is reported to be prepared to give a full 
and clear explanation of his Eastern policy, in answer to a question about 
to be put in Parliament. The Emperor is understood to be prepared, in 
case of need, to tender hie good offices to England and Russia, with a 
view to the preservation of peace, but he is not inclined to act in any way 
as arbitrator. 



The amount of bullion withdrawn from the Bank of England on 
balance yesterday was unusually large, equal to ¥2,500.000 in American 
Gold. It ia thought Germans are selling United States Bonds in London. 
Fine Silver is quite weak at 53£d., though the German Government was 
recently holding for M\d. New York exchange on London is firmer, and 
rates are advanced. 

The-Bank of California yesterday received $15,000 in Black Hills 
gold. The shipment is from the Desmet mine, and is the first at hand. 



fcjVTyr^* Published with this week's issue a Four- 



?age Postscript* 



THE STOCK MARKET. 
The long-continued depression in mining stocks, and the dis- 
couraging outlook for any immediate improvement, ia having a most dis- 
astrous effect upon the business of the Boards, and dealers are one by one 
reluctantly forced to withdraw from the speculative arena. There is em- 
phatically '" no money" in the business at present, and the few transac- 
tions that furnish the daily quotations are almost entirely for brokers' 
own account. The reform mining bills, lately brought before the Legis- 
lature, contribute in a great measure to the present unsatisfactory condi- 
tion of things, and the long-delayed passage of the Silver Bill is haviug 
an unmistakable effect upon her local market. In the one case, there is 
nothing to fear from the blatant humbugs who have originated these so- 
called "reform measures," for the good sense of the majority of the As- 
sembly will never countenance a bill so fraught with danger and destruc- 
tion to the most important interests of the State. On the other hand, the 
almost? speedy and certain passage of the Silver Bill will have the 
effect of an immediate resuscitation of values, and impart a much-needed 
confidence in the future of the business. With respect to the Reform 
Bill now before the Legislature, we trust that the brokers will do nothing 
whatever towards " buying off " the lobby, as trey have done in the past, 
for the same blackmail operations will only be inaugurated again a year 
hence. In this connection, we have to admire the stand taken by the 
Bonanza firm, who flatly refuse to contribute one cent towards a fund to 
l>e raised for this purpose. They are perfectly satisfied to submit to any 
investigation of the management of the properties under their control, and 
have nothing to fear from the passage of such an Act; and we advise the 
brokers and others interested in the welfare of the business, to take the 
same worthy and unflinching stand, and let the integrity and square- 
ness of their dealings be the justification of their deftase. 
The unusual increase of Eastern orders is attracting considerable atten- 
tion in the market, and the steady absorption of the bonanza stocks and 
other dividend-paying securities, attest the estimation in which our 
mining properties are regarded by Eastern capitalists. The bonanzas con- 
tinue to be the chief attraction in the market, and have advanced nearly 
the amount of the dividend just disbursed. With the present dividend of 
$2 per share, stockholders are receiving the enormous rate of 9i per cent, 
interest on the investment, and with the assurance of a long continuance 
of these dividends, we cannot wonder that our Eastern neighbors are con- 
centrating their attention to this class of securities. News from these 
mines continues to be of the most flattering character, and with the al- 
most certainty of a development in the Ophir, we can hardly estimate the 
richness and extent of the "great bonanza" deposit. On account of the 
excessive heat in the southeast drift on the 1000 level of Ophir, the work 
of prospecting the mine has been greatly retarded, and until a connection 
ia made with the California winze, there will be no cross-cutting done on 
this level. This connection will be consummated in about four weeks, 
when a vigorous prospecting will be starred, and the mine developed for 
all it is worth. The bonanza people have no reason to conceal a develop- 
ment, if there is one, and neither will they lend themselves to a "deal" 
of any kind, if there is nothing to warrant such a movement. Their evi- 
dent policy is development or no market. Though the week has in most 
every respect been dull and unsatisfactory, there was a manifest improve- 
ment at the close, and stocks generally were in better demand at im- 
proved prices. The "bonanzas" were especially in good request. The 
Alta-Justice muddle is not yet compromised so far as the outside public 
are aware of, and the "street" are already beginning to discount the prob- 
ability of such a settlement. Both stocks remain at about previous quo- 
tations. Eureka Con., Grand Prize and other outside stocks were moder- 
ately active and in fair demand. 



Sale of 100 shares Bank of California in the Board on Thursday 
at 91. For Spring Valley Water 91 was bid. The uffer of 73 for PaciBc 

Bank was perfectly safe, as the stock has been quoted at a premium for 
years. 

Spring Valley Company's Record of the Rainfall.— The rainfall 
of the season, up ba 8 a. m. on Thursday, as measured by the Spring Val- 
ley Company, is as follows : San Andreas, 44.5(1 inches; Pilarcitos, 42. L' 4 
inches ; San Francisco, 24.70 inches. 



We much regret that, owing to the great pressure on our columns 

this week, we are compelled to hold over a most interesting article from 
our old and valued correspondent P in a diamond. 



Printed and Published by the Proprietor, Frederick Marriott, 607 to 615 Merchant Street, San Francisco, California. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Feb. 16, 1878. 



It is the evening hour, 

And thankfully. 
Father, Thy weary child 

Has come to Thee. 
I lean my aching head 

Upon Thy breast, 
And there, and only there, 

I am at rest. 



GOD'S REST. 

Thou knowest all my life ; 

Each petty sin ; 
Nothing is hid from Thee, 

Without, within. 
All that I have or am 
Is wholly Thine ; 
So is my soul at peace, 
For Thou art mine. 
To-morrow's dawn may find 

Me here or there — 
It matters little, since Thy love 

Is everywhere. — New York Observer. 



MR STANLEY IN PARIS. 

Parts, January 17th. 

We have a certain geographical advantage over you : we get most 
good things first. Paris is, in fact, the great posting-house of world- 
travel, and London lies toward the fag-end of the journey. Envy us not 
the advantage ; it is about all we enjny just now. It is just the thing for 
us — we are passionate amateurs of novelty: and ju&t the thing for you — 
with your phlegmatic temperament, you can afford to wait. All this 
passed through my mind yesterday when I saw Stanley in a drawing- 
room on his first night in Paris. He may appear in London about as 
soon as this appears in print ; but by that time we shall be looking out 
for a new wonder, and he will belong to ancient history. To most of you. 
however, he will still be known only by description. Look out, then, for 
a little man — but that you know: Africa has, of course, taken nothing 
from his bight since you saw him years ago— for a man slightly bent 
under a burden of memories of fevers and cramps, though he must still 
be short of forty years, and for a simple boyish face crowned with a 
shock of iron-gray hair, in curious contrast of effect with the black mus- 
tache. For the rest, high cheek-bones, a tanned skin, the hands of a back- 
woodsman, as yours might be if you had cut your way through forest 
and jungle, and carried the elephant rifle firing a two-ounce ball, so long 
as he. Ife is growing wonderfully like Livingstone: continents and cli- 
mates apparently shape faces after their own fashion, and this pattern of 
the intellectual pugilist in repose is, I take it, the African cut. 

He is very quiet almost as silent as Ulysses the Second. I think he 
has not yet get over the wonder of finding himself back in the world once 
more. He is as a dead man come to life again, or, to be quite within the 
mark, as a prisoner restored to gossip and the daily papers after three 
years in a model cell. When he reached the West Coast, all the recent 
history of Europe, America— the white creation, in fact — was a blank to 
him. He had unsounded depths of knowledge as to the politics of Cen- 
tral Africa, and his mind was a storehouse of mcmoires de servir in regard 
to the secret history of King M'Tesa's Court. He knew no end of good 
things about the irfluence of strings of beads at 2d. the dozen on the lives 
and loves of dusky beauties, which, for freshness at least, were worth all 
the stories of Anne of Austria diamond clasps and Marie Antoinette neck- 
laces of pearl. But the record of civilization was as a closed book, and 
it is still little better, though he has been posting himself up ever since. 
It was news to him that Russia and Turkey were not exactly on good 
terms, that Hayes was President, that the Kenealy lion had at last got 
his mane dry. Even now he seems hardly to view these circumstances in 
their true magnitude ; his mind has yet to grow them, and there are mo- 
ments when he has a dreamy look, and is clearly back in the jungle once 
more, ready to let fly with both barrels at a whole drawing-room, and fight 
his way to the door — imagined as a distant port on the West Coast. There 
is every excuse for him: he was on the free list of the Telegraph, but the 
mail system of Central Africa still leaves much to be desired. There is no 
positive proof that M'Tesa has yet seen the appreciative leader which was 
evidently designed as the crown and recompense of a life of kingly toil. 
It is of no use to send the usual complaint to the head office ; even in 
Peterborough-court they come a little short of omnipotence, and their 
system of distribution is confessedly weak in parts of the neighborhood of 
the Equator. 

The mischief is that he cannot get his novelties served up in order. 
They are coming upon him in a heap : he is having a surfeit of the joys 
of civilization. On his very first night in Paris be bad to go through the 
form of jjresentation to a score of celebrities, and to hear Albani sing, 
and this in a private house, with the multiplied bewilderment of the pub- 
lic welcome to follow in a couple of days. They played to him, too, and 
the eccentric concord of notes was, to any one who knew bow to take it, 
a sort of discreet musical intimation that in private circles Wagner is now 
the rage. He bore it, but, if looks mean anything, his spirit yearned for 
a jig on the Bangweolo fiddle. There is the like danger of a confusion of 
impressions in his present home-life. It may not be in the utmost power 
of Malevolence to do much injury to a man of mark, but it can at least 
leave its name at his hotel. The cards are falling at the porter's lodge 
more thickly than African arrows in the swamp. I think he is beginning 
to feel sorry he came back. — London World. 

[As the return of Stanley is likely to raise the old controversy concern- 
ing his nationality, it is as well to state here that the result of that discus- 
sion shewed him to be a Welshman born, and, consequently, as he has 
never been "naturalized" in this country, a British subject. — Ed. N. L.) 

NOT ALONE IN OUR TROUBLES. 
This is not the only place, by a great many, in which there is dis- 
tress, and a large class of unemployed. The Pall Mall Budget says : "The 
accounts of the distress in South Wales are becoming very painful. It 
was reported the other day to the Merthyr School Board that numbers of 
the children were in a state of absolute n.idity, and utterly unable to at- 
tend school ; while many of those who did attend were in a starving con- 
dition. A correspondent of the Daily News at the eame town says that 
the stoppage of one after another of the great ironworks means simply 
and literally starvation. " It is not," he says, "a new sensation for the 
people, for there are thousands of families who have not had a full week's 
food since the miners went out in January, 1873. Any money they might 
have put by in times of prosperity began to melt then, and its existence is 
now a mere tradition ; and for fully three years men and women have 
been existing rather than living, picking up just enough to keep body 
and soul together." The actual cash earned by the colliers, after all de- 
ductions, according to another account, does not now average more than 



5s. or 6s. a week. A miner's agent, who has lived in the neighborhood of 
Cardiff for many years, states that he has no doubt that there are 
hundreds of instances where a collier will go to work with nothing but a 
slice of bread in his food-tin. The employment of these men is a debili- 
tating one, and now that this state of things has continued for months 
their physical condition is being weakened, and they are gradually be- 
coming less able to bear the fatigue of labor. Great distress is also re- 
ported to exist among the workpeople in South Staffordshire. It is esti- 
mated that in one part of the town of Wolverhampton 10,000 out of a 
population of 15,000 or 20,000 are in actual want. Whole streets are in- 
habited by unemployed ironworkers and miners. In the Sheffield district 
trade is reported to be very bad, and vagrancy is greatly on the increase." 

A German author has written a work called " Kisses and Kissing." 
He should have had an assistant. Two heads are better than one at such 
work. 

Banks. 



NEVADA BANK OF S &N FRANCISCO, 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAX. 

Paid Up Capital 510,000,000, Gold. 

Surplus (TJ. S. Bonds) 52,500,000, Gold. 

DIRECTORS: 

Louis JVTcLane President. I J. C. Flood Vice-President. 

John W. Mackay, W. S. O'Brien, James G. Pair. 

Cashier C. T. Christensen. 

Agent at Virginia, Nevada George A. King. 

Issues Commercial and Travelers' Credits, available in any part of the world. 

Makes Transfers of Money by Telegraph and Cable, and Draws Exchange at cus- 
tomary usances. This Bank has special facilities for dealing in Bullion. 

EXCHANGE on the Principal Cities throughout the United States, Europe, Japan, 
China and the East Indies, the Australian Colonies and New Zealand, and on Hon- 
olulu, Hawaii. 

New York Bankers Tin? Bank of New York, N. B. A. 

London Bankers Messrs. Smith, Payne & Smiths. 

[January 26.] 

THE BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FBANCISCO. 

Capital 85,000,000. 

!>.<>. MIULS President. | "WM. AI/VOR»...Vice-Pres't. 

THOMAS BROWN Cashier. 

Agents : 

New York, Ageney of the Bank of Calfoniia ; Boston, Tremont National Bank 
Chicago, Union National Bank ; St. Louis, Boatman's Saving Bank ; New Zealand, 
the Bank of New Zealand ; London, China, Japan, India and Australia, the Oriental 
Bank Corporation. 

The Bank has Agencies at Virginia City and Gold Hill, and Correspondents* in all 
the principal Mining Districts and Interior Towns of the Pacific Coast. 

Letters of Credit issued, available in all parts of the world. Draw direct on Lon- 
don, Dublin, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, Hamburg 1 , Frankfort-on-the-Main, Antwerp, 
Amsterdam, St. Petersburg!), Copenhagen, Stockholm, Christiana, Locarno, Mel- 
bourne, Sydney, Auckland, Hongkong, Shanghai, Yokohama. Nov. 4. 

BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter.— -Capital paid up. 81.300,- 
000, with power to increase to 810,000,000. Southeast corner California and San- 
some streets. Head Office— 5 East India Avenue, London. Branches — Portland, Or- 
egon; Victoriaand Cariboo, British Columbia. 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened subject to Check 
and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted available in all parts of 
ihe world. Approved Bills discounted and advances made on good collateral security. 
Draws direct at current rates upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents 
as follows : 

New York, Chicago and Canada— Bank of Montreal; Liverpool — North and South 
Wales Bank ; Scotland— British Linen Company ; Ireland— Bank of Ireland ; Mex- 
ico and South America. — London Bank of Mexico and South America ; China and 
Japan -Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China, and Oriental Bank ; Australia 
and New Zealand— Bank of Australasia, Commercial Banking Company of Sydney, 
and English, Scottish and Australian Chartered Bank. 

Dec. 9. W. II . TILLINCiHAST. Manager. 

THE FIRST NATIONAL G3LT) BANK OF SAN FRANCtSCO. CAL. 

Paid up Capital $2,000,000, Gold. President, R. C. Wool- 
worth ; Vice-President, D. Caliaghan ; Cashier, E. D. Morgan. 

Directors : — R. C. Woolworth, D. Caliaghan, C. G. Hooker, C. Adolph Low, Peter 
Donahue, D. D. Colton, Edward Martin, James Mofiitt, N. Van Bergen. 

Corresi'ONDKNTS— London : Earing Bros. & Co.; Chartered Mercantile Bank of In- 
dia, London and China. Dublin : Provincial Bank of Ireland. Hamburg : Hesse, 
Neuman&Co. Paris: Hottinguer&Co. New York: National Bank of Commerce. Bos- 
ton : Blackstone National Bank. Chicago : First National Bank. This Bank is pre- 
pared to transact a general Banking business. Deposits in Gold, Silver and Currency 
received subject to check or on special deposit. Exchange for sale on the principal 
cities of the United States, Great Britain, Ireland and the Continent. Commercial 
Credits issued available in Europe, China and Japan. Collections attended to and 
prompt returns made at the lowest market rates of Exchange. Jan. 1 9. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK (LIMITED). 

Capital, $5,000,000, of which $3,000,000 is fully paid np as 
present capital, iteserve Fund, §450,000. San Francisco office, 424 Califor- 
nia street ; London Office, 22 Old Broad street. Manager, ARTHUR SCRIVENER ; 
Assistant Manager, CAMILO MARTIN; Cashier, WILLIAM STEEL. London 
Bankers, Bank of England and London Joint Stock Bank ; New York, Drexel, 
Morgan & Co. ; Boston, Third National Bank. This Bank is prepared to transact 
all kinds of General Banking and Exchange Business in London and San Francisco, 
and between said cities and a ll parts of the world. Jan. It) 

THE ANGL0-CALIFOBNIAN BANK (LIMITED). 
4 i)i) California street, San Francisco.— London Office, 3 

ri: .-£ ■--£• Angel Court ; New York Agents, J. W. Seligman & Co.,21 Broadstreet. 
Authorized Capital Stock, 80,000,000. Will receive Deposits, open Accounts, make 
Collections, buy and Bell Exchange and Bullion, loan Money, and issue Letters of 
Credit available throughout the world. FRED. F. LOW, > „.„„._ 

IGN. STEINHART, ]" «"»agera. 
**. N. LILTENTHAL, Cashier. Oct 4. 



§400,000 TO LOAN 

On City and Conutry Real Estate. 8250,000 to loan on Gas, 
Water, Bank, Railroad and other securities. Mercantile Paper discounted and 
monev loaned upon all kinds of collateral security. 

August 13. JOHN T. LITTLE, 412 Montgomery street. 



16, 1878. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



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*. CRY. 

I ARKE.] 

Ln! I am weary of all Hide dm. Mid !•■• 

ifi-1 their ha' lonely tomb, 

irVsthrall, So done an I to <l.irk u 

[ anal] btar do fcrtunprtof l' 
Than let me lit 1 

Wh ];i«t are gone; 

< ■!%•• tin- t > li.:ir it BOt, 

K.u-tii, *« • in. n. Hut only to ilnmbar on, 

TWi i- the (Ate I i i 
For I look to Uh and ami see. 
If there be no reef in the RnWi 

Tbon will never U' rest for me. 



— Spectator. 



OUR SOCIAL MAGNATEa 
The following capital descriptions of two of our noted California 

.irv from Mr*. Knuik I.< slieV deVU book, " From Gothsin to the 

Golden Gate,* 1 just pablisued : 

Its kind out with walking, standing, looking, laughing and arfmir- 

retorned to the hotel, and found a raae of rosea awaiting ua with 

sn the house ; the rosea were the urgent 1 had 

a in I, inn. Pen too huge, indeed, for beauty, and only 

aa mammoths. 

In the evening we raturned the calif and found Mrs. S — a most 

; mi li-. idual person. 
Sli- rarely leaves her apartments, being extremely stout, yet with the 
amalleat feel and handa imaginable, but ana baa brought the world to her- 
self ; her wonderful conversational ability, sunshiny nature ami rare liter- 
ary attainments making her drawing-room the center of one of the brighfc- 
: Jly, iii San BVancisco, and reminding one of the tra- 
ditians -if Madame !' icamier and the galaxy of wits and savants that gath- 

arad around her. B living ornaments, Mrs. rt has been 

i make a collection of pictures, books, carvings, otyets d'art andftrt'e- 
ahrtr Ht to drive a rival collector mad. 

Among other items in the latter direction, one may mention three hun- 
dred tea-pots, each named after a friend, and the tiny ones after baby 
friends. A Japanese puppy, precisely like the little monsters one is fa- 
miliar with in Pottery, should, as he was alive, occupy a third place be- 
tween the coterie of friends and the coterie of tea-potn and bric-a-brac, 
although he was so excessively ugly as to be, perhaps, more charming 
than either. 

Mrs. S , besides being au fait with every book of the day, is an ad- 
mirable artist, and her young and pretty daughter is a musician of no 
lue.iti merit, and studies the art diligently in her private school and music 
ttached to the suite. 
M is. S has resided in California for twenty years or more, her child- 
hood having been passed in China, so that she is one of the best possible 
exponents of both the Chinese and San Francisco questions, which, in 
these latter days, have become so curiously mixed." 

" The next day we dined at ex-Governor Stanford's, who has the most 
magnificent house on this Continent; it covers an entire block, and its 
appointments are simply palatial. One drawing-room is furnished in 
rompeian style from designs which were the joint work of its tasteful 
mistress and her friend, Miss Hosmer, the sculptress, of whom America is 
bo proud. 

The dining-room is as superb as it is spacious, and nothing that taste 
could suggest or wealth provide is here wanting, while the sleeping and 
dressing-rooms are as luxurious as the y are dainty and magnificent, and 
the picture gallery is a worthy home for its choice paintings and statuary, 
where all of our native as well as foreign artists of distinction are worth- 
ily and characteristically represented. 

The dinner was superb, the thirty guests well selected and harmonized, 
the hostess a tall, stately woman, with regal manners fitly borne out by 
her costume of crimson velvet softened with rare old lace and embellished 
by a magnificent parure of diamonds and glowing opals. 

Her unmarried sister, who aided her in doing the honors, is a charming 
lady, both genial and courtly of manner; but the pet of the house is a 
spl ndid boy, some ten years of age, the only child of the parents, who 
waited nineteen years for his arrival. The little fellow was presented 
after dinner, and charmed us by his pretty and very graceful manners. 

He has great artistic as well as other talents, and all are carefully fos- 
tered under the charge of his adoring mother, who, on a subsequent occa- 
sion, took us to see his apartments. They consist of study, music and 
play rooms, bath-room, dressing-room and bed-room, all fit for a prince, 
or better, for the splendid American boy, whose manhood should be the 
perfection of our race, so nurtured and protected." 

*«n man eitner or t¥e"opera~s~so lar essayeu iiy tne oyster troupe. 
fj the title role, Miss Catherine Lewis found a part better suited to her 
Style and capabilities than any we have yet seen her in. Miss Hattie 
Moore and Miss Julia Melville both gave good accounts of themselves as 
" Pedro " and " Aurore " respectively. Of the male artists, Mr. Kinross 
leserved some commendation as "Mourzouk," though very little can be 
*aid of the other gentlemen. The setting of the piece was most carefully 
ione, and as a whole this always favorite opera— the very best of its class 
—is received with great favor by excellent audiences. 

Bush-Street Theater. --At this house semi-nudity, in the shape — and 
jhapes — uf the Female Minstrel Troupe, is still playing, or posturing, to 
jood houses. 

Miscellaneous Stocks. —The San Francisco Stock and Exchange 
Board have agreed in future to add to their list, and to be called regularly 
it the afternoon session, State, City and County Bonds. The Commercial 
herald has the following record for the week: Sales of 5,000 shares Du- 
ktnt-Street Bonds were made at 89£j 100 shares Spring Valley Water at 
>1; 100 shares Commercial Insurance Co. at 774, with some small sales of 
prafi and Water at quoted rates on all we have to report. Were the pres- 
■nt I legislature to co ntin ue in session four months l onger, business : " 

"Tell your mistress that I've torn the curtain," said a lodger to a 
female domestic. "Very well, sir ; mistress will put it down in the bill 
as extra rent." 



Savings and Loan. 



S4N FHANCIS^O SAVINGS UNION. 
532 California Street. Corner Webb, San Francisco. 

Dap— laaSIal Deewtwbar, 1*77 oH,ru*\73H 07. 

Oemrwiasa Capita! urn Beaarve Fined ■44S t SS3 «». 

«a: JAMES D8 KUKMKKY, President ; ALBERT atlLLRR, Via Pi I 
kdolphe Low, Charlea Baum, 1 hington Bartlett, < iarl 
D 1. lerl unpooll, sr 
LOVBLLWHrrn I tenter JOHN ABCHBALD Surveyor. 

HENRI 0. CAMPBELL \n 

Real Estate Beeurit] Oountj Remittances 
Mat by Wells, Ft 0I1 1 "i reliable parties, payable in Ban 

Francisco, but the responsibility ol tins Savings Bans commences only with the ac- 
tual receipt "t the monej . 

■ ■ 1 oaturs of the Depositor should accompany the first deposit No cbargi in 
made for pasa book or entrance foe. Office Sours; 9 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Saturday eve- 
nings, from '•'. to 8. Feb. d. 



THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

Deutsche Spar 11 ml r,clhhan I*. No 526 California street. San 
Francisco, Oppiobrs: President, L QOTTIG Boasdop Directors. Fred. 
Koeding, h Schmiedell, ChaSi ttohler, Dan. Heysr, Edw. Kruse, George H. Eggers 
v Van Bergen, 11. 1,. Blmon. Secretary, GEO. LETTE ; Attorney, JOHN K. 
J IRBO-E July 21. 

SECURITY SAVIN33 BANK —GUARANTEE CAPITAL, $300,000. 

Officers: President, John Parrot! : Vice-President, Jerome 
Lincoln ; Secretary, \V. S. Jones; Attorney, -Sidney V. Smith. Loans made OD 
Baal Estate and other Approved Securities. OtHco : No. 215 Sanaome street, San 
Francisco. Oct. 14, 

FRENCH SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 
Bush street, above Kearny, G . JIjiIip, Director, l.oims 
made on real estate and other collateral securities at current rates of 



411 

interest. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Masonic Saving's and Loan Bank, No. 6 Post street, Ma- 
SOUic Temple, San Francisco — At a meeting of the Board of Directors of this 
Bunk, held January 21st, 1878, a dividend was declared at the rate of eight (8) per 
cent, per annum on Term Deposits, and six and three-tenths (6 3-10) per cent, per 
annum on Ordinary Deposits, for the semiannual term ending January 28th, 1878, 
payable on and after January 28th, 187S, free of Federal Tax. 
January 21, 1878. [Jan. 26.] H. T. GRAVES, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE, 
rilhe IHberitia Savings anrl Loan Society, Northeast Corner 

JL of Montgomery and Post streets, San Francisco, January 25, 1878. —At a regu- 
lar meeting ol the Board of Directors of the society, held this day, a dividend at the 
rate of 7A per cent, per annum was declared on all deposits for the six mouths end- 
ing on the 21st hist., payable from and after this date, and free from Federal tax. 
Feb. 2. EDWARD MARTIN, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE 

The French Savings ana Loan Society has declared a Div- 
idend of Eight (8) per cent, per annum, free of Federal Tax, for the half year 
ending December 31st, 1877, payable on and after January 18th, 1878. By order 
Jan. 19. GUSTAVE MAHE," Director. 

1,000 SHARES 0? STOJK IN THE PHCENIXGOLD MINE FOR SALE. 

The Aline is located in Amador comity, Cal., on (he great 
mother lode, near the old and famous Amador and Keystone mines ; has an 80 
Stamp Mill, Splendid Water Power, Canal and Timber Privileges, a 40-foot Ledge- 
explored to 1,100 feet in depth ; has paid over 1 per cent, per mouth on par the past 
year, and with present developments should pay 2 per cent, hereafter for many 
years. The Mine has no debt. Capital Stock, 10,000 shares of §100 each, and the 
proprietor, Mr. ft., Hayward, now oners 1,000 shares at par, with the option (to orig- 
inal purchasers and not transferable) of returning their stock to him, on ninety days 
notice— at the expiration of six months— at cost, and 10 per cent, per annum interest, 
less dividends declared. Merchants' Exchange Bank Stock taken at §75 per share. 
Nov. 17.1 Apply R. G. SNEATH, Agent, 423 California street. 

PARTNER WANTED. 

A gentleman, with good connections abroad, is desirous of 
forming a partnership with another gentleman having- the command of cap- 
ital, and of good social standing, with the view of establishing a foreign and local 
business of importance. A thorough knowledge of the resources of the State, agri- 
cultural and mineral, is indispensable. 
Jan. 19. Address, P. O. Box 1630, San Francisco. 



MME B. ZEITSKA'S INSTITUTE, 922 POST STREET. 

French, German and English Day and Boarding School for 
Young Ladies. — The next term will commence January 3, 1878. Kindergarten 
connected with the Institute. For particulars, address 
Jan. 5. MME B. ZEITSKA, Principal. 

S10 TO $25 A DAY 

Sure made by Agents selling oar Chromos, Crayons, and 
Reward, Motto, Scripture Text, Transparent, Pieture and Chromo Cards. 100 
samples worth $4, sent postpaid for 75 cents. Illustrated catalogue free. J. H. 
BUFFORD"S SONS, Boston. Established 1S30. August 18. 

THOMAS DAY, 

Importer of every variety of Gas Fixtures, Crystal, Gilt, 
Steel and Bronze, and a full assortment of Marble and Bronze Clucks and line 
Bronzes; also a full line of Plumbers' Goods. 122 aud. 124 Sutter Street, San Fran- 
cisco. . Jan. 27. 

FRANK KENNEDY, 

Law Office, 604 Merchant Street. —Probate, Divorce, Bank- 
ruptcy, and other cases attended to. Rents, and all other demands, collected. 
Bad tenants ousted. Charge taken of real estate for residents, or absentees. Charges 
very reasonable. J^ n - 12 - 

SILVER KING NORTH MINING COMPANY, 

Pinal County, Arizona. 

Office: Room 36, No. 330 Pine St. (Academy Bnilding), S. F. 

[Aug ust IS. J 

COKE CHEAPEST FDEL. 

Reduction in Price: Wholesale Price. 50 cents per barrel : 
Retail Price. 60 cents per barrel, at the works ol the SAN FBANCISO I GAS- 
LIGHT COMPANY, Howard and Fir.-t streets, and foot of Second st. Jan. 12. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Feb. 16, 1878. 



IN MEMORIAM PIO NONO. 

The various Catholic Churches of the city have been holding a 
solemn requiem mass the past week fox* the late head of the church 
Arch bishop Alt many appointed Tuesday at half past nine, at the Cathe- 
dral, as the first service, and long before the- appointed hour the church was 
thronged and hundreds were outside. The owners of pews had to pass 
through the residence into the building, as the entrance was entirely 
blocked up. The Right Reverend Bishop Kip, unable to arrive at the 
pew destined for him, .was gracefully escorted by Mr. Oliver to his own 
pew at the front of the church. The crowd surged forward to the altar- 
rails, owing to the pressure from without, but were kept back by the 
gentle suasion of the priests, notably by that of Father Pendergast. A 
catafalque of black velvet, witli the papal armorial bearings on a solid 
black of Russian violets, crowned with white camelias, stood in front of 
the altar, with the pastoral crook and cross-keys on the top. In front of 
the catafalque was the words Pio Nona in white flowers. There were 
numberless crosses and wreaths, the offerings of the flock. The church 
was clad in black, and all the clergy of the diocese attended. The service 
opened with slow music, after which the solemn requiem mass was per- 
formed by his Grace the Archbishop, accompanied by Mozart's glorious 
composition and a large and excellent orchestra. The obituary discourse 
of the Archbishop was touching and striking. ''Death," said he, "comes 
to all ; those feet that had trodden so many lands in missionary work are 
still ; those beautiful hands, so often raised in prayer — those hands which, 
after blessing it, endowed this Church with the chalice you see before you, 
are now cold. Those benevolent eyes, that looked kindly on all, are now 
closed, and the heart that beat with charity for all, is in Heaven. Pray 
for us who to-day are without a shepherd. Pray for the Conclave, that 
wisdom may guide their counsels in the choice of a successor." 

The services in the Church of Notre Dame des Victoires, on Thursday, 
were not so well attended, on account of the violent storm of wind 
and rain, but the church was appropriately dressed in mourning. The 
walls were hung v'ith black and the edifice darkened. Over the altar the 
words "Pie IX." were formed in small jets of gas, which had a striking 
effect in contrast to the sombre surroundings. The original programme of 
the music was changed, on account of the indisposition of one of the prin- 
cipal lady singers; but the entire female chorus was excellent. Special 
mention should be made of Chopin's duet, "II Paradiso," which was 
most exquisitely rendered by Miss Zoe and Miss Jeannie Cobb. " Pieta 
Signori" was also done full justice to by Mdlle. Rottanzi. Miss Coursen 
likewise assisted with a violin solo; but, however good and skillful the 
execution, we cannot say that we like that instrument as church music. 
Signor Garibaldi, the celebrated fresco painter, was also of the choir, and 
his magnificent voice filled the church, as those who heard him last Sun- 
day can well understand. 

On the same day the community of Dominican Monks, to which order 
the late Pope belonged, held also their funeral service. It began at 9 with 
the Fathers chanting " Lauds," after which the requiem mass of Prater 
Xavier was sung by the following choir : Soprano, Misses lata Farrar, 
McDonald and Levy; Alti, Miss Adelaide Renter and Miss Thornton; 
Tenori, Messrs. Von der Mehden and Largan ; Bassi, Messrs. Gold- 
schmidt and Yarndley. The great feature of the mass was the singing of 
the Inflammatus by Miss Lita Farrar, who was admirably supported by 
the choir. This was so much admired that it was repeated in the evening 
to an immense crowd, in addition to which Miss Farrar sang, "I Know 
that My Redeemer Liveth." The choral department was ably managed 
by Mr. Nesaeld, and the entire service was solemn and effective. 

JAMES HAMILTON, THE ARTIST. 

The gems of art produced by this devotee of the easel and brush 
have become the admiration of all connoisseurs. The astonishing fidelity 
to nature with which he paints, especially marine scenes, fully justifies 
the term "devotee" which we have advisedly applied to him. It is 
known to his friends with what ardor he devotes himself to the study of 
nature. In all weathers, and at all hours from sunrise to sunset, he finds 
occasion to visit the sea shore, "to study the ever changing and varied ef- 
fects produced upon the great, restless, surging ocean. Every little inlet 
and bay around our coast is known to him. The grey light of early morn 
has an effect upon marine scenery which he has made himself thoroughly 
acquainted with. The russet ana golden hues of evening are equally his 
delight, and hence, by hard study and devotion to his art, he has become 
probably the foremost painter in America of marine scenery, whilst in 
regard to landscapes he occupies a high position. His sketches in water 
colors, no less than those in oil, are worthy of all credit. We are led to 
speak of this artist's work because of the impression left upon us by a 
visit to his studio, Room 120 Cosmopolitan Hotel. The very excellent work 
that he has recently done excited our admiration. Of the many pictures 
to be seen there we venture to select two or three that specially impressed 
us. " The Last Shot" is an ideal subject, showing in a strikingly vivid 
manner a ship burning from the effects of the last shot. The life-boat, 
rescuing the men from the fate that would otherwise await them, tells 
quite a story of itself. The sea is remarkably well drawn, and like all 
Hamilton's marine pictures are admirable in effect. " The First Gale " pos- 
sesses a realism that is peculiarly striking. The lights and shades of the 
foaming water are a study. " TheBurgoise" is a perfect gem in its way. 
The " Scene on the Nile'" is not what many would think in the style peeu 
liar to this artist. It is an effective picture for all that, and illustrates 
the power of Mr. Hamilton to do justice to a wide variety of subjects. 
"We recommend a visit to his studio, as being productive of intellectual 
profit and pleasure. 

The Ladies of St. John's Presbyterian Church, Rev. Dr. Scott, 
pastor, not being willing to be outdone in their efforts to alleviate the 
sufferings of the poor and distressed of our city, have formed a new asso- 
ciation, to be independent of the one long existing, for the special benefit 
of the poor belonging to their own immediate congregation. This new 
society have elected Mrs. Thomas Breeze President, Mrs. H. M. Newhall 
Vice-President, Mrs. Bessie Thornton Secretary and Treasurer. These 
ladies and their associates mean business, and will soon be in working 
order, having visiting committees, etc. Several hundred dollars have 
already been donated and subscribed to the Ladies' Fund, and Professor 
Knobfel, of Chicago, is now at work getting up an organ concert of a 
high order, for the benefit of the Ladies' Poor Fund. 



Paris eats a thousand horses every month, 
call galloping consumption. 



This is what we would 



OUR LOCAL GARIBALDI. 
General Giuseppe Garibaldi, on his lonely isle of Caprera, presents 
a scene that rightly charms an admiring world. Our local Garibaldi is 
every day presenting scenes that charm every heholder. His fresco 
painting is not equaled by any other artist on this continent. In the 
highest and best sense of the term, he is an artist of mighty prowess. His 
conceptions are singularly bold, his execution, even to the minutest detail, 
betrays a most conscientious fidelity to the requirements of his art, and 
the tout ensemble of all that he does never fails to leave a pleasurable im- 
pression upon the mind of the many who have critically examined the re- 
sults of his genius. The works of his, with which the general public is 
perhaps best acquainted, are to be found in the adornments of Baldwin's 
Academy of Music, the designs of which were clrawn by him, and are now 
exhibited at Milan, Italy. These may be rightly said to be triumphs of the 
decorative art. It cannot be too strongly borne in mind that the master- 
pieces that have come down to us from the greatest of painters were exe- 
cuted as decorations to buildings, mostly churches. Raphael, Reubens 
and other great masters did their very best work for purposes" of that 
kind. The Latin churches abound in specimens of the decorative art, ex- 
ecuted by the genius of early painters, and remain to this day a study and 
a charm to all who have suuls to appreciate the poetry of form or the 
graceful lines of beauty. Hence it is said that the Church has been Art's 
most beneficent patron. This is undoubtedly true of the past ; but times 
have changed, and nowadays wealthy private citizens are doing that, at 
their own cost, which in earlier ages could only be attempted at the ex- 
pense of the many. The private residences which ourjailroad magnates 
are having decorated by G-. G. Garibaldi exceed anything on this con- 
tinent, and perhaps equal anything elsewhere. He has already finished 
two of these, and is at present engaged upon the third. The designs, de- 
tails, and every minute line and delicate tint are all his own original de- 
signs. No two rooms of the- many he has done are alike. The Gothic 
style of architecture, in which the exterior of one of those mansions is 
executed, is well maintained in the inner decorations. The grand features 
of the Gothic, in all its forms and modifications, are all well maintained 
and illustrated in the various halls, dining rooms, apartments, etc. Every 
room is different, yet the Gothic prevails throughout. Specimens of decorative 
painting may be seen there in middle-age Gothic, old English Gothic, 
modern Gothic, Norman Gothic, and after the style of the time of Louis 
XV.; also imitations of the Japanese, etc. The really grand paintings 
which Mr. Garibaldi is executing, in more than one of the mansions on 
Nob Hill, will live as monuments of his skill long after the present and 
many succeeding generations have passed away. He is no mere tyro in 
his profession, but has practiced it for many years, and- in many great 
cities of the world. New York possesses many works of his. The Fifth 
Avenue Theater, Booth's, the Lyceum, the Grand Opera House and, last 
but not least, the Knickerbocker House, contain specimens of his skill, of 
which New York is justly proud. But, in the opinion of the artist him- 
self, the very best work he has ever done is that which he is now engaged 
in accomplishing in this city, He is a hard worker, painstaking and thor- 
ough in all that he does. If San Francisco may shortly boast of her 
decorative art adornments, the fact will be owing' to the presence amongst 
us of the famous painter, Garibaldi. 



THE WANT OF A FREE DISPENSARY SUPPLIED. 

It is peculiarly true just now that "the poor we have with us." 
It is a sad sight to see some fourteen hundred persons daily being fed by 
the bounty of churches and charitable institutions. Where there is so 
much hunger, it follows as a consequence that there must be also sick- 
ness. The efforts of the many noble ladies in our midst to overtake the 
wants of the starving hundreds, is worthy of all praise. When this tem- 
porary . period of distress shall have passed away, there will remain an 
ever green recollection of the acts of self-abnegation and devotion prac- 
ticed by the kind-hearted women of San Francisco who have ministered 
to the wants of the hungry and needy. Whilst, however, hunger was 
appeased, it was certain that a large amount of sickness required to be 
battled with. The course of events which has led up to such widespread 
distress, was sure to be productive of many of the ills to which flesh is 
heir, A diseased mind results in a diseased body. Blighted hopes, a 
gloomy outlook, the dread of want, resulting at last in actual hunger — all 
these things assuredly produce sickness. It, therefore, is certainly a fact 
that many poor women and children— aye, and men, too — who once were 
strong, are now in ill health, and unable to procure medical aid, or the 
remedies necessary to their ailments. This very obvious want, we are 
glad to announce, is now supplied. A free Homeopathic Dispensary, 
with advice to those who may need it, is given at an institution just 
opened on Bitgley Place, off Farrell, next door to the Hammam, Dr. D. 
A. HilIer[who must not be confounded with the medico of the same surname 
about whose diploma there is some question] attends daily, and will minister 
to the wants of all comers. This gentleman, having realized a competency in 
the practice of his profession, sets an example worthy of imitation when 

cities uf the United States, Great Britain, Ireland and the Continent, Conraierei2 
Credits issued available in Europe, Chn.a and Japan. Collections attended to and 
prompt returns made at the lowest market rates of Exchange. Jan. 19. 

LONDON AND SAN FKANCTSOO BANK (LIMITED). 

Capital, #5,000,000, of which ^13,000,000 is folly pairt np a& 
present capital, Reserve Fund, $450,000 San Francisco i irticu, 42-i Califor- 
nia street; London Office, 22 Old Broad street. Manager, ARTHUR SCRIVENER; 
Assistant Manager, CAMILO MARTIN; Cashier, WILLIAM STEEL. London 
Bankers, Bank of England and London Joint Stock Bank ; New York, Drexel, 
Morgan & Co. ; Boston, Third National Bank. This Bank is prepared to transact 
all kinds of General Banking and Exchange Business in London and San Francisco, 
and between said cities and all parts of the world. Jan. 1U 



THE ANGLO-CALIFORNIAN BANK (LIMITED). 
A C\C* California street, Sau Francisco.— London Office, 3 

■4t /X ^C Angel Court ; New York Agents, J. W. Seliginan & Co, , 21 Broad street. 
Authorized Capital Stock, ."JO, 000,000. Will receive Deposits, open Accounts, make 
Collections, buy and sell Exchange and Bullion, loan Money, and issue Letters of 
Credit available throughout the world. FRED. F. LOW, ) Mfmft( ,™ I 

IGN. STEINHART, J Managers. 
P. N. LILIENTHAL, Cashier. Oct 4. 



§400,000 TO LOAN 
Krug Champagne. — Private L ; uvee, in quarts and pints; Shield — 
Kruy— in quarts and pints ; Premiere Qualite, in quarts and pints. For 
sale by Hellman Bros. & Co., corner Front and Jackson. 



Feb. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



Theatrical, Etc. 



II 



■ 

■ 

portorm- 

•J1CV* aJ 

• Mr. Billing, for ilW 
Tom" in make-up and 
Mm, m u aa wuodan and mechanical .-** possible, and even dies in the 
I a marionette than 
Mr. Uriamer, m "tie«r,™ Harris," made a oomi»oiind of "U«*ij>' and 
- intended to be amply an int 
L i, particularly as regards tin- ulster (not even 

Known at that date . and the tight riding trowtere v/ai parttuularly 
air 1 hi-* meJudramatie manner mora to, Mr. Whitcar dn 

. | 

■ :' cloth thit would havo fairly maste-l it- wearer in New 

Mr. Battows roare i through " Phineas Fletcher" with an 

■ 'iint >'f noise somewhat remarkable. " Legree" wan 

idently under th-- impression thai the low, can- 

I the Spanish 

i permitted to "gaff" all the way 

i at his own sweet will, for some purpose tint did not 

usy" than Mi Warned 

heavy and "logy for the part, but she does not 
hi the faintest idea of the negro character. H^r dress 
point of burlesque, and she added bo tier general want 
«>f merit by the tatroduction of some vari iy hall songs uf the must ins p. 
propriate character. afiae Elsie Moore appeared, though only ra two 
Fortunately, as " Mrs. St. t'lair,'' in a handsome white bau dress, 
of the vigorously pulled-back species. Anything more onsuggeative than 
-mine at the death bed of little " Eva'' could hardly be imagined. 
The only fairlvdone characters in the whole play were Miss Walter's 
ami .Miss Meetayer'a very good rendering of "Aunt Ophelia." 
In not a single instance, however, was any attempt made to give the 
proper Southern pronunciation or intonation, either as regards the white 
or black characters. It i> strange it did not occur to Manager Kennedy 
I his "Sambo* and " Quimbn," at least, from among the ample 
material at hand. And this brings US to what may be considered 
the real attractions of the pie<e, outside of its elaborate and meat credit- 
sic effects. These are the little " Eva" of Zoe Tuttle," and the 
ttion Binging and dancing by the legitimate darkeys. 
If this clever child could he taught to discard her forced and stagy de- 
inn in her later scenes she would be the gem of the piece, and even 
with that drawback is very effective. The colored snpes are simply the 
genuine article in every sense, and their principal scene would he much 
improved by allowing them full swing, without the introduction of some 
third-rate minstrel song and dance men, with their directly undarlcey-like 
As we say, the piece is up for a run. 

California Theater.— Signor and Signorina Majeroni have tbia week 
presented two more plays from theirlarge repertoire: Faith and Friendship 
and The Living Statue, Both of these are strong dramas, the latter excep- 
tionally so. As ''Count Paul " in the last named piece, the Signor had 
Ins best opportunity, so far, to exhibit that excellently modulated inten- 
sity and perfection of detail, the peculiar attribute of this most admira- 
ble artist. As"Nnemi Keller" the Signora was equally successful in 
holding the absorbed attention and renewing the impression already made 
by her consummate talent. In both plays the support was exceptionally 
good throughout, and did credit to the company, while, on the other 
hand, nothing outside of the star roles called for any particular comment. 
Last evening the gifted couple took their farewell benefit in Jealous//, 
which we have already criticised as the Italian original of Led Astray. 
At to-day's matinee East Lynne will be presented, giving us an opportu- 
nity to compare these, Anglo-Italian artists in a play thoroughly familiar 
to American and especially Calif ornian audiences. This evening, by re- 
quest. Jealousy will be re], eated as a final performance. The Majeronis 
take with them the hearty appreciation and good-will jf the more culti-" 
vated and intellectually exacting of our theater-goers. On Monday The 
Deluge will take the Boards, and in which we are promised the most elab- 
orately magnificent spectacular play ever seen on this coast, and before 
which the two remarkable successes. The Black Crook and the Trip to the 
Moon, will be insignificant by comparison. 

Baldwin's. — Girojie-Girojla was produced with more finish and com- 

Jleteness than either of the operas so far essayed by the Lyster troupe, 
n the title role, Miss Catherine Lewis found a part better suited t:> her 
Htyle and capabilities than any we have yet seen her in. Miss Hattie 
Moore and Miss Julia Melville both gave good accounts of themselves as 
" Pedro " and " Aurore " respectively. Of the male artists, Mr. Kinross 
deserved some commendation as "Mourzouk," though very little can be 
said of the other gentlemen. The setting of the piece was most carefully 
done, and as a whole this always favorite opera— the very best of its class 
— is received with great favor by excellent audiences. 

Bush-Street Theater. --At this house semi-nudity, in the shape — and 
shapes— of the Female Minstrel Troupe, is still playing, or posturing, to 
good houses. 

Miscellaneous Stocks.— The San Francisco Stock and Exchange 
Board have agreed in future to add to their list, and to be called regularly 
at the afternoon session, State, City and County Bonds. The Commercial 
Herald has the following record for the week: Sales of 5,000 shares Du- 
pnnt-street Bonds were made at 89£; 100 shares Spring Valley Water at 
91; 100 shares Commercial Insurance Co. at 77J, with some small sales of 
Gas and Water at quoted rates on all we have to report. Were the pres- 
ent Legislature to continue in session four months longer, business in 
incorporated companies and local securities in general would he a tradi- 
tion of the past. < lapital has this advantage over political filibusters and 
demagogues, that it can retire from the field, and that is what is the mat- 
ter now. Projected hostile legislation is regulating all business out of 
existence. 



Herold'a fourth m The 






Mr. II 



ii' il liv 

■ ■ 

■ tii-- future time we would 
to Mr. 11-rold that' he should repeal merely tl 

in phony. It U one ol thn 

iwn. The other three movement 

the last, which is the purest m »1<1 of a 
The Saknmtala overt one wished and oxp 

It will be remembered thai at its first rendition, three weeks ago, Mr. 
Herald was seised with faintness, from over work, and was led '■■ 
seat. Although Mr, Widmer supplied his place, with excellent pr< 
of mind, the audience were too excited by the occurrence to enjoy the mu 
sic as they should liava. The repetition of the overture was, as we 
said, wry desirable and thoroughly enjoyed. The Cornet Solo of M. 
iters secured for him a well merited encore. His execution is of the 
[ghtning order, while his tone is ae soft as that of Arbaclde. The 
ib take place on Wednesday next, and will introduce to 'is 

art Overture by Riots, and Brahm's Hungarian Dances. The last 
named work is said to be the chei d'oruvre of the greatest living German 

ir, Wagner not ■ >ptea Sffr. Roderick Elerold will play Slen 

i - well known ISapriccin in B minor, presumably on the Deck- 
er " grand piano, now in the Hall. The programme advertises exclusively 
the Stein way" piano, bat up to date the rival instrument has apparently 

■ i the Geld -that is, the platform. We mention this, having 

hitherto been under the impression that the piano tight was a very bitter 
one. 



CALIFORNIA THEATER. 

BiiNlt Street, above Kearny. --John Mcl'nllou^Ii, Proprietor 
1 Manager ; barton Hill, Acting Manager. bast Night of SIGNOB and 

SIONOHA MAJERONI. Signor D. De Vivo, Agent for Signor Majerotii This (Sat- 
urday) Evening, February loth, by request, OLD CORPORAL, Saturday Matinee, 
EAST LYNNE Monday, Feb. 18th, will be presented, with aperfectiou of production 
eves aurpassj \a that ol the two last sin ves .>_-.-;, " Tin.- I Hack Crook " and "Trip to the 
Moon," Ki rally's Bpectacular pi. iy, entitled THE DELUGE; or, PARADISE LOST— 
with entirely New Scenerj bj Vnegtlm, Seabury and assistants, New Costumes from 
Pat is, the Popular KIRALFY CALLIT TROUPE, and a powerful Dramatic Cast. 
Full particulars will be duly announced: Feb. 16. 

BUSK STREET THEATER. 

Charles E. Locke, Lessee ; Frank Law I or. Acting Manager. 
The Greatest Bill yet Offered. Madame Rentz'a Beautiful and Attractive FE- 
MALE MINSTRELS, a Brilliant Galaxy of Grace and Beauty in a New First Port. 
The Splendid Specialty Company in a Grand Olio <>f Novelties. First time in this 
city of the Only Lady Caricaturist in the world, MISS GUSSIE ORAYTON, in her 
" ijiyrhtnin^ Cartoons" of Prominent Persons Re-appearance of MISS VIOLA CLIF- 
TON in a New Chauge Act. In conjunction with the peerless and bewitching MA- 
BELSANTLEY'S BURLESQUE TROUPE, in the grand Musical Burlesque, IXION. 
Seats secured at the Box Office during the day. Feb. 10. 

BALDWIN'S THEATER. 

Thomas Dfngiiire, Manager; Fred. Lyster, Director.--Sec- 
ond Wrek and Most Decided Success of MISS OATHERlNt! LEWIS. This 
(Saturday) Evening, Feb. 16th, and Saturday Matinee, will be presented the celebrated 
Comic Opera, GIRUFLE-GIROFLA, in three acts, by Lecocq. Miss Catherine Lewis 
as " Girofie-Girona," supported by a Full and Efficient Company, Grand Chorus of 
Thirty, and Full Opera Band, Sunday, Feb. 17th, Special and Last Performance of 
GlttnFLK-GlRGFLA. Feb. 10. 

SCHMIDT QUINTETTE MUSICAL RECITALS. 

Third Subscrip'ion Series. 

MERCANTILE LIBRARY HALL. 

Second Concert, Friday, March lst.--Mi«*s Alice Schmidt, 
Pianoforte; MR. LOUIS SCHMIDT, JR., and MK. CLIFFORD SCHMIDT, 
Violins; MR. LOUIS SCHMIDT, Viola ; and MR. ERNST SCHMIDT, Violoncello, 
Assisted by MRS. HENRY NORTON, Soprano. Box Office open for reservation of 
seat i on the morning of the Concert. N. B. — No seats can be reserved at the Hall. 

G&A.KD OPERA HOUSE, 

Mission Street, between Third and Fourth.— M. A. Ken- 
nedy, Acting Manager, Immense Success and Great Triumph ! Two Of the 
largest houses ever assembled within the walls of this thiatur witnessed the produc- 
tion yesterday of the new version of UNCLE TOM'S CABIN. It will be continued 
every evening and Saturday Matinee until further notice. Feb. 16. 

THOMAS BLOXSOM WrUGHT, Deceased. 
~Vfotlce."Thc children, or other descendants of Tnomas 

J3( Bloxsom Wrteht, formerly of Cranoe, in the County of Leicester, and after- 
wards of Southam, in the County of Warwick, in England, who died in or about the 
year 1S73 (the children or other descendants of whom are entitled to a share of £334, 
and who are believed to be in America), may hear of something to their advantage 
by forwarding to Messrs. Fox, Solicitors, Lutterworth, or to Mr. Woodall, Solicitor, 
No. 7 Southampton street, Bloomsbury, London, their names and addresses, with fuU 
information as to the family of the said Thomas Bloxsom Wright, deceased. 

J. & B. H C FOX, Solicitors, Lutterworth, Leicestershire, Eng. 
Dated this 17th day of January, 1878. Feb. 10. 



WE HAVE BEEN APPOINTED 

Sole Agents for the Pacific Coast of Moot A I'handon's Cel- 
ebrated CHAMPAGNES, and have in store : 

SILLERY Quarts and Pints, in Basket. 

CE.EMANT Quarts and Pints, in Case. 

A supply kept constantly on hand. [Feb. 9.] WM. T. COLEMAN & CO. 



Edward R. Hill.] HILL BROTHERS, [Robert It. Hill. 

Wholesale mid Retail Dealers in Artists* Materials, Pic- 
tures of all kinds, Gold and Fancy Frames, Mats, Passepartouts, etc , etc. 
20 Post street (opposite Mechanics' Institute), San Francisco, Cal. Feb 9. 



H 



DR. D- A. KILLER'S 
omeopathic Free Dispensary to the Poor, No. IS Barley 

Place, olf O'Farrell street, l 



ext Hanimam Uatbt 



Feb. 16. 



Studio, Room 126. 



JAMES HAMILTON, ARTIST, 
Cosmopolitan Hotel. 



[Feb. 1ft 



JOHN ROACH, 

Mathematical Instrument Maker, 4*29 Montgomery street. 
s. w. corner Sacramento, San Francisco, Instruments made to order, re- 
paired and careful l> adjusted. August 86. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Feb. 16, 1878. 



"The World," the Flesh, and the Devil. 

[By a Truthful Penman.] 

Dr. Pusey's ■work on Confession, which has undergone a thorough 
revision, and has suffered copious excisions, since the recent disclosures 
concerning "The Priest in Absolution" were trade, has at length been 
published. A passage or two will suffice to show the character of the 
book. Confessors being, it is admitted, prone to temptation, "circum- 
spection is especially necessary, where your penitent's youth or attrac- 
tions, great piety or malice, are liable to make any unwonted impression 
on your heart or their own. Do not be surprised at my including piety 
among the perils ; it has more than once been a stumbling-block to im- 
prudent confessors who, beginning with a spiritual esteem, have insensi- 
bly slipped into earthly and carnal attachments." Confessors are told 
to avoid fixing their eyes upon the female penitents confessing to them, 
as it exposes them to dangerous temptations ; nor are they to give them- 
selves so wholly to confessing women as to refuse to confess men who 
seek them. " It is a sad sight to see confessors giving their whole morn- 
ing to young women devotees, while they dismiss men or married women 
who have, perhaps, left their household affairs with difficulty, to find 
themselves rejected with ' I am busy; go to some one else.' " This one 
passage speaks volumes as to the real nature of the work of confession. 
How long are the lascivious priests to be permitted to degrade the minds 
and contaminate the morals of the female dupes, who are silly enough to 
resort to them ?— A friend writes to tell that the Court festivities at 
Dublin, recently, were of a most successful character ; although, owing 
to many shooting-parties in Irissh country-houses not having, as yet. 
broken-up, the drawing-room was rather thinly attended ; yet, for com- 
fort, the attendance was amply sufficient. These festivities taking place 
at night adds greatly to their effect. Parties in Dublin are cosmopolitan 
in their character, England, Scotland, the Continent, and, we may add, 
the United States, being well represented ; the young ladies are pretty, 
and the toilette of both dames and demoiselles fresh and tasteful. Our 
informant, however, who had not visited Cork-hill since the time when 
Lord Clarendon was Vice-King, mentions that, on the whole, the display 
of Irish beauty appeared to him rather to have gone off. It occurs to us 
that this is the old story over again: we were younger then ; our suscepti- 
bilities were stronger ; we were more disposed to adore than to criticise — 
in short, our correspondent is one of the crowd that praise the past.— — 
According to the statistics of the legacy office, Miss Hannah Rothschild, 
we are told, has, in her own right, £120,000 per annum ; but those who 
are versed in the enormous wealth of the Rothschilds can hardly believe 
that one of the elder members of the firm died only worth this trifle. The 
marriage of the young lady takes place in. March. It will be celebrated 
according to the Jewish and Christian rites. Miss Hannah Rothschild is 
not only an heiress, hors lifine, but, like many of the ladies uf her family, 
an enthusiast in music and art, and has very pronounced opinions upon 
politics, and all other matters. On the Eastern Question she is pro- 
Turkish.— —A Biitish merchant loved, not wisely but too well, a lady 
in the West-end. " Go," said the enamored merchant to the lady of his 
love, " and buy yourself gorgeous raiment." The lady went to a milliner, 
who resides not a thousand miles from Piccadilly. She mentioned the 
name of the British merchant, and this same merchant received a bill for 
£2,000. He protested, but in vain. The milliner threatened to sue, so he 
paid. Whether the milliner and the lady divided the money between 
them, or whether the raiment really cost £2,000, the British merchant 
does not know. ^— I am delighted to her that a wealthy but illiterate 
Californian has settled an aiinuity on my old friend, Sam Ward, the most 
genial and the most hospitable of Amphytrions of New York. — "Truth- 
ful Tommy. "—^W, is a wonder that no correspondent in the Times, re- 
specting medical fees, has advocated the system that prevails ir, Stock- 
holm. There, each doctor receives a fixed sum per annum, from the fam- 
ilies who are his clients, and this is paid whether, during the year, they 
are well or ill. I resided some time in that capital, paid my yearly fee, 
and never took less medicine, or enjoyed better health in my life. If 
every medical man were paid a fee whenever Lis patient does not require 
his services, and fined whenever these services were required, the general 
health of the community would be vastly improved.-^— A man of singu- 
lar force of mind died in Dublin recently. A few hours previous to his 
demise he called for pen, ink, and paper, wrote the following communica- 
tion, and sent it by hand to the office of the Free.natis Journal; " We 
regret to announce the death at an advanced age of our respected fellow- 
citizen, J. MacNamara Cantwell, M., Esq., solicitor. The deceased gen- 
tleman long occupied a prominent position in politics, and was justly es- 
teemed by all classes for his political as well as professional uprightness 
and probity." Of him it may truly be said, that he had not only a pro- 
found contempt for the grave, but an exalted consciousness of his own 
merits.— —Poker, poker, perpetual poker. Go where I will of an after- 
noon, I find that going on in the card-room. It is a seductive game, at 
which you may lose or win thirty or forty pounds in a few minutes. The 
rubber seems a thing of the past. One good thing poker has done: it 
has effaced "nap " — a game I always associate with a first-class carriage 
in a racing train, the cushions for a table, book-makers and bad language. 
— The World's Atlas. ■-^— I wonder whether there is any truth in the re- 
port which reaches me from Malta that, at a recent dinner, the Duke of 
Edinburgh ordered up champagne to drink to the Russian triumph in the 
taking of Plevna, and that alt the English officers present left the room. 
—The World's Atlas.—— Some one sent to the Atlantic Monthly the fol- 
lowing expose: "Lightly she lifts the large, pure, luminous shell, and 
poises it in her strong, shapely hand. ' Listen! ' she says—' it has a tale 
to tell, spoken in language you may understand.' Smiling, she holds it 
to my dreaming ear ; the old, delicious murmur of the sea steals like en- 
chantment through me, and I hear voices like echoes of eternity. Let 
her poise. She may also lift the convoluted univalve in a : strong, shapely 
hand,' and her biceps may swell out like a muskmelon. But the antique 
swindle touching the 'old, delicious murmur of the sea' is a humbug. 
Eor, reader, if you will hold a beaver hat, or a goblet, or a pickle-bottle 
to your ear, you will hear the same delicious murmur." 



Insurance. 



INSURANCE AGENCY OF 
HUTCHINSON & MANN 

BTO 314 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

AGENTS FOR THE 

Girard Ins. Co Philadelphia, Pa. New Orleans Ins. Ass'n New Orleans. 

Union Ins. Co Galveston, Texas St. Paul F. & M. Ins. Co.. .St. Paul, Minn. 

Home Ins. Co Columbus, Ohio | Atlas Ius. Co Hartford Conn. 

People's Ins. Co Newark, N. J. Revere Fire Ins. Co Boston. 

National L. I. Co.,U. S. A..Wash'n, D. C. JTrade Ins. Co Camdeu, N. J. 

Capital Represented, Twelve Millions. 

POLICIES ISSUED ON DESIRABLE PROPERTY aT FAIR RATES. LOSSES 
EQUITABLY ADJUSTED AND PROMPTLY PAID. 

HUTCHINSON A. MANN, General Agents, 

May 5. 314 California street, San Francisco. 



A woman in the suburbs has named one of her hens " M.-icDuff," so 
that it may lay on. We know a " painted face gal" who, for that reason, 
named her lover " MacDuff," but it didn't have the desired effect. 

Father— "Why don't yer say yer grace, Charley?" Charley— "Why 
'cos I don't like the look o' them taters." 



HOME MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY OF CALIFORNIA 

Principal Office, 406 California Street, San Francisco. 
Cash Assets, January 1, 1877, £595,291 ; Liabilities, $5,952 ; Surplus for Policy 
Holders, §589,339. J. F. Houghton, President; Ceo. H. Howard, Vice-President 
Charles R. Story, Secretary. R. H. MAGILL, H. H. BIGELOW, General Agents. 

Directors. — San Francisco — Geo. H. Howard, John H. Redington, J. F. Houghton 
R. B. Gray, Robert Watt, John Currey, L. L. Baker, W. F; Whittier, C. C. Burr, E. 
M. Root, \V. H. White, J. L. N. Shepard, W. II. Greenwood, George S. Mann, Cyrus 
Wilson, W. T. Garratt, C. Waterhouse, A. P. Hotaling, A. Block, A. K. P. Haruiou, 
G. S. Johnson, W. O. Wilson, A. W. Bowman, H. L. Dodge, Charles R. Story. Ala- 
meda County Branch — V. D. Moody, Chauocy Taylor, A. C. Henry, Robert S. Far- 
relly, Joseph B. Marlin, W. B. Hardy. T. B. Simpson. San Diego— A. H. Wilcox. 
Sacramento — Mark Hopkins, D. W. Earl, Julius Wetzlar, James Carolan. San Jose— 
T. Ellard Beans, B. D. Murphy, A. Piister, J. H. Dibble, J. S. Carter, Jackson Lewis, 
Jacob Rich, John Auzerais, John Balbach. Stockton — H. H. Hewlett, Chas. Bclding, 
J. D. Peters, A. W. Simpson, H. M. Fanning. Marysville — D. E. Knight. Grass 
Valley— Wm. Watt, T, W. Sigourney. Portland, Oregon— W. S. Ladd, O. H. Lewis, 
P. Wasserman, B. Goldsmith, D. Macleay. Virginia City, Nevada — John Giilig, Isaac 
L. Requa, March 17. 

FIRE AND MARINE INSURANCE.— UK10N 1*|S. CO. OF sTf! 

The California Lloyds. — £stablisned in 1861.-- -If OS. 416 and 
418 California street. Cash capital ^750,000 in Gold. Assets exceed £1,U00,1)00 
Coin. Fair Rates ! Prompt Settlement of Loses ! ! Solid Security ! ! DIRECTORS. 
—San Francisco— J. Mora Moss, N. G. Kittle, M. J. O'Connor, R, S. Floyd, Moses 
Heller, Adam Grant, Daniel Meyer, Antoine Borel, Charles Kohler, Joseph Seller, 
I. Lawrence Pool, A. Weill, Joseph Brandenstein, Charles Baum, James Moihtt, Ed- 
ward Cadwalader, Benjamin Brewster, L. Cunningham, W. M. Hoag, Nicholas Lu- 
lling, John Parrott, L. A. Booth, J. Baum, M. D. Sweeney, Bartlett Due, Gustave 
Touchard, J. H. Baird, J. G. Kittle, George C. Hickox, C. Duconimun, Wm. Seholle, 
John Conly, I. Steinhart, N. B. Stone, J. O. Eldridge, A. B. Phipps, Jos. M. Goewey. 
GUSTAVE TOUCHARD, President. N. G. KITTLE, Vice-President. 

Chari.es D. Haven", Secretary. Geo. T. Bohen, Surveyor. July 28. 

THE STATE INVESTMENT AND INSURANCE CO. 
FIKE AND NAR1K£. 

Clash Assets, 8450, OOO. —Principal Office, SISand 220 San- 
j some street, San Francisco. Officers :— A. J. Bryant, President; Richard 
Ivers, Vice-President ; Charles H. Ci'siiing, Secretary ; H. H. Watson, Marine 
Surveyor. Board of Directors : — Peter Donahue, James Irvine, C. D. O'SuIlivan, 
A. Bocqueraz, R. Harrison, A. H. Rutherford, R. Bailey, E. W. Corbert, George 0. 
McMullin, A. J. Bryant, Frank M. Pixlcy, E Burke, H. H. Watson, Dr. C. F. Buckley, 
P. J. White, E. M. Root, M. Mayblum, Richard Ivers, John Rosenfeld, Daniel 
Callaghan. P. II. Russell, Sacramento. John G. Downey, Los Angeles, Wm. 
Hood, Sonoma County. H. W. Seale, Mayfield. Geo. Rutherford, San Jose. Feb. 16. 

N3W EN3LAND MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO.. OF BOSTON, 

Has transacted the business of Life Insurance for nearly 
thirty-five years. Its assets amount to over Fourteen Million Dollars. The 
law of Massachusetts makes all its Policies nonforfeitable. It is a Purely Mutual Com- 
pany, dividing every cent of surplus among Policy-holders. This is the Only Com- 
pany on the Pacific Coast governed by the Massachusetts Lapse Law. This company 
has eoino"ed with the new Insurance Laws of California. 

WALLACE EVERSON, General Agent. 
Sept. 22.] 328 Montgomery street. 

THE SWISS MARINE INSURANCE COMPANIES C0MEINED. 

Baloise, of Basle, Capital 5.000,000 francs; Helvetia, of 
St. Gall, Capital 10,000,000 francs ; Schweiz, of Zurich, Capital 5,000,000 francs. 
These three Companies are liable jointly and severally for all losses that may be sus- 
tained. Lo^es made payable in all the principal seaports of the world. In the set- 
tlement of all claims under an English policy, our Companies will strictly adhere to 
the conditions and customs adopted at Lloyds, and submit to English jurisdiction. 
June 9. HENRY BALZER & CO., Agents, 213 Sansome St., S. P. 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INSURANCE CO. OF L1VFRP00L. 

Capital $5,000,000.™ Agents: Balfour, Guthrie & Co., Wo. 
230 California street, San Francisco. No. 18. 

LONDON ASSURANCE C0RP0R4TION, OF .LONDON. 

Established 1720.— Assets, 815.146,094. 

WESTERN ASSURANCE COMPANY, OF TORONTO. 
Established 1851 — Assets, $1,200,764. 

CROSS & CO., 316 California ^treet, San Francisco, 
George E. Butler, Manager. [Feb. 9.] General Agents. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Home Matnal Insurance Company. ---This Company will 
pay its regular monthly dividend of one per cent, upon its capital stock on 
the 11th Instant. J. F. HOUGHTON, President. 

San Francisco, February 6, 1S7S. Feb, 9. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Tbe State Investment anil Insurance Company. --Dividend 
No. 57.— The monthly dividend for January will be paid on February 10th, at 
their office, No.'s 218 and 220 Sansome street. CHAS. H. CUSHING, 

San Francisco, February 5, 1878. Secretary. 

8250 REWARD. 

Mayor's Office, San Francisco, January 30, 1878. --A reward 
of §250 is hereby offered for any information furnished to the Chief of Police 
which will lead to the arrest and conviction of the person or persons who caused to 
be delivered at the house of August Drucker, Esq. , ex-Supervisor of the First Ward, 
a package containing a mixture of gin and cyanide of potassium. 
Feb. 2. A. J. BRYANT, Mayor of the City and County of S. F. 



i the 
i the 



cter 8 
iotit- 



and 
lento 



16, 187a 



I AI.ll ■uuMA ADVERTISER. 



Roll 
ng't 

-•■) n 
Old 
lt'v : 
Win. 
agar 

■>orr, 
K*t», 



Bit* 
reel, 

..—.'har- 
kIIa, 
road 
cral 
nptc 
reel. 

En. 

idon, 
ii ry ; 
lank 

set.: 
king 
Man- 
tlon- 
rers. 



THE INTERIOR SAVINGS BANKS 
Reports ! he inte- 

rior, -r. million at lt» due* of the v »i 1877. Th«il 

U tUnd *» f>-l 



JVrt- 




Amv: 








.itk, Sacramento. . . . 


4,954 


s 3,:M4,9uo 


■it ■ 


1,942 




- .. r:t!ln-!il- 


1,623 




menu*. . . . 




1,8 K) 


1 ' ikl.-uul 




1,471.100 


1 - and 


2,233 


1,39! 


1 Savings Bank, San Jose.. 


1,162 


roo 


nk, San .T.'-k>. . 


1,836 


737.000 


Stockton 


1,667 


ta 7oo 


ille 


1,331 


1,138,200 


1. Savings .iml Loan Society, Kap& 




Jll.iKX) 








Santa V> Bank, Santa Rosa.... 






119,300 








230 




> Bank, Meroed. . . . 




- ami Loan, Santa Cruz 




319,500 



Totals . 



21,147 $ 14,023,800 



Nearly all of these banks have been Rtarted within ten years, and it is 
ft noteworthy fact that only one failure lias occurred in that period. The 
I Commercial Hank suspending in 1870. but reopening 
in January 1878, paying depositors in full with interest. The returns of 
the City Savings Hanks were published in the News Letter issue of Feb- 
ruary 2d. The aggregates of the different items of the statements are aet 
forth below: 

City. 

jits $60,631,300 

Capital 1,632,600 

K. serve 2,2-32 BOO 

Loans 57.041,91)0 

Bonds 2,900,900 

Real Estate 2,283,500 

Earnings 2,822,900 

Expenses 205 700 

< a.-li on hand 2.320,300 

Dividends 2,380,800 

Depi oitora 68,500 

Banks 12 



Interior, 

S14.023.800 
2,621,600 

047,800 

14,735,500 

473,400 

814,000 

848.100 

109,100 

1,470,400 

050,000 

21,100 

14 



State. 

874,055.800 

4,154.200 

2,890,300 

72,377,400 

3,374.300 

3,098,100 

3,071,000 

374,800 

3,802,700 

3,030,800 

89,600 

26 



< iompared with last year, the deposits for the State show a falling off of 
91,767,800, but of this §1,599,000 is due to the collapse of the three banks 
in this city. The total dividends paid by the banks in eleven years foot 
up (47,631,400. The average due to depositors is ©885 in the' city, and 
$604 in the interior. 



CALIFORNIA'S RAILROAD PROGRESS. 

From a carefully prepared table in the last number of the Railway 
Aye, it appears that California led the United States in the construction 
of railroads during the year 1877, having added 229 miles to her railway 
system, Ohio coming next with 227, Minnesota third with 211, Texas 
fourth with 204.$, and Iowa fifth with 169 miles. Of this mileage in Cal- 
ifornia, 190 miles were wide guage and 39 narrow guage. The total for 
the United States was l,365f mile3 of wide and 799 narrow guage road. 
This is almost equal to the new mileage reported for the year 1876. 

The progress of California in the department of transportation facili- 
ties is certainly remarkable, for railway construction on this coast is far 
more expensive than in any other section of the United States, owing to 
the mountainous character of the country and the high cost of transpor- 
tation of materials. Much of the road built in 1877 was over the desert 
country between the Sierras and the Arizona line, where even water had 
to be transported many miles, and work could only be carried 
on during the Winter and Spring. Our State is so destitute 
of navigable water-courses that its prosperity must depend upon 
railway extension. The interior valleys could never sustain any 
considerable population unaided by the locomotive. The capitalists who 
invest in these new lines, crossing deserts and tunneling mountains, must 
at best wait years before getting a fair return from their investment. 
That there should be a clashing of interests, that the farmer who does not 
appreciate the true situation of affairs should clamor for the same rates as 
his fellow producer gets across the level prairies of Illinois, where a large 
population supplies "a constant stream of traffic to the trunk lines both 
ways, is not a matter of surprise. That the people have a right to correct 
abuses where such exist, and prevent oppression of one section for the 
benefit of another, is beyond question ; but, when it is sought to cripple 
the railroads by restrictive legislation, retard the development of trans- 
portation facilities by imposing burdensome conditions upon common 
carriers, then it is the duty of the legislator to look beyond the present, 
and prefer ultimate and permanent good to immediate benefits sure to be 
followed by disaster in the end. It is gratifying, therefore, to observe 
the conservative course, relative to the transportation question foreshad- 
owed at Sacramento. There are no serious tendencies towards radical 
legislation in this regard, and we are led to believe that the measures 
likely to be adopted will conserve the interests of the people, and without 
impairing the just rights of capital. 

_ Tree-Felling by Steam. — A series of experiments were recently car- 
ried out near London with a steam-driven saw adapted to the felling of 
trees. The steam cylinder is mounted on a pivot attached to a founda- 
tion-plate, and is firmly bound to the tree by means of a chain and a strut. 
The saw is attached direct to the piston-rod, and in the experiments men- 
tioned cut through several trees having an average diameter of thirty 
inches in about foiir minutes each. Hitherto the machines devised for 
felling trees have been failures, owing to the expense of working them ; 
but it is believed that the present invention provides the means of rapidly 
clearing forest land at a very small cost. 



BOOK REVIEWS. 

11. M.H.JHT. 

This is th.- latent of th.- Cobweb Series "f Fiction, <>f which " Sidonie," 
by tin. nune author, i- probably irated " The Nabob " is 

written i ■■ Sidonie," althou 

woven round noon 
Irishman, who rejoi .rsenic globules to his p 

mote a false gaiety of spirit, plays a prominent part i v. The 

Nabob is a typically vulgar rtoutwui ricAe, a self made man, who ha 
an immense Fortune by the usual dubiou [ mis, is bh< 

teems with immoral insinuations, it will probably be widely read bj 

tain oil 

roxoht and Tax Stemr of thb Eva, By Professor i>. Wood- 
well Bant] o( Massachusetts San Francisco, Boggett, Bcoflold a Co., 1878 
The authorship of this pamphlet ought t... be sufficient grounds to con- 
fine the writer for life in a lunatic asylum. It contains neither ei 
grammar, punctuation, reason, nor indeed anything except rank idiocy. 
The following excerpt is a fair sample of the whule: "What man can 
comprehend one billion of miles, if lie has a good Bound brain, but if a man 
can Span in Ids mind, ami see with his eye, more than twenty billions of 
miles, I think his brain must be a little soft or weak." 

From .lames Miller, New York, we have " Stella," an illustrated story 
for children, told in verse by Mrs. Mary B. M. Toland. It gives an ac- 
count Of the efforts made to tame a little Indian girl, and will serve to 
amuse as well as instruct young children. The fact that it has already 
run through four editions speaks well for the popularity of the work. 

MEMORY DBMS FOR TUB YoUSO.— Being choice selections from a hundred different 
authors, by Charles Northend, A. M New York, Appleton & Co.; San Fran- 
cisco, A. Roman &, Co. 

As its author hopes, this little manual will indeed prove useful to pu- 
pils and helpful to teachers. One great beauty in the selections is their 
brevity, and as the name of each author is appended to the quotation 
from his writings, children using it are induced to read further, besides 
storing their minds with countless bright and useful thoughts. Among 
other things we notice the twenty-eight rules for his own guidance, which 
are said to have been written by George Washington at fourteen years of 
age. Appleton & Co. are constantly publishing most invaluable works 
for the young, and this is a very pleasant addition to the catalogue. 

The Portfolio.— An artistic periodical, edited by Philip Gilbert Hamerton; No, 97, 
January, 1S7S; paper; price, §1. New York, J. W. Bouton, 706 Broadway. 

The first engraving in the January number of the " Portfolio " is an 
accredited " Hans Holbein," from the Althorp Gallery — a portrait of a 
German lady. In detail it is a masterpiece of work, and although Hol- 
bein's art is not a desirable style to revive at this day, it cannot be denied 
that in its own order it is faultless. As Mr. Hamerton says: " The high- 
est consistency of art criticism is to enjoy opposite kinds of work, each 
in its own temper." The " Turner' 7 articles are continued in this num- 
ber, and are full of interest. An etching, by Whistler, of the fishermen's 
boats at Billingsgate, probably contains merit of a higher order than the 
average critic can appreciate. The celebrated " Le Bouvier," by Claude 
Lorraine, is also reproduced in this number, besides some excellent gen- 
eral articles. Any one of the engravings is worth infinitely more than 
the price of the number. 
A Sheaf of Verse.— By Henry S. Hewlett. King & Co., London. 

This writer touches many subjects, but always to gild them with the 
golden rays of real poetic genius. A tone of sadness, akin to joy, per- 
vades many of his most beautiful pieces. As a specimen of his graceful 
fancy and tender grace we quote the following: 

QUANTUM SLfFFICIT. 
Just enough light to find a path we hope one day to see ; 
Just enough love, with death in view, to make it bliss to he ; 
Just enough hope to trust Love's light doth shine our darkness o'er ; 
Just enough bliss, when life is past, to make us yearn for more. 



Baby Ballads and Other Pobms.- 
London. 



■By Thomas P. Nicoll, Aberdeen. King & Co., 



There is more golden promise than performance of a poet in these de- 
sultory and uneven verses. The author has a fluent pen and a fertile 
brain, and is often extremely happy in his original touches and tender 
fancies ; like, for example, the following specimen: 

HUMAN LIFE. 
Fair is the rose, and sweet as fair, Although for ages seen ; 

Yet is its heart of sweetness circled round Yet hath his beams sent death to many a 
With thorns that wound ; brain, 

Divinely beautiful the sun, aglorv ever rare And woe to many a heart, I ween. 



T 



A RARE CHANCE. 

LEASE FOR A NUMBER OF YEARS, 

he World-Renowned mill Magnificent Three-story Edi- 
fice, 

THE HONGKONG HOTEL, Hongkong. 

This spacious and commodious hotel is situated in the very heart of the business 
part of the town, near the PRAYA, and in full view of the landing places of all the 
mail and coasting steamers. The building has every 

MODERN IMPROVEMENT. 

and all the conveniences, an elegant bar, billiard rooms, reading rooms anda DINING 
HALL, which will accommodate 

TWO HUNDRED PERSONS, ETC., ETC. 

For photographic views, plans and further particulars, apply to 

DEGENER & CO., 



Jan. 19.1 

Tenders for Transmission to Honj; 
fice until February 15th, 1S7S. 



liOlI) 



319 California St. 
received at our of- 



RUHL BEOS., 
522 Montg-omery Street, 

Sole Agents for «... H. Muuim A Co., Reims, Champagnes; 
Plauat & Co., Cognac, Brandies ; W. *fc J. Graham b Co., Oporto, Port Wines ; 
JUL. Moreno Demora, Pto. Sta Mario, Sherries ; E. Anlieuser & Co.'s Bin 
tion, St. Louis, Lager Beer ; Jules Merman & Co., Bordeaux, Clarets and Sautenies ; 
P. A. Mumm, Frankfort O. M., Hock Wines. Dec 8. 



s 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Feb. 16, 1878. 



IS IT TO BE A EUROPEAN "WAR? 
After a lapse of half a century the Russians are again at Adrian- 
ople, and a new treaty between the Czar and tha Sultan has been presuma- 
bly signed in that city. The magnificent works of defense constructed, 
it is allowed, with rare skill and at an enormous cost, have been surren- 
dered without a struggle, there being no lunger a Turkish army in the 
field of sufficient strength to hold them. With this overwhelming mili- 
tary success, the war ought, according to precedent, general conviction 
and the rights of other nations, to end. But will it ? What are the rea- 
sons for supposing it will not ? Simply the aggressions of Russia, as 
manifested in the following directions : When the Russo-Turkish war ap- 
peared inevitable, the Powers, especially Great Britain and Austria, 
sought to minimize it, and with a view to that object sought and obtained 
from the Czar the most distinct pledges that his only object was to secure 
guarantees for the good government of Bulgaria and the other Christian 
provinces of Turkey ; that much accomplished, he pledged his sacred 
honor that he had no intention, or even desire, to interfere with the 
Treaty of Paris, and above all he pooh-poohed the idea of occupying Con- 
stantinople, and even went so far as to say that he would look upon such 
an occupation as a calamity for Russia. These pledges were again and 
again quoted to the people of England by Mr. Gladstone during his now 
celebrated peace harangues. Their good faith was insisted upon, and ac- 
cordingly the peace party in the Cabinet, represented by Derby and Car- 
narvon, strengthened by Gladstone's agitation in the counti-y, for the 
time prevailed. There were others, however, who doubted the entire sin- 
cerity and good faith of those pledges. It was remembered how, only a 
short year or two previously, the Czar, in entering Khiva, promised that 
he only intended to punish certain mountain clans, and then withdraw 
without annexing territory. How he failed to keep his word, the world 
knows. Taught by such a piece of recent experience, there were far- 
seeing men in England who thought it would be wise to place some sort 
of limit upon the reliance to be placed in the plighted faith of even his 
Majesty the Czar of all the Russias. At the head of the party which so 
thought was Mr. Disraeli. If he had had his way, he would undoubtedly 
have occupied certain points of advantage on Turkish territory, and held 
them as a means whereby Russia could have been estopped so soon as she 
had reached the goal of her pretended ambition. The result shows now 
how wise such a course of action would have been. With England peace- 
ably in possession of the fortifications around Constantinople, and at vari- 
ous points along the passage of the Dardanelles, no oue would have a mo- 
ment's doubt about the peace of the world being maintained. Russia 
would be permitted to enjoy the reasonable fruits of her vic- 
tories over the Turks, whilst England, Austria, and the other signa- 
tories to the treaty of Paris, would not have any fear that a 
settlement, which cost so much blood and treasure, would now be unset- 
tled. We now see how unfortunate it was that no such material guaran- 
tees for peace were seized upon. The English people see it, and as one 
result Disraeli is backed by an united public opinion, whilst Gladstone's 
house is stoned by those who used to delight in calling him " the people's 
William." Such guarantees not having been taken, the Czar, contrary to 
good faith, proceeds to dictate terms to his prostrate foe, which violates 
every promise he made at the outset of hostilities. The outworks of Con- 
stantinople are understood to be already in his hands. Territory is taken 
which menaces Austria. The practical ownership of the Dardanelles is 
bargained for with the Sultan — who is powerless to help himself — just as 
if the Czar had never made any pledges upon the subject, and as if the 
treaty of Paris had never been written. Russia is now at an immeasura- 
ble advantage over the powers specially interested. Her large armies are 
in possession of every fortified town and position worth holding. It may 
be, even yet, when she sees that she will not be allowed peaceably to con- 
summate her designs, that she will abandon them, or, at any rate, so far 
modify her terms as to render them acceptable to an European conference. 
We must confess that this seems almost beyond hope. Yet it is among 
the pcssibilities. If the hope should not be realized, what then ? In that 
case, nothing would seem left for England but to fight. The British Min- 
ister, responsible for expounding the policy of his country, said three weeks 
ago in the House of Commons : "Are the Russians, without resistance, 
to enter Constantinople ? I say, no ! Are they even to approach it ? I 
say again, no !" " The Eastern question," as Lord Derby said, "is Con- 
stantinople." That occupied by Russia, the obligation which England 
will undoubtedly consider incumbent upon her, will be to render such 
occupation nugatory, and that she can do, though all the world should say 
her "nay." Her great ironclads are amply sufficient to bar ingress or 
egress through the Dardanelles. With acco in pushing just that much, and 
no more, she could afford to stand athwart the entrance, play a waiting 
game, and weary Russia out, a thing not very difficult, in view of the de- 
plorable condition of the finances of that country. The Czar would be 
compelled to keep his vast armies where they now are. In short, the naval 
] •werof Great Britain alone could sooner or later force him into terms. But 
England has a remarkably efficient army at home, and a remarkably large 
one al road, made up of her Indian subjects, with whom a war with Russia 
would be popular. Then she is not going to be without allies, if she needs 
them. Above all, she has that most useful of allies, money. So far from 
Great Britain being weak, never in her history was she in a better posi- 
tion to show her strength. 

IS IT A HUGE JOB ? 
There are some pretty big things before the Legislative just now. 
The latest is a bill to continue Montgomery street in a direct line through 
to South San Francisco. Senator Boyston has constituted himself spon- 
sor for the new scheme. What particular necessity there is for it, the 
property-holders, who are most interested, fail to comprehend. Second 
street on the one side and Third on the other, would seem to be sufficient 
for all purposes. It is stated that the object of the bill is to extend Mont- 
gomery street proper in accordance with the surveys of twelve years ago, 
in a direct line to the Potrero. If so, then the taxpayers had better look 
out. The proposed extension would cut an angle off the Grand Hotel, 
cut clean through the Palace, and continue to cut through at an acute 
angle every street between Third street and Channel street. A number 
of real estate speculators succeeded, in spite of the protests of property 
owners, in getting a similar bill passed ten years ago, and commissioners 
were appointed to assess benefits and damages, but as in their report they 
assumed that the blocks to be crossed were perfectly rectangular, which 
was a mistake, the report was set aside, and we heard no more of the pro- 
posed street until Boyston's 1 ill was introduced. This looks like a huge 
job, which should be looked to by these most directly interested. 



OTJR 

Though we're late a day or so, 
Dearest Public, you, we know. 
For the sake of "Auld Lang Syne' 
Will not scorn our Valentine. 
Two and twenty years have gone 
Since this worthy sheet was born, 



VAiiEimNr. 

Gratitude is yours — as deep 
As the watchful we.isel's sleep; 
To the weak you are as kind 
As the tiger to the hind; 
To the strong you are as mild 
As the mother to her child. 



Troth! our friendship must be strongp, u t. why all your virtues tell- 
To have lasted out so loug. Sweetheart, don'tweknow them well? 
.Now and then we ve had a spat - 
Lovers must and will have that. 



Ah, there's the 



Duty sometimes makes us scold; 
Zeal may make us over-bold. 
But we always have been true 
To at least a. part of you. 
'Tis the custom of the day 
Pretty compliments to pay. 
What, dear Public, shall we say 
You are constant— as the wind; 
Wisdom (of the long-eared kind) 
Sits upon your brow of braes; 
Staunch your promise is — as glass; 



Know them all t 

rub- 
No, we can't say that, dear Pub. 
Every week and every day 
Some new trait of yours display; 
Some Protean "lightning chauge" 
That is charming as 'tis strange. 
No one knows what you'll do next, 
So, of course, we pause perplexed, 
When the season seems to say: 
" Swear you'll love her every day." 
Still, if our esteem j'ou prize — 
Buy, subscribe, and advertise. 



THE PROPRIETIES. 

Is it not about time that the moral atmosphere of San Francisco was 
somewhat purified? The rains havecleansed the sewersunderourfett, which 
recently wreaked with poisonous filth. Would to Heaven that some influ- 
ence, equally potent, would cleanse away the mind polluting, moral cor- 
rupting exhalations with which this city is too frequently afflicted ! Our 
Courts and our newspapers are almost daily made the means of emitting 
the poison. There seems to be among prominent persons, just now, quite 
an epidemic of publicly exhibited immorality. If debauchery must exist, 
let it hide its ugliness in private, away from the gaze of pure wives and 
daughters. It can be there shunned as the moral leprosy it is. But 
when it daily flouts itself in the face of the outraged innocency of the 
young, the pure, and the true, it is" time that the scorn of public opinion 
should be powerful enough to frown down its brazen effrontery. The 
most lax rule that has perhaps ever been formulated, only goes to the 
length of declaring that a " man's private life is his own business," but 
no rule has ever gone so far as to declare that when a man is either unable 
or unwilling to keep his bad life private, but parades it in public, that 
outraged society has not, then, interests involved which entitle it to exer- 
cise its most blistering' scorn toward the wrong-doer. It then has duties 
which ought to be exercised without fear, favor, or affection. The man 
who permits the exhibition in public of prurient descriptions of his gross 
debauchery, lust and seduction, contributes, as far as is in his power, to the 
pollution of the mind of every man's wife and daughter. That being so, he 
should be deemed an outcast and an outlaw from decent society, and the men- 
tion of his name shouldnomore be permitted within hearing distance of ears 
polite, than should the most vulgar expression of which our language is 
capable. President Hayes recently put his foot down against public im- 
morality in a way that is worthy of all honor. The New York Pension 
Agent was defendant in a suit for divorce on the ground of adultery, and 
he had no answer. The President promptly dismissed him. That was 
eminently proper. When a man enters the service of the public, it is but 
right that he should abstain from crimes against organized society, which, 
if generally practiced, would render that society impossible. This is a 
noisome subject to discuss, and for which we have little taste or inclina- 
tion. But when within one short week we see at least one disgusting case 
per day paraded before the public, and that by men who, by reason of 
their prominence and their wealth, set a peculiarly pernicious example, 
we are cjusraiued to ur^e society to a due sense of its power to frown 
down these hurtful exhibitions of publicly confessed immorality. 

THE COLORED PEOPLE. 

Much has been written and said in regard to the present and proba- 
ble future of the colored race. Articles of evil omen have appeared of 
late in various papers taking gloomy views of the subject. It is, however, 
a fact to be noticed for what it may prove to be worth, that where the ne- 
gro race decline there the reign of the carpet-baggers has been most ram- 
pant. In Louisiana, for instance, the colored people are so depressed and 
so dissatisfied with their home, that they were recently clamoring to be 
assisted to emigrate to Liberia, How Louisiana has been cursed by the 
carpet baggers everybody knows. Georgia, on the other hand, is a State 
in which the white people rule, and harmony prevails between them and 
the colored race, with what result the figures show. The Controller-Gen- 
eral of Georgia, in his official report just published, gives the number of 
colored voters in the State as 84,164. They own 457,635 acres of land, 
valued on the tax list at $1,244,000, and cityproperty valued at §1,199,725. 
Their household goods are worth 8-186,522, and altogether, with their cat- 
tle, and horses, and implements, and savings in bank, they are supposed 
to be worth over 85,000,000, which, for a purely laboring population, is 
not a bad showing. It speaks volumes, too, for the paternal State Gov- 
ernment under which they live. The truth is, the resident white people 
are interested, above all non-residents, in the welfare of the colored peo- 
ple, and if the two races are left alone, under the constitutional guaran- 
tees, to work out their own redemption, there is little fear but that it will 
be accomplished in the safest, most conservative and best way possible 
under the circumstances. 

Senator McCoppin, the other day, administered a rebuke to the man 
Taylor, of the Board of Education, that ought to serve him for the re- 
mainder of his days. It will be found in another column. The Senator, 
as everybody knows, has introduced a most excellent bill, to bring back 
our public schools to the true intent and purpose for which they were 
established. He has the support of the ablest men in the Legislature, and 
of the most thoughtful men out of it. School Director Taylor thought to 
gain a little temporary popularity with the ignorant many, by indulging in 
an unworthy impertinence, directed towards one who is his superior in the 
best sense of the term. He made a mistake, as he must now know. His 
castigation was almost severe enough to win him pity. He won't make a 
fo»I of himself again in a hurry. 



A Philadelphia brewer has veni, vidi, vici painted on the tailboard of 
his beer wagon. The driver says it means $3.50 a keg. 



16, 1878. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



8 



THE TOWN CRIER. 

»t if • dvvit »rt tboar 
M)n« lb»l "ill i»i lh< >ou" 



Tho dispatcher . U, of a female child with 

to lite 
at, anil h*ve taken 

■ . ,[ pub' 

',. s the 

nothing 

\\ lint we would most 

t M" course, it in un- 
filing must be done t<> put a stop 

• in of having duuble tonjnied female in- 

is obviously an end to the 

I this country/. Nevada real estate may 

parent! of this insidious blow at 

!■•■ made a terrible example 

»>f, ami the child u.- if • •■. ■; if and I tomb Asylum, or entirely 

■ of th.* way at once. There is .-i remote possibility that tin* mon- 

I'V bringing her up with a view 

n into future Women's Rights < lonrention 

trodilt'n man. The drawback to tins scheme 

is the abwolut* certainty <>f a woman doing just win: 1 of her 

.1 tho contingenl risks nm by humanity while 

tried, "-.in hardly 1 verestimatod. Such a 

. for Dluatration, might entrap into matrimony some over r 
r cornet player, <>r other proscribed and friendless person, whose 
facility for making prolonged and hideous noises would afford him a cer- 
tain amount of protection, After considering the Bubjeot 
with all the grave deliberation its importance demands, it is indisputable 
that the only solution to the problem ia the one invented by that much 
■hindered old philanthropist. Kin- Herod: '"Twore well 'twere done 
• p i kiy." and we should further suggest that the youthful phenomenon in 
»d of, l.e buried as deep as the Boil ami circumstances 
will admit, inasmuch as a female with two tongues is doubtless the per- 
•••i refern.il to by the good book, where it says that they " being dead, 
!;eth." 

One of our leading politicians, Mr. Cornelius O'Rafferty, or words 
to that effect, has been seized with a grave uneasiness, after the perusal of 
the public prints lately, in id Bymptomsof leprosy are 

set forth with a graphic completeness, which does credit both to the im- 
agination and the stomach of the reporter. Mr. U'll. fell to a contem- 
plation of his strongly marked visage in the family mirror over the wash- 
hand Stand, and was seised with a terrible apprehension. The ridges, and 
the furrows, and the scalds, were all there. It is astonishing how little a 
man thiiiK.s of one aide of his face, when the other half is gone, or about 
to go. Like roadsters, solitaires, and other trifles, the value lies in the 
matching; It was an inexpressible relief to the tenor-stricken O'liafferty 
to find the ridges and furrows to be nothing more serious than the Mile- 
sian system of featuring, and the scales an abnormal development of the 
freckle. There are people who would prefer the leprosy to the big brown 
raised freckle which appertains tu vermilion hair ami a corresponding 
complexion. But people who think thus, hare had neither. 

Now that the spirit of charity is abroad, would it not he well to 
provide for that large and deserving class in our midst who have been 
thrown out of employment by the sudden demise of the journals whose 
existence covered their poverty. It is reported of one unhappy man that 
he stopped the pangs of hunger by chewing up his own editorial on the 
** Starving Poor." The luscious suggestions of shin bone, carrot ragout, 
etc., made his mouth water, until he appeased his appetite by swallowing 
the water. They may be observed around the free lunch churches, pencil 
and paper in hand, grabbing with apparent abstraction at the boms and 
crumbs which the unemployed sybarite lets fall, and writing phantom re- 
ports for phantom papers. It would be a sight to make angels weep, if 
there were any sense in reducing angels to such an extremity, to see the 
unemployed reporters getting a good feed. 

An unemployed, driven to desperation by the thought of the near ex- 
piration of the free lunch season, has hit upon an expedient for next year's 
provisions. Owing to the interest evinced by a large class of non tax- 
payers in the education of the masses, he became, in his youth, an 
educated mass, and swung the cheerful pick, or delved with the useful 
shovel, or carried the picturesque hod, according to all approved rules 
of simple equation or compound leverage, or any other of the jargon 
which crossed Ids enlightened mind. He now smites his forehead daily 
with expulsive force, and is gradually eliminating its store. But little 
more remains for him to do. The multiplication table and the alphabet 
are all that now oppress him. When he shall be able to forget them, he 
will run for School Director, and draw the S1GJ salary. 

The principal line of defense employed by the counsel of Thomas 
Nice, and which is expected to completely subjugate the jury, is the fact 
that he is a son of his mother, Adelaide Murdoch. This remarkable freak 
of nature is an affliction which befell him early in life, and which he 
could by no means have anticipated. It does not seem a sufficient reason, 
however, why unhappy men should be summoned from the bosoms of 
their families, and be obliged to sit up day after day before that Medusan 
beauty in the capacity of jurors. This may account in a measure for the 
playful caprice in which jurors latterly indulge of breaking a leg or get- 
ting inflammation of the Eesophagus at an interesting point. Atrial is 
like a wedding. The object of interest can be endured, but when they 
ring in the whole family it makes a bad showing. 

Mr. Joaquin Miller intimates a desire to be cremated after death. If 
the gentleman hadjehosen to leave sealed instructions to that effect, no 
doubt a large and interested circle would have taken pleasure in comply- 
ing with them. As it is, he has put an idea in people's heads, something 
of which he was never guilty before; and it is now difficult to restrain an 
excited and indignant populace from cremating him before death. If he 
and the Cincinnati lady, who is affiioted with a wish similar to his own, 
could manage to go up into Abraham's bosom together, we might manage 
that bonfire in the First Ward to celebrate St. Patrick's Day. It is im- 
possible to think of burning barrels with so much raiu- water to catch. 



Now that it is decided . !1. even the Ministers a* 

i uly g I will be thrilled i 

Id b] I and with 

; the Rsv. Mr. tl'iopliill "a dilettante," That 
i--. the 

A the tenible charge. The latter insinuates, however, ths 
II. had Utter not call him " another.* 1 and winds up his card with the 
somewhat m [on that "what is Mr. Hemphil 

d.vil," which is supposed to be ■ covert Ming at that divim 
bmil. d bones, VYe advise Mr, [Jams, from this out, to " go heeled." 

A pleasant variation on the domestic Implement o! wurfai 
been.dlsoovsred, Good wives have abided bythebr d poker, 
not for their peculiar adaptability to the use In question, but foi 
and inborn respect for th" laws of tradition. The lady who hasn 
new departure, found lively recreation the other day in belal 

husband ol her bosom with ■ full-sized, heavily bound Webster'.-. In 

abridged Dictionary. As she ceased from her work, panting andfatl 
but happy, she reported it to be the easiest, most efflosmous, and moat 

M'ul-s.ii i-ryiii - manner of laying a lean under a spill. 

We may shortly look for the appearance of the faithful, the female 
faithful, in their .spring suits. It is but natural to premise that tiny will 

be elaborately trimmed with black velvet. The Pope wastoogreataman 
bo mourn with the black cambric which answered for Lincoln and Seward 

anil other small fry, and the result has been a velvet panic in the classic 

[nets of Third and Fourth streets. We want to put In a word for our 

girls. The Catholic poor have had a pretty good haul at the Protestant 
lunches. Let the Protestant girls get a little chance at the Catholic vel- 
vet auction. 

The managing editor of Lennie McCormick hasn't had a card in 
the Chronicle for over three days, and the circulation of that chaste family 
journal is Buffering in consequence. One of its two San .lose subscribers 
has Bent in a "stop," while the other has decided to hold on till Sunday, 
in hopes that something equally enjoyable may turn up. While we do 
not wish to interfere with our contemporary's prerogatives, we, neverthe- 
less, desire to state that ladies about to sue local capitalists will hear of 
something to our advantage by calling first at this office. 

A single female house-fly will produce, in one season, nearly eleven 
million eggs, says an English paper. This shows the gross immorality of 
English Hies ; however, at the risk of reflecting upon our climate and lo- 
cality, we will bet on our San Francisco flies every time. In all serious- 
ness, however, should not this sort of thing be stopped by the police? 
Whither are we drifting? 

That Past Grand Master of the Ancient Order of Marrionnettes, 
Mr. Pickering, is disgruntled because Heaven seems to, at present, be in- 
terested in watering Spring Valley stock. The slow, unnioving ringer of 
Bulletin scorn will hereafter be pointed at the Signal Service Weather 
Bureau, the officer in charge of which will now be denounced for corrup- 
tion twice a day, fc. f. 

The bill recently introduced to commute the terms of the prisoners 
at San Qnentin in accordance with their merit, is 'rigorously opposed by 
our Brokers and Savings Bank officers, on the ground that it would result 
in at once turning about a hundred and fifty accomplished thieves loose 
upon the community. There is too much competition in the above occu- 
pations already. 

And again the question arises whether the Constitution of these 
United States is, or is not, a hollow mockery and a delusive fraud? That 
dignified old document distinctly states that "the right to bear arms shall 
not be interfered with." But the fact is very'little consolation to the 
hoodlum who has just paid a twenty-dollar fine for carrying a two-dollar- 
and-a-half pistol. 

A man named Siegler jumped from the train at Ogden a few days 
ago, while going East from this city, and while suffering from an attack 
of temporary insanity. He was. badly hurt; but, on the other hand, his 
wife did not hear of the matter until next morning, and then none could 
remember exactly where the accident occurred. Adversity has its uses. 

Never put a bottle of Hair Restorer on the same shelf with the 
baby's paregoric. A Natoma street man did so the other day, and that 
night the baby was nearly killed by a natural mistake of its mother. We 
suppose the paregoric must have impregnated the Hair Restorer in some 
way. At all events, the man has less hair now than ever. 

? The Irish population of St. Louis are disgusted that German is taught 
in the public schools to the exclusion of other languages, and have peti- 
tioned the School Board of that city to have French, Italian and Celtic 
included. Is it possible that this is an insidious move to foist another 
superfluous batch of politicians upon the country? 

As an evidence of the cold-blooded ferocity and imperturbability of 
the Russian soldiers, we need only state that it is their invariable custom, 
after each battle, to search among the slain for the most thoroughly rid- 
dled Turk procurable to use as a cribbage board. 

A New York paper says that " the giraffe at the Central Park has a 
bad cold, and the editor sits back and watches to see how many country 
contemporaries will snap at the bait, and instantly work off that antedi- 
luvian joke about three yards of sore-throat. 

Horace Greeley, we are now confidentially informed by the New York 
Tribune, was fond of brown bread stuffed with oysters. He also had a 
pretty good opinion of Horace Greeley stuffed with brown bread and 
oysters. 

A man in Boston, who was recently released from a Lunatic Asylum, 
has just gotten safely off to South America with two hundred thousand 
dollars of somebody else's money. It is a withering comment on the 
medical fraternity of Boston that such a man could have been confined as 
insane for a single moment. 

One of our female fortune-tellers advertises, as an important astro- 
logical fact, that she had "a child born to her on the first day of the 
present year." It is fair to assume that the embryo sooth-sayer receives 
inspiration direct from the Milky Way, and is furnished with a New 
Year's caul. 

Our detective force have nothing to say about Duncan as yet. They 
evidently believe in the motto of " Speak of a man as you Jind him." 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Feb. 16, 1878. 



'TIS EVER THUS. 

Ages ago a king did rule, , 

Whose head was white and whose form was 
bent. 
He married a princess just from school, 
And, the wedding-feast eaten, he began to 
repent. 

A page there was, with hair of gold, 

Who bore the train of this queen so fair ; 

To his songs so sweet, to his words so bold, 
Her Majesty bent a listening ear. 

But coquettish queens make jealous kings, 
And our monarch's love-days had long gone 
by; 
So the pretty, giddy, foolish things, 
On a scaffold tall together must die. 

— Heine. 

TEMPLE BAR. 

No one sees Temple Bar without connecting it 
with the human remains — dried by summer heats, 
and beaten and occasionally hurled to the ground 
by winter storms — by which it was so long sur- 
mounted. The 6rst ghastly ornament of the Bar 
was one of the quarters of Sir William Arm- 
strong, Master of the Horse to Charles II., who 
was concerned in the Rye House Plot, and who, 
after his execution (1684), was boiled in pitch and 
divided into four parts. The head and quarters 
of Sir William Perkins and the quarters of Sir 
John Friend, who had conspired to assassinate 
William III., '" from love to King James and the 
Prince of Wales," were next exhibited, " a dis- 
mal sight," says Evelyn, "which many pitied." 
The next head raised her* was that of Joseph 
Sullivan, executed for high treason in 1715, Hen- 
ry Osprey followed, who died for love of Prince 
Charlie in 1716 ; and Christopher Layer, execu- 
ted for a plot to seize the king's person in 1723. 
The last heads which were exposed on the Bar 
were those which were concerned in the " Rebel 
lion of *4o." It is difficult to believe that it is 
scarcely more than a hundred and twenty years 
since Colonel Francis Townley, George Fletcher, 
and seven other Jacobites were so barbarously 
dealt with — hanged on Kennineton Common, cut 
down, disemboweled, beheaded, quartered, their 
hearts tossed into a fire, from which one of them 
was snatched by a bystander, who devoured it to 
show his loyalty. Walpnle afterwards saw their 
heads on Temple Bar, and says that people used to 
make a trade of letting out spy-glasses to look at 
them at a half-penny a look. The spikes which 
supported the heads were only removed in the 
present century. It was in front of the Bar that 
the miserable Titus Oates stood in the pillory, 

Eelted with dead cats and rotten eggs, and that 
>e Foe, placed in the pillory for a libel on the 
Government, stood there enjoying a perfect ova- 
tion from the people, who drank his health as they 
hung the pillory with flowers. — Walks In London, 
by Aug. J. C. Bare, just published. 

ALLIGATOR LEATHER. 

Exactly how many alligators' hides are re- 
ceived annually in New York to be tanned for 
boots and shoes is not known, but they do not 
fall far below ten thousand skins. They are dis- 
posed of in two ways: One or two firms in Mas- 
sachusetts buy them to make up into cheap ma- 
chine-sewed shoes ; while shoe-makers in New 
York purchase almost exclusively for custom 
work. The largest consumers are Mahrenholz 
Bros., in Broadway, who use up over five thou- 
sand skins in a year. The Red River, the bayous 
along the lower Mississippi, and the swamps of 
Florida furnish almost all the alligator hides 
used. As soon as the reptile is shot and dragged 
to shore the under portion is cut and stripped off, 
as that is the only part of the hide that can be 
tanned. Especial pains are taken to preserve the 
skin on the under side of each claw. It has the 
finest marking, and is soft and elegant. The 
hide is preserved in brine, as other animals. 

A blazing torch or pitch pine knot attracts the 
reptile, and, as he swims up to investigate, his 
little bead-like eyes glow like coals, and make an 
excellent target for the rifle. That is the only 
weapon used. A bullet through the creature's 
skin renders it worthless. It is difficult to pierce 
the hide, however, as the back and sides are 
horny and bullet-proof. This horny substance 
is, when it can be easily transported, made into 
glue. The age of the alligator has nothing to do 
with the excellence of the hide. Shoes are made 
from the skin of the claws, generally the rear 
ones, as the others are too small. A good hide, 
ready for the last, is worth say, £12 ; a poor Gne 
£8. — British Trade Journal. 



Temple Bar has now become a thing of the 
past. The strand and Fleet-street have gained 
in dignity of appearance, and the view of the 
new Law Courts has become quite imposing. 



LIGHT AND SHADE. 

It is the law of streams to run. 

Of autumn leaves to fall, 
And she who has been'false to one — 

She will be false to all. 

O, wild as tempest on the sea 

Is that poor lover's fate, 
Whose faithful spirit bound to thee, 

Must hope, and fear, and wait! 

By surge of joy and storm of pain 
His heart is soothed or broke ; 

He would not rend thy heavenly chain — 
He cannot bear thy yoke. 

There is no heaven so high as faith, 

No hell so deep as doubt, 
No haunted spectre like the wraith 

Thy fancies wile or flout! 

Ah, let that tiger heart of thine, 

By brutish mercy led, 
To just one piteous act incline — 

And strike thy lover dead! 

Then let the streams forever run, 

And leaves forever fall ! 
Thou wilt, at last, be true to one, 

And not be false to all. 

— Baldwin's Monthly. 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD. 

NORTHERN DIVISION. 

WINTER ARRANGEMENT. 

(^omnieitciiig- Monday, Oct. 33d, 1877, 
J Passenger Trains will leave San Francisco from Pas- 
senger Depot on Townsend street, between Third and 
Fourth streets, as follows : 

8 A a.m (daily) for San Jose, Gilroy, Hollister, Tres 
.0\7 Pinos, Pajaro, Salinas. Soledad and all Way 
Stations, making: Stage connections at San Mateo for 
Half Moon Bay and Pescadero ; at Redwood for Wood- 
side, Searsville and Pescadero ; at San Jose for Los 
Gatos and Lexington ; at Gilroy for Los Banos and Fire- 
baugh's ; at Sargent's for San Juan and Natividad ; at 
Soledad for Paraiso Springs, Paso Robles Hot Springs, 
San Luis Obispo, Guadalupe, Santa Barbara, San Buen- 
aventura and Los Angeles. 

g^ 3 At Pajaho connects with the Santa Cruz Rail- 
road forAPTOS and Saxta Cnuz. 



HO ?L a m. (daily) for Menlo Park and Way Sta- 
.U«J tious. 



3Q£T p.m. daily (Sundays excepted) for San Jose, 
.-JtJ Gilrov and Wav Stations. 



Gilroy and Way Stations 



4- 4-0 P,M " 0**"^) for ^ an Jose aQ d Way Stations. 
ii OA p.m. (daily) for Menlo Park and Way Stations. 



B3P™ Extra train on Sundays discontinued. 

A. C. BASSETT, Superintendent. 
H. R. JUDAH, Assistant Passenger and Ticket Agent. 



SOUTHERN IH VISIONS. 

83^"* Passengers for points on the Southern Divisions 
of the road will take the cars of the Central Pacific Rail- 
road via OAKLAND, leaving SAN FRANCISCO via Ferry 
Landing, Market street, at i:00 p.m. daily, and making 
close connection at GOSHEN for Sumner, Mojave, Los 
Angeles, Wilmington, Anaheim, Colton & Colorado River. 



C. P. R. R. 



Commencing "Wednesday, Jan. 9, 1878, and until 
further notice, Trains and Boatswill Leave S- F: 

Overland Ticket Office, at Ferry Landing, Market street. 



7f\f\ A. M. (daily). Vallejo Steamer (from Market 
'"" Street Landing — Connecting with Trains for 
Napa (Stages for Sonoma), Calistoga (the Geysers), 
Woodland, Williams, Knight's Landing and Sacramento. 
(Sundays excepted) for Woodland, Williams and 
Knight's Landing. (Arrive San Francisco 8:10 p.m.) 



Q 0(1 A,Mi ( dail J") ) Atlantic Express Train (via Oak- 
^•V\J land Ferry) for Sacramento, Marysville, Red- 
ding, Portland (Or.), Colfax, Reno (Virginia City), Pali- 
sade (Eureka), Ogden and Omaha. Connects at Gait 
with train arriving at lone at 3:40 p.m. 

(Arrive San Francisco 5:35 P.M.) 



Q 9H A.M. (Sundays excepted) Northern Railway Lo- 
t/.OV/ ca i passenger Train to San Pablo and Martinez. 
(Arrive San Francisco 3:35 p.m.) 



3AA P.M. (daily) San Jose Passenger Train (via Oak- 
• W land Ferry), stopping at all Way Stations. Ar- 
rives at San Jose at 5:30 P.M. 
(Arrive San Francisco 9:35 a.m.) 



3 0A P.M. (daily) Northern Railway Local Passenger 
• OVf Train to San Pablo and Martinez. 

(Arrive San Francisco 9:35 a.m.) 



A f\f\ P.M. (daily) Express Train (via Oakland Ferry), 
^•"^ for Lathrop, Stockton, Merced, Visalia, Sum- 
ner, Mojave, Newhall, San Buenaventura, Santa Barbara- 
Los Angeles, "Santa Monica," Wilmington, Santa Ana, 
San Diego, Colton and Yuma (Arizona Stages and Colo, 



rado River Steamers). Connects at JSTiles with train ar- 
riving at San Jose at 6:55 p.m. " Sleeping Cars " between 
Oakland, Los Angeles and Yuma. 
(Arrive San Francisco 12:40 p.m.) 



4- OO **" M- (Sundays excepted; Vallejo Steamer (from 
"I»V/W Market Street Landing), connecting with trains 
for Calistoga, (the Geysers), Woodland, Knight's Land- 
ing and Sacramento; and at Sacramento with Passen- 
ger Train, leaving at 9:15 p.m. on Tuesdays, Thursdays 
and Saturdays only, for Truekee, Reno, Carson and 
Virginia City. "Sleeping Cars" between Vallejo and 
Carson. (Arrive San Francisco 11:10 a.m.) 

4 00 P-M. (Sundays excepted) Sacramento Steamer 
.Vjyj (f rom Wash'n St. Wharf), for Bsniciaand Land- 
ings on the Sacramento River; also, taking the third class 
overland passengers to connect with train leaving Sacra- 
mento at 9:00a.m., daily. (Arrive Sail Francisoi ^:00 p.m. 

4 Oik P.M. (daily), Through Third Class and Accom- 
• OU modation Train, via Lathrop and Mohave, 
arriving at Los Angeles on second day at 11:55 A.M. 

(ArriveSan FrancUco 7:30 A.M. 



FERRIES AND LOCAL TRAINS. 


From "SAST FRASTCISCO," Daily. 


1 > 

TO | ► 
So 
OAKLAND. | g 


O 

» 

P 


■<Z 3 

03 &» 




•4 


O 
KB 
►■SP 

■ SO 

B 


A 7.00 
7.30 
8.00 
8.30 
9.00 
9.30 
10.00 
10.30 
11.00 
11.30 
12.00 
1-12.30 
1.00 
1.30 
2.00 


p 3.0oU 7.00 
3.301 8.00 

4.00 9.00 
4.30I 10.00 

5.001 11.00 
5.30 12.00 
6.00lp 1.30 
(S.30J 2.00 
7.00 • 3.00 
8.10 1 4.00 
9.201 5.00 

10.30 6.00 


A 7.30 
8.30 
9.30 
10.30 
11.30 
P12.30 
1.00 
3.30 


A 8.00 
t9.30 

Ptl.00 
3.00 
4.00 

ts.io 


A 8.00 

t9.30 

p 3.00 

4.00 

ts.io 


A 7.30 
8.30 
9.30 
10.30 
11.30 
p 1.00 
4.00 
5.00 


A 8.00 
10.00 

p 3.00 
4.30 
5.3 


















5.30 
C.30 
7.00 
8.10 
9.20 
10.30 








tChange Cars 

at 
East Oakland 


Change Cars 

at 
West O'kland 


A 0.10 
pll.45 


*8.10 

'*11.45 


A 6. lOJ "1 DAILY, 
Pll.45 V SUNDAYS - 
'J KXCBPTI5D 


[ 





A 6.10 
p 6.00 



*10.30 p.w. Sundays only to Alameda. 
To FEENSIDE — except Sundays— 7.00, 9.00, 

To SAN JOSE— Daily— 19 :30 a.m., 3:00, 4:00 p.m. 



To " SAJf FRANCISCO," Daily. 



U 

B>" 



I 8.00 
10.00 

' 3.00 
4 30 
5.30 



A 7.30 
8.30 
9.30 
10.30 
1130 
p 1.00 
4.00 
5.00 
6.00 



2 5 



Change Cars 

at 
WestOaklnd.1 



"6 25 
7.00 
S.03 
9.00 
10.03 
11.03 
12,00 
1.00 
3.00 
"3.20 
4.00 
5.00 
6.03 

no.oo 



2, 



At6.45 

7.55 

11.15 

tll.45 

p 3.40 



c>s\> 
a=H§ 



At7.08 
8.15 
11.35 
Ptl208 
4.03 
t4.45 



A 5.40 A'5.00 

I »5.40 

p*7.20 

I "8.30 



tChange Cars 

at 
East Oakland 



OAKLAND. 
(Broadway.) 



a 6.40 A 6.50 
7.40 7.20 
8.401 
9.40J 
10.40 
11.401 
P12.40! 



7.50 
8.25 
8.50 
9.20 
9.50 



1.25, 10.20 

2.401 10.50 

4.401 11.20 

5.40 11.50 
6.40 p 12. 20 

7.50 12 50 

9.00l 1.20 

lO.lOl 1.50 



DAILY, 
SUNDAYS 
EXCEPTED 



1 S I I 



A 5.10 A 5.20 
5.501 6.00 



p 2.50 
3.20 
3.50 
4.20 
4.50 
5.20 
5.50 
6.25 
6.50 
8.00 
9.10 
10.20 



From FERNSIDE— except Sundays— 8.00, 10.00, 11.00 
A.M., and 6.00 P.M. 
FROM SAN JOSE— Daily— 7:05 and 8:10 A.M. 
*Alameda Passengers change cars at Oakland. 
A— Morning, p— Afternoon. 



The Creek Ferry Boat will Run Daily: 

From SAN FRANCISCO, at 7:15 and 9:45 a.m , 12:15, 
2:25, and 4:10 P.M. 

From OAKLAND, at 8:15, and 10:45 A.M., 1:15, 3:15 
and 5:00 P.M. 



" Official Schedule Time " furnished by Anderson & 
Randolph, Jewelers, 101 and 103 Montgomery St., S. F. 
T. H. GOODMAN, Gen. Pass, and Ticket Agt. 
A. N. Towne, General Superintendent. 



CtWARD LIBE. 

British anil North American Royal 
Mail Steamships between NEW YORK and LIV- 
ERPOOL, calling at CJUEENSTOWN. 
Sailing: from New York every Wednesday 

BATAVIA Jan. 30th, March 6th. 

ABYSSINIA Feb. 6th, April 3d 

PARTBIA Feb 13th, March 20th 

CHINA Feb 20th, March 27th 

SCYTHIA Feb. 27th 

ALGERIA March 13th 

BOTHNIA April 10th 

Passage can be secured and all information given on 
application to 

WILLIAMS, BLANCHARD & CO., 
Feb. 9. 218 California st. 



16, 1878. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



11 



Notabilia. 



Itwc 
rtth » I 






lmusing. If It w»n not »o pathetic, to *•-. the enthusiasm 

i l»y i*ll the young 
t, the 
. 
rao« in the / 
jonnial?" which think the 
Mr. I'ryiuit say.": " Mr. I.'T.I is 
liittc k * illnutry. Mm. Hicka! What! 
> i have (Iuuq the same thing royrcli I 
Mni' inki: "It in alwaya Mummer time when 
nam, Ton Lord i- all right. I really thought of marrying', t".>. 
it the lady Wiv* rather "1,1, and the H res of her youth had 
" Marrying is always in order, 1 am just as 
I wan when I en twenty, and 1 expect bo marry nnoe <>r twice 
It-it there'* ntt marry time enough Vet! It ia foolish to marry 
Anthony write-: " 1 consider it |>* rftvtly jitsti- 
ti.il le. and, in fact, nn the whale, oonriderhu all the tircumatani 

am, highly laudable. Thon bast 
all »e:wn- for thine own. ( > Hymen! " Tt is also true that the delicacies 
in »a*i>n are always m be obtained at &wain*i ttttkuuvnt, 213 Sutter 
-t family rastOQnirt in the city. 



I 

■ 



A negro minister, who married rather m*oner after the death of his 
wife tlun his sUtsn thought proper and hea ■! himself as 

" My de.tr brederen and staters, my ;ricf was greater dan I oould 
bear. I tnrneii eberyway for peace and comfort, but none came. I sarched 
; I -turn from Ginisee to Rebelatson, and round plenty promise s to 
de winder, but nary one to de widderer. So I took it da! de good I lord 
didn't waste sympathy on a man when it was in his poworto comfort ins- 
self ; and bavmg a raaa rate chance to marry in de Lord, I did so, and 
would do bo again. Besides, brederen, [ consider dat poor Pntsey was 

just a." dead as she would ever be." His head was level. Himself ami 
his new wife are anions Bradley it Ruloffion'fi celebrities. 

"In choosing a wife," says the PkrenotofftctU Journal, " he governed 
by her chin." Have no personal experience, but we have always under- 
stood that that is the true way they are always governed. 



A poor, silly fool, very much of a moral idiot, having gotten his mit- 
ten, baa lost bis kitten, and is disconsolate thereat. He wants to adver- 
r her after this fashion: " Lost— A Maltese cat ; green eyes, col- 
ored hair, very slender, a sweet growl, won't step in of nights — especially 
when there's, a noise on the other side of the fence— goes by the name of 
' China-gal,' also ' Gentle Annie,' also 'Aunties Niece.' A suitable re- 
ward will be given if delivered to her owner, who has in vain given her 
new milk, and thing's, to keep her at home." Now, that is Tom foolish 
advertising. Our Notabilia man would have gone straight to the point, 
and said: "Bring my Annie back again!" Having got her, he would 
have supped off that Cannp;i> Salmon, with just a slice with it, cut from 
a Fitch of Bacon, Smttk-ered with sauce, and the whole Carpader-ed by 
Emerson Corville, 413 Pine street. 



At the close of the sittings in the Illinois House of Representatives, 
the clerk read the following: " I am requested to announce that the Rev. 
Dr. McFarland will deliver a lecture this evening in the hall on ' Educa- 
tion of Idiots.' Members of the Legislature are requested to attend." 
If he had said "moral idiots," we should have known to whom he was 
referring. He is a fool, if not an idiot, who drinks impure Spring Valley, 
when he can get all the impurities removed from it by a Silica ted Carbon 
Filter, sold by David Bush, New Montgomery street, under the Grand. 

Said the smallest of Legislators, the other day, to a noted lobbyist: 
"What, nil! You take me for one who can be bribed? You insult my 
sense of honor. . . . but in case I really were such a man, how much 
would you give me?" The lobbyist took him to a Bar and Stow-ed away 
his full of whisky, and after that it was lovely. Of course, the legislator 
then wanted Spring Valley to mix with it, and got it. The whisky was 
the Golden Plantation Brand, sold by F. & P. J. Cassin, 523 Front street. 

The following may he seen on a tombstone in a town near Dublin i 

Here lies the body of John Mound, 

Lost at sea and never found. 
Tell you, however, what our Notabilia man long since found. That is, 
that the Hallet & Davis Piano is the best. 



As they were about to quaff, one of the party suddenly called out to 
another, " Hello, Dougherty — you drinking ? Sure it was only yesterday 
ye towld me ye was a taytotler." "Well," said Mr. Dougherty, evidently 
somewhat disconcerted, " you're right, Misther Kelly— it's quite right ye 
are — I am a taytotler, it's tine, but I-I-I'm not a bigoted one! and its 
only Gerke Wine I am drinking. I got it at Landsberger's, 10 and 12 
Jones Alley. 

A counterfeit $5 note was reported circulating around in the town 
of Santa Clara the other day, and, as a consequence, business places were 
generally closed. We, in consequence, took the train, and as we needed a 
first-class cooking range, we read " Notabilia " to learn where to find one, 
and went to De La Montanya's, on Jackson street, below Battery, and 
were satisfied. 

If a man has a " bent of mind," does it necessarily follow that he has 
a crooked intellect ? 



After the Declaration.—" This is perhaps not the first mitten you 
have received ?" " But perhaps the first you have ever given. Miss C." 
But as coin and reputation were all gone, she insisted wpon giving the 
mitten, and took herself to her erewhile despised uncle at Prescott. The 
fellow with the mitten has to cool himself with Napa Soda. 



" I sot me down in thought profound, this maxim wise I drew: It's 
easier for you to love a gal than maik a gal love you! " I don't know 
that, either, but will ask my old friend Smith. Perhaps David Bush's 
new gas burner will throw some light on it. Will go to 29 New Mont- 
gomery street, and see. 



Wholesale Grocers. 



Ki:novAi„ 
l. H ffavfoa.] NEWTON BPOTHERS ft CO., rMmwin Nbwtoh. 

Importer* nml nluil<^nlr<lfi)kr« In ff«M, For«*l|rn COWda uiwl 
ii kllfornla sweet, Ban Franolsoi 

IfOnUa. June 7. 

Doom, 0. t. whkixkr, Baanmantoi I J. T. ci.<>vm, W. \v. Dodos, s. f 
W. W. DODGE ft CO., 

Wholesale (.rorcr*. corner Frout nnil Clny Streets), Sun 
Francisco. April 1. 

TABER, BARKER ft CO., 

Saiece— ere te Phillip**. Tuber ftQo. ( Importers and Wholesale Gro- 
ilifiirniu street, lielnw [''runt., .Sit n KmnclSOO. April 16. 



IN CONSEQUENCE OF SPURIOUS IMITATIONS 

Or I. r.V A- PERKINS' SAUCE, which are calculated to de* 
oeive the public, LEA AN ft- I'JiCKlNS have adopted A NEW LABEL 
BUAR1NU THEIR SIGNATt UK, LEA ft PKRR1NB, which Is placed on every bottle 
rit WOUCBSTBRSHIRti SAUCE, and without which none Is genuine. 

i LEA A PERKINS' Sauce, and see name <«> wrapper, label, bottle and stop- 

Kr wnoleeale mid for export by the proprietors, Worcester : Crosse & Blackwefi, 
■lull in, etc, stc, and i>v grocers and oilmen throughout the world. To be obtained of 
Dee i- MESSRS. CROSS* CO., San Francisco. 



JBIfcTJCJE, 



A. H. OILMAN, 

Importer and Wholesale Liquor ftenler, 308 California 
Street, Offers for s;ilc Kino OM Hour! and Rye Whiskies, Brandies, vintage of 

1820 and 1880, Old Port and Sherry Wines, Stall and Sparkling Wines, eta Agentforthe 
Celebrated CACHET BLANC CHAMPAGNE. Sole Agent for MILLS' STOMACH 
BITTERS. March 4. 

m- PRINTS -&a 
537 SACRAMENTO STREET, 

BELOW MONTGOMERY. 

ASHTON'S LIVERPOOL SALT. 

This celebrated brand of Salt has been in constant use for 
more than half a century in the l&uAern States, where for dairy purposes it 
commands double the price of any other brand of Liverpool Salt. The undersigned 
■ure sole agents here, and otferitto the trade. WILLIAMS, BLANCHARt) & CO., 
Jan, 5. _ 218 California street. 

ORLEANS HOI EL. 

This Hotel having- changed its Management, is now under 
the charge of the undersigned, formerly of the Auzerais House, San Jose, and 
having been thoroughly refurnished throughout, is now first-class in all its appoint- 
ments. The patronage of the public is respectfully solicited. 
Sacramento, September G, 1877. [Sept. 22.] J. M. STAPLES. 

ASTHMA AND CHROMIC kKONCHITIS. 

The most effectual remedy is Datura Tntuln, prepared in 
all forms, for smoking and inhalation, by SAVORY & MOOKK, 143 New 
liond street, London, and sold by them and all Chemists and Storekeepers throughout 
the world. June 30. 



D. F. HUTCTHNGS. 



M. Dunne. J. Sanderson. 

PHtENIX OIL WORKS. 

Established 1S50.— llntcliings * Co., Oil and Commission 
Merchants, Manufacturers and Dealers in Sperm, Whale, Lard, Machinery and 
Illuminating Oils, 517 Front street, San Francisco. Jan. 8. 

BLANK BOOKS 

Sold from stock or manufactured to order from the Carew 
Extra Fine Ledger Paper, by JOHN G. HODGE & CO., Importers, Manufac- 
turers and Wholesale Stationers, 327, 329 and 331 Sansome street, S. F. Nov. 11. 

Wm, Irvine.] IRVINE & LE ERET0N, [A. J. Le Breton. 

Attorneys and Counselors at Law, No. 631 Sacramento 
street, Astor Block, San Francisco. ly 14. 



LEE DARNEAL CRAIG, 

Successor to Frank V. Scudder, Notary Public and Commis- 
sioner of Deeds, 011 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal. August 4 



F 



F 



JOSEPH GILLOTT'S STEEL PENS. 
old by all Stationers. Sole Agent for the ITnitad States: 

MR. HENRY HOE, 91 John street, N. Y. Jan. 5. 

M0EEIS SPETEE, 
Ire and Marine Insurance Agent, 307 California street. 

Dwelling, 507 Post street. January 1, 1878. Jan. 12. 

QUICKSILVER. 
or sale— In lots to snit, by Thomas Bell, STo. 305 Sansome 

street, over Bank of California. Nov. 16. 



J. C. JOHNSON & CO, 
arness and Saddlery of every description. 

street, San Francisco. 



H 



13 and 14 Pine 

Dec. 15. 



L. G. PAETEIDGE, 

Attorney at Lnw, Wo. 6 Montgomery Avenue, corner Mont- 
gomery (third floor), San Francisco. Jan. 5. 

OFFICES OF THE AEROPLANE NAVIGATION CO., 

Jan. 4, No. 607 to 615 Merchant street, San Francisco. 

CHAELES LE GAY, 
American Commission Merchant, - - 1 Rue Scribe, Paris. 

£k-| L,~>4~fcjd\ Salary. Permanent salesmen wanted to sell 

^PJL^C".!" Staple Goods to dealers. No peddling. Expenses paid. Address 
Se] it, 1. j S. A. GRANT & CO. , 2, 4, 6 and 8 Home St. , Cincinnati , 0. 

flK c% t"(\t\ a Tear. Agents wanted. Business legitimate. 

^S"0\9'f Particulars frae. Address J. WORTH & CO., St. Louis, Mo. 

O Gold Plated Watches. Cheapest In the known world. 

Sample Watch Free to Agents. Address A. COULTER & CO., Chicaao. 



$3 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Feb. 16, 1878. 



OUR EXTRACTOR. 

From City and Country Press. 



From the Tuscarora Times-Review we uull the following: The ledge m 
the Diana has been penetrated by the drift, the hanging wall having been strutk a 
few days ago. The distance between the walls is about 13 feet. The ore stringers 
increased in size as they neared the upper encasement, and adjoining the hanging 
nail is about three feet of a fair quality of quartz.^— From the same source we 
learn: A fine ledge has been struck near the graveyard, on the road between the 
Leopard mine and the milL It was found at a depth of 05 feet from the surface, is 
six feet iu width, and contains a two-foot streak of rich ore.— —The Virginia 
Chronicle of a recent date contains the following startling announcement: "W. D. C. 
Gibson. Dr. M. Schnabel, W. S. Haskins, Hank Jewett, of Gold Hill, offer to shoot 
any four men in the State for from $50 to $200." Considering the number of bloated 
capitalists who are said to thirst for the blood of Kearney and Wellock, the gentle- 
men who make this reasonable offer should not remain idle loug.^^From the Pla- 
certille Democrat we learn: A rich porphyry claim has been struck near Thompson's 
Hill. In one day enough rock was taken out to yield when crushed nearly $15,000. 
The claim is notnearly developed, but it is estimated that there is .f250,000 worth of 
rock in sight.— Our neighbors in the State of Nevada are discussing the propriety 
of holding an extra session of the Legislature for the purpose of reducing the tax 
levy from 90 to 40 cents on the $100. It is said the cost of 6uch a session will be 
about $40,000: whereas if the tax stands at the present rates the State will have 
about $300,000 for which it has no use. Happy Nevada! Our sapient legislators and 
rapacious officeholders take care that we have no $300,000 for which the State has no 
use.-^— There appears on the registry list of Stanislaus countv, CaL, the following 
remarkable entry: "John L.Crawford; voting number, 3'J3; register number, 80S; 
age, 29; country of nativity, England; occupation, bog thief."— Home Newspaper. 
-^— The Santa Cruz Sentinel says : The late heavy rains have caused considerable 
damage to the newly made road-bed of the Narrow Gauge Railway through the Los 
Gatos canyon. —At Weaverville, Trinity county, the rainfall for the season has been, 
up to January 27th, 25.15 inches, and the creeks and rivers are higher than they 
have been at anytime since the great flood of 1S01-2.— — Persons familiar with 
Southern Oregon and the mining interests of Jack-on, Josephine and Douglass 
counties, assert that the era of gold mining in that region is just dawning. Pros- 
pectors have sought for and found deep gravel beds, high up in the hills, that prom- 
ise great quantities of gold.-^A petition to the Legislature, praying that the city 
limits of Petaluma may be extended in each direction one-fourth of a mile, is being 
circulated and signed.^— A postal card from H. H Strichfield, of Colusa, says that, 
looking from the Court-hi>use at that place, the country appears like a vast inland 
sea. He thinks that over 50,000 acres of wheat are under water. — Ardioch Ltdger. 
.^We hear that the recert rains sent such floods of water into the Black Diamond 
Coal Mines, through some of the old workings, as to suspend operations for several 
davs, while the water was being pumped out and the iniets barred to its further in- 
trusion. — Contra Costa Gazette— Some of ourMarmers find their early sown grain 
so foul with cheat, thistle and other weeds, that they think of cultivating and resow- 
ingthem.if they have favorable weather for it this month, having confidence that 
they will gaiu by so doing.— Contra Costa Gazette.^— ¥rom the same source we 
learn that, up to the Sth iust., the fall of rain for the season in that neighborhood 
has been 11. 5S inches, and the ground has all it can hold at present. ^— In many of 
the country districis of California the squirrel family have been so reproductive as to 
became a pest, destroying grain and doing other damage, and farmers have sought 
in vain to rid themselves of these troublesome little animals Relief in the shape of 
two young men named Gerow brothers, seems to have come to the unhappy Gran- 
ger at la-t. They undertake to clear any person's place of squirrels for a remunera- 
tion fixed at the "rate of five ceuts per acre for level land, and eight e^nts for hilly 
laud. The modus operandi is by poison; but what kind of poison is kept a close 
secret, as is also the maimer in which it is applied. Whatever the remedy may be, it 
is spoken of by those who have had the advantage of the young men's services as 
beiiiL' highly effect! ve.^— The Pttaluma Argus says: A large number of Japanese 
persimmon trees are being planted in this neighborhood.— According to the Ana- 
heim Gazette several Agaroba trees are bearing on a ranch in Los Angeles county. A 
tree in full bearing is represented to yield tons of pods, which make excellent food 
for cattle.^— Thecelebrated trotting horse, "Smuggler," is now in California, hav- 
ing recently been brought here from the East. Just before starting bis speed was 
tested at Rochester, N. Y., where he trotted three heats in the following remarkable 
time: 2:11, 2:11J, 2:14.— MarysviUe Appeal.—— It is said that three or four valua 
ble galena ledges have been discovered at Marsh Basin, Owyhee county, Idaho. 
Quartz mining is also being prosecuted with great rigor and considerable success in 
that neighborhood.^— It is stated that Dr. Linderman has prohibited any further 
work from being done at the Boise City Assay Office for the present. It will be 
opened again for business as soon as Congress makes an appropriation.— Idaho Ava- 
lanche ^— From the Mendocino Democrat we cull the following interesting informa- 
tion: Around Ventura the rainfall for the season varies from 9 to 16 inches. Barley 
on Summer fallowed lands is now about five inches high, with enough moisture un- 
derground to ensure a very heavy yield. At least 700,000 sacks will b« harvested 
this year. There is about three times the usual quantity of wheat sown. The 
alfalfa and other grasses are in spleudid condition, and there is a brisk demand for 
sheep to eat it. From 10 cents apiece in May last, they have appreciated to $1 75 
for vefy common animals.— —At Santa Barbara the total rainfall, up to 30th ult, 
has been 12.S3 inches. The soil is in splendid condition, and the area under cultiva- 
tion will be very much greater than last year. Work is already well advanced, feed 
is coming forward rapidly, stock are recovering from last year's drought, and begin 
to look sleek again. ——At Los Angeles the total rainfall, up to 30th ult., has been 
9.30 inches. The crops are in perfect condition. The area sown in grain this year 
is fifty per cent, greater than ever was known before. The orange crop is a good 
one, and there promises to be a revival of the vineyard interest The grain crop is 
estimated at 100,000 sacks. There is a large area in alfalfa, and it is coming up very 
thickly.— At San Diego the rainfall, up to 30th ult., has been 0.90 inches. This is 
regarded as the most promising season at that place for the past twenty years. 
Much grain i= already up and growing vigorously. Farmers are seeding even" availa- 
ble acre to grain. The grass is well up and stock flourishing. There is an immense 
area of pasturage this year, and stock men will do well.— At San Bernardino there 
has been sufficient rain to ensure good crops, with occasional showers. Virgin soil is 
being broken up and seeded to grain in all parts of the valley. Grain is already well 
advanced, feed is becoming plentiful all round the hills, and cattle are fattening. ^^ 
At Visalia there is good prospect of a large crop. A large area will yet be sown. 
Fresh feed for stock is becoming abundant and stock is doing well. The probabili- 
ties are that the labor of one or two hundred men will soon be required in this 
county. ^^ Monterey county bas been favored all over with copious rains. A larger 
acreage will be put under crop than during any previous year. Feed is excellent in 
the foothills and mountains, aud stock is recovering rapidly from the effects of last 
year's drought. — Around Bakersfield there is a greater quantity of snow in the 
mountains than has been known for years. Alfalfa is growing rapidly, and a num- 
ber of thousand acres of new land are being seeded. Already there is quite sufficient 
grass for stock.— Around Stockton grain is looking splendidly, more especially the 
early sown Summer fallow. In the northern part of the county grain having, for 
the most part, been sown before the rain, is looking forward, a great deal of it cov- 
ering the ground. Stock of all kinds is doing well, and ten days of warm weather 
will cause an abundance of feed.-^— Some of the alfilerilla on the hills back of this 
city is quite eighteen inches high. Pasturage was never more abundant than now, 
and fat. juicy beef and m utton will shortly abound.— Los Angeles Herald. 

From the Orient. — We have now to announce the arrival of the Pa- 
cific Mail steamship City of Peking from Hongkong via Yokohama, with 
passengers and Government mails, and for cargo, 1,793 tons, of which 706 
tons teas, silks, etc., go East by Central Pacific Railroad. The cargo is 
as follows : 10,035 pkgs. tea, 5C3 pkgs. silk, 38,146 pkgs. rice, 30 sacks 
coffee. For New York— 4,310 pkgs. tea and 512 pkgs. silk. To Chicago — 
2,953 pkgs. tea. To Salt Lake — 248 pkgs. tea, and to San Francisco, 
2,524 pkgs. tea. 



A QUESTION OF PRIVILEGE. 

Senator McCoppin the other day raised a question of privilege in 
the Senate, and dealt some sturdy blows upon an ignoramus in the Board 
of Education, in this fashion : 

Mr. McCoppin — I would like to say a word in reference to myself. 
Will the Secretary read this extract from the Bulletin? 

The Secretary (reading) — " Director Taylor opposed to legislative in- 
terference with the public schools as they now exist. 

" Director Taylor — I believe that Director Leggett's substitute ought 
to be vot^d down, for the reason that Mr. McCoppin does not know any 
thing about the subject which the bill touches. It is always the part of 
an ignorant man tu destroy at one stroke everything that does not suit 
him. To reach one defect, he would sweep out of existence a system of 
twenty years' growth. We might as well abolish all our schools as to 
adopt this measure of the magnificent McCoppin. It is the characteristic 
of the ignorant politician to introduce such legislation as this proposed. 
It is tihie that we enter our protest against this interference from this 
class of politicians — this class of uneducated and unthinking men. I trust 
that there are wise men enough in the California Legislature to defeat a 
measure of this kind. I have too much respect for the intelligence of the 
men in the Assembly and Senate to believe this McCoppin bill can be- 
come a law." 

Mr. MtCoppin — Mr. President, that article which has just been read 
is a part of a report of the proceedings and deliberations of the Board of 
Education of the city and county of San Francisco. Without stopping 
here to comment upon the chaste and elegant language of this scholarly 
school director, I wish to call the attention to this fact : the bill that I 
introduced regarding the subject of education is an exact copy, word for 
word, of the bill which was introduced by the distinguished gentleman 
who then represented Alameda county — Dr. Gibbons — of the last session; 
and that, after receiving the thoughtful consideration of the Senate and 
Assembly, passed both bodies, and failed to become a law only because it 
did not receive the sanction of the Governor. That bill, Mr. President, 
was passed by the following vote of the Senate: 

Ayes — Angnev, Beazell, Bush, Eakin, Edgerton, Evans, Fraser, Gib- 
bons, Graves, Hilborn, Hill, Hopkins, Laine, Lindsey, Martin, McCune, 
McCoppin, O'Connor, Shirley, Spencer, Turner, Tuttle — 21. 

Now, I venture to say— and I think with no exaggeration — that among 
the gentlemen who voted for the passage of that bill were some of the 
most distinguished men that ever sat in this hall. The gentleman who 
lately occupied that chair (Angney), and whose absence I feel, because I 
kuew his usefulness, was fit to grace any legislative hall in the world. 
He was a man capable of taking a position at the head :>f the University. 
He was a scholarly, thoughtful, honest man. He legislated as a surgeon 
deals with a cancer — with knife in hand— and he cut where it was neces- 
sary, and did so unflinchingly. His colleague, hardly less distinguished 
(Mr. Laine) and the eloquent Senator from Sacramento, Mr. Edgerton, 
also voted for that measure ; but, without making any further distinc- 
tions, which may seem invidious, I might say that all the men who voted 
for that bill did bo conscientiously ; and, after two years reflection, and 
knowing what I was about to do coidd not be done without inviting just 
such abuse and vulgar attacks as this, especially in the community where 
I reside, where we have peculiar interests and a peculiar class — upon re- 
flection, I say, I considered it my duty, from conviction, to reintroduce 
this measure and bring it before the Legislature at this session. I have 
done so, and have aoue so iu all honesty, and I hope that the measure 
will receive the attention of this body and also of the other, and that it 
will receive the sanction of the Executive. 

In regard to this man, Taylor, I never met him until three months ago. 
I was then unfortunate enough to be plaintiff in a lawsuit. My friend, 
Senator Shirley, who knew the defendant, suggested to me the propriety 
of a settlement of the matter on the basis of arbitration. I assented im- 
mediately. I named a man under the formula provided by the Code, a 
man distinguished in business, Mr. Tevis, and the defendant named Mr. 
Taylor. I accepted him at once, though I had never seen him before. I 
submitted my case to him, and he occupies the most delicate relations to 
me that a man can occupy — that is, a Judge to determine matters con- 
cerning me and my interests. My judge — my arbitrator, is the man who 
now gets up in San Francisco and speaks in this way. I shall telegraph 
Mr. Tevis to have no further connection with this man in my behalf. As 
to his motive, I cannot say. Matters of legislation sometimes hurt pri- 
vate interests —sometimes property interests are hurt ; but whether or 
not this is so in this case, I cannot say. If it is so, I cannot help it. 

In regard to the bill itself, I will say this: I find that the very best 
and most thoughtful minds in America, like CharLs Francis Adams and 
Wendell Phillips, and the able Governor of ISew York, Mr. Robinson, 
have called attention to the direction in which our common schools are 
tending, and have suggested the propriety of adopting measures to repress 
the extravagance which is now so increasing. I think that it is time that 
California should adopt repressive measures, because the expenses of that 
particular department are far beyond what they ought to be, and it is in 
a particularly aggravated form in San Francisco. Owing to the cosmo- 
politan character of the population there, the people of the various coun- 
tries are ambitious of having their children taught various languages, and 
I think that this is a great mistake. I am so thoroughly American in 
sentiment — having spent some years of my minority, and all my majority, 
in this country — that I am in favor of teaching only the English language 
in the common schools. As for these School Directors, they are the peo- 
ple of an hour. They will come and go and come and go as comes and 
goes the sea. 

We regret to have to record the death of Mr. Thos. Noble, of the 
well-known firm of Noble & Gallagher, house painters and decorators. 
Mr. Noble was an old resident of San Francisco, who, in all relations of 
life, maintained a reputation unblemished. Benevolent, genial, and pos- 
sessed of the most kindly instincts, he had a wide circle of friends, who 
will mourn his loss, and sincerely sympathize with his family in their 
sad bereavement. A good father, a kind friend, and a most estimable 
citizen has been taken from our midst, at the comparatively early age of 
fifty years. 

NOBLE & GALLAGHER, 

Importers ami Dealers in Painters* Materials, House, Sign 
and Fresco Painters, Plain and Decorative Paper-Hangers and Glaziers, No. 43S ' 
Jackson street, between Montgomery and Sansome, San Francisco. Ceilings and 
Walls Kalsomined and Colored. Jobbing promptly attended to. May 13. 






CALIFORNIA ADVSRTI8] 



13 



LIES OF THE DAY. 



ib#a*U: 



with »bi>'.:.". or > 



'An. I t 
Bat* 






"**, «n.1 car i* far u 

■ 
•M In l»»»t b* thatch* 



1«ht. 

1 svw X 



Ban Francisco Lies It U not tnu* thai K. A. Hatherton, tie 

t*ct »'l. t. the ri'/lit/n! 

Hall building, <wut an suthoriUtive |i 

roving tin' narrowness and inefficiency of the 

; that tin- « ttion .>f 

l»y tli*- CominiwnnerR.^— That Hatberton i* 

unlrr » ii t<> frits A Keens for requiring him to write 

til tho people prolific in lies hare removed to the 

'Inr.'.— That Auntie's nice, finding nn place 

n when the wicked cease from troubling and 

■ .try arc at ie*t which means Hamilton, Nevada.^— Ti 

■ t "without his knowledge "r oonaant." Non- 
sense, Doc.!«— ■— Tlial - continue to tell each other's medical se- 

11 .>f it'-ius of the account on which that 

!.— — That Smith ran supply it to him, as he 
haa already famished it to otln-rs ^— 1'h.tt l*r. Blach has given a very 
ry nf the offer to him "f $1,000, which he says 
■ 

ill. would consent ; that, nevertheless, he 

■ i?onj»vnt.^^That l>r. Todd, ex-member of the Board of Bduoa- 

inything about that offer to p,]. t .-h.— That Oculist Smith 

i -' five public exhibition* of immorality in one 

week .»: -^ Tli.it Lenme and the visit at ber prosecutor to her 

food for refit' tion. That Roche, prosecuting his 

wife for being angry at bis abandoning ber and her children, was far from 

a lovely plight t> find e Ii m mt in. — —That the suit of 

Tread w r back property from his Wanton's mother, is a sad 

the proprieties. " "That it was creditable to swear that a 

mother "fail. i d allowed her daugh- 

• a steamer with a man."— That it is obvious that it 

was not discreet to let her go with Treadwell, which is not Baying that he 

- ntleman.^— That the testimony and exhibition of Farron at the 

it humiliating. To be knocked down with a poker by his 
wife, and for what ? Pity if she baa to pay one dime for her good work. She 
example of bow to do it, for which she ought to be rewarded. ^^ 
That when rich men of position, intelligence and wealth, become lost to 
it is do wonder that poor idiots like Nice bring them- 
selves to the gallows. Pity the other fellows don't reach the same place. 
^^That the young men on the Oakland boat are anxious to know who 
cut Will Johnston's hair. 

Sacramento Lies.— It is not true that all tho lies in Sacramento are 
confined to the lobby. They are about equally distributed in the first, 
and third houses— that is, the cabin, steerage and boiler deck.-- — 
That in granting the use of their chamber to hold a masquerade ball, on 
Thursday night, the California Senate designs turning the Capitol into a 
State dance -house. — — That J. C. Flood, of the bonanza firm, is responsi- 
ble for the action of the Sacramento flood. -That there is any conflict of 
religion between Archbishop Alemany, who issued an order to his Church 
for prayers for rain— and would appear, from the surplus water, that the 
faithful have overdone the tiling— and Parson Fitzgerald. Both arealike 
entitled to credit for this pluvial dispensation of Providence. That 
either Mayor Tom Cluuie wanted to be State Library Trustee, or his 
military chief, upon whose Btaff he serves General M. S. Horan, had a 
ipg after the position of Assistant in the Law Library.— — That 
when General Phineas T. Banning, ex-Senator from Los Angeles, met the 
attenuated member from Fresno one day last week, and the parties em- 
I, the floor of the Assembly Chamber sank several inches, to the 

■ nation of the member from Tulare and Kern, the worthy Chair- 
man of the ' lommittee on Public Morals. Had the Cleric of the Senate, 

nt-at-Arms of the Senate, joined the party, such a catastrophe 
might have occurred.^— That when ex Supervisor Wise visited the two 
Bouses last week, he admitted that it took more brains to run a State 
I it me than a San Franeisco Board of Supervisors. On the contrary, 
he is still more strongly impressed with the truth of the words of the 
poet : "Where ignorance is bliss, 'tis folly to be Wise."-— That Senator 
Murphy's [not Sam Seabough's) " big black dog," who puts in an appear- 
ance in the Senate Chamber every morning, is allowed to vote 
when the ayes and noes are called during his master's absence. The 
canine lias too much regard for his eyes and nose. ' — —That the 
senior Assemblyman from Tulare, was ever a member of that education 
6rm once running a male and female academy— the sign of which read, 
•" Jones teaches the boys and Huggs the girls."— That the Speaker of 
the House is either a black, blue or green-berry; fudging from the tinge of 
hi-* goatee, he is a red Berry. That the stuffed barn owl recently set 
up in the State Library represents the wisdom of the Executive, Legislative 
and Judicial Departments of the State Capitol— the bird of Minerva be- 
ing merely placed there to keep watch and ward over mousing book- 
worms, and to see that none are surreptitiously carried away by members 
of the Departments named. That the eloquent member of Assembly 
from Sacramento takes his name from the celebrated Ben Johnson, whose 
epigramatic force bas descended to him. That Governor Irwin was 
much exercised in his mind and was for a long time between a fever and 
;i sweat before he signed the levee bill — levying a tax upon the citizens of 
Sacramento to protect the property of country residents, -who might 
have, had they rallied under the cry of, "Once more to the breach, dear 
friends, once more," have prevented the overflow.-— 'That the same par- 
ties who some weeks since vociferously prayed for rain, are now as ear- 
nestly petitioning the Power that aendeth showers "alike on the just 
and the unjust," bo incontinently "dry up."— —That the citizens of Cali- 
fornia wil] rejoice when the hundred and twenty days constituting the 
Constitutional limit of Legislative sessions has expired— believing in that 
Language of the Good Book which says, " When (.be wicked rule the peo- 
ple mourn."— That two Assemblymen — theg 1 looking blonde bearded 

member from the Eleventh District of San Francisco, and the tall and 
Btalwart assemblyman from San Luis Obispo approached the man who 
controls more rolling stuck than any one individual in the United States 



I 'tmidn of (1 |c a with the in- 

■f " rolling him;' I 

the public tn-.i-ury, like the Levite in the 8a 

sid.\— That Mr. Edward Gibbons, sx-8enatoi from \i 

heer for f habit, wenl t<. thi tans of 

tho Senate for a warrant for hi par di«m.~— That the 
Emm the -one oountv i^ putab d to determine what he was cut out fat by 

mind made up thai h 
mblned; he is prepai b, In the delivery of which, "when 

i bis month* 1 let not Senatoi Mnrphy'i dag bark. We make no 

1 "a rat- 
tling " among the dry bones before the close of the session That Phi- 

r Pickett will decline the California Commissjonenhip to the Paris 
ition; he will wait until it is offend bim before doing anytl 

raah.< That Lieutenant-Governor Johnson, President o'l 

who Is obliged by his official duties to alternate between the State Prison 

atSanQuentln sod the state Senate at Sacramento, is frequently in 

doubt as to which body he is presiding over.— -That a aenaU Call I evei 

-u v at the BtadL Crook, Thai, both Houses meet after the 

theater in front of the Orleans Hotel.— —That Murphv, of Del Norte, 

tried and failed to oatoh a Crane. That Sherman says Cranes are mi- 
birds, and he will have none of them.— That Hicks would like 

to, bul was frightened by the ill .success of his associates.— That Capt. 
Thompson, of the Alto, left town on very short notice."— That be is be* 
ing sought for with a shotgun. ■■—■That it is said Al Morrieywill live a 
hundred years, he is so fresb.— That he and Brownbardt would make a 
good team. ^— That .Murphy, of S. L. <>., is the lady's man of the Sen- 
ale. ^^ That Smith is the talker. 



ART JOTTINGS. 
The next exhibition of the Art Association is expected to be the 

most successful one yet had. As it does not take place until May, ample 
time has been given the artists to prepare for it, and it is hoped that the 
occupation of the borrowing committee will be gone. 

We have always contended that the artists themselves are to blame for 
the partial failure of the Association to do the work expected of it. The 
public contribute liberally to its support, and, really, get little in return. 
And why '! Simply because the artists do not work together, and put all 
their important pictures in the Association gallery, thereby making it 
attractive to the public generally. 

There are thousands of visitors from the country each month who would 
gladly avail themselves of the privilege of visiting the gallery, but to 
begin with, its location is not one easily found, and then it is not half the 
time open, or, rather, it is en deshabille, and might as well be closed. 

Mr. Julian Hix has at Morris, Schwab & Co. S a couple of good exam- 
ples of his work. They are perhaps a little wanting in finish, but the ef- 
fect is excellent, especially in the mountainous background of one of them. 
The excellent picture by Benoni Irwin, " Girl at the Fountain," is also 
here, and in their window the past week has been exhibited a fine exam- 
ple from the Dusseldnrff school, "The Poacher's Cottage," a large pic- 
ture containing many figures carefully treated ; it is by " J. Welch," of 
Munich, and is a work of fine quality and careful grouping, indicating 
that no haste was made in its execution. 

" A Winter Scene," by W. S, Macy, of Munich, at the same gallery, 
is one of those low-toned and quiet pictures, so much sought after now 
among art collectors. We miss from this gallery another of H. Hum- 
phrey Moores' small pictures, "The Reverie." This is the second of his 
works sold here, and itseems a little remarkable that neither the "Moorish 
Merchant" or "Almeh" have as yet gone into private hands. Mr. Yelland 
has in this gallery a large work, one of his usual quiet water scenes, full of 
poetry and careful finish. Mr. Yelland is one of the most conscientious of 
our local artists, and has proven a most excellent teacher in the School of 
Design, which, by the way, is increasing in membership at a rate quite in 
advance of what might be expected of it, judging from the general dull- 
ness in art circles. 

James Hamilton has placed in Amos Currier's window, on Kearny 
street, a new picture, a coast view taken at Point San Pedro and looking 
to the northwest. The water, as is usual with Mr. Hamilton's works, is 
well done, full of motion, and of the peculiar color which indicates shoal 
water. This artist, we learn, is engaged upon several commissions lately 
received, which will delay somewhat his coutemplated departure for the 
East. 

BONES AND CUBIC SPACE. 
We are no advocates of exhumation, and have no desire to lie be- 
side our ancestors in the far East. Much less do we approve of the Chi- 
nese practice of exporting human bones to China. Nevertheless, we re- 
spect the prejudices of those who wish in death to lie with dear friends, 
and the patriotism which is expressed in the Chinese practice. And we 
feel ashamed of a country which, finding its population unable to compete 
with barbarians in sobriety, industry and thrift, resorts to the meanness 
of special persecution in the hope of driving them away. It is simply 
ridiculous to talk of endangering the public health, if only reasonable pre- 
cautions are enforced. Prejudices and superstitions of this kind are too 
deeply engraved in human nature to be suppressed by law. The law will, 
therefore, be evaded, and concealment will originate evils which may 
prove really dangerous. The recent raid amongst the Chinese for violat- 
ing the Cubic Space ordinance is another instance of special action on the 
part of the police unworthy of a nation with pretensions to render equal jus- 
tice to all its citizens. If filth and overcrowding are to be dealt with by the 
police, let them begin at the City Hall, where the Cubic Space law is vio- 
lated every night, and where the filthy blankets are alive with vermin. 
It would be a goodly sight to have the Mayor and Supervisors fined, and 
until they have been, the forfeiture of Chinese bail must be regarded as a 
public robbery. 

St. John's Presbyterian Church, Post street, between Mason and 

Taylor.— The \l'-v. W. A, Scott, D. D., pastor, will preach Sunday at 11 
a. M, and 74 p. M. Praise Service at 6£ A. M. Sunday School and Bible 
classes at 9JJ a. m. 

A health journal says: "The clothes of different families should, 
for sanitary reasons, be washed apart." Our laundryman goes still far- 
ther, he washes our shirts an I I attons apart. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Feb. 16, 1878. 



Court Chat, 

And the Upper Ten Thousand at Home and Abroad. 

Victor Emmanuel. — Eben trovato. The following anecdotes of Vic- 
tor Emmanuel are attributed to an exiled prince: When still only Prince 
Royal, Victor Emmanuel, accompanied by a young aide-de-camp, whose 
features closely resembled those of King Charles Albert, and who, in fact, 
had the best reasons to resemble him, piid a visit to Queen Victoria. The 
Queen said to the Prince Royal of Savoy: "I have never seen your father 
the King ; will you describe him to me ?" Victor Emmanuel, with a 
military candor, turned to his aid-de-camp, and said: "Your Majesty, 
here is his living portrait ; this is his son." His august interlocutor im- 
mediately changed the subject. The second anecdote dates back only a 
few years. The King of Italy was in private audience with one of the 
dispossessed princes of the House of Tuscany, and during the flow of fa- 
miliar conversation said, " My dear friend, I can easily understand your 
dissatisfaction ; but kindly consider that from my position, brought about 
by circumstances out of my control, I was bound to either kick you out 
of Tuscany or be kicked out of my kingdom myself by my subjects. With 
such an alternative, you may easily understand that I preferred to remain 
on the throne." A friend iu Rome sends us a few last details about the 
King's death, which may not, he thinks, have appeared elsewhere in 
print. When it was announced to him by Professor Bruno that all hope 
was over, and that he should prepare himself to receive the last rights of 
religion, he stared in a confused manner, twirled his thumbs, and said 
nothing. When it was repeated to him, he continued to twirl his thumbs 
and. said, "Then let it be done at once." The etiquette of the House of 
Savoy forbids embalming before forty-eight hours after death, and by that 
time putrefaction had set in. The body consequently was placed in a 
bath containing two hundred quarts of solution of arsenic ; but the pro- 
cess was not a success. The King's body, as it lay in state, was much 
puffed out, and his face discolored. Humbert refused permission for the 
removal of the bowels. The lying-in -state was a poor affair and- an un- 
pleasant spectacle. The King was tilted nearly upright, bis head thrown 
back, and little else was seen but his chin, which appeared like wax. The 
great mantle, which looked uncommonly like cotton-velvet, was dragged 
over his feet in a tight and awkward way, and tacked with visible nails to a 
board. The candelabra, with the exception of six, were theatricallj' taw- 
dry; the vases were gilt only in front; and the crimson satin-damask that 
lined the walls and formed the canppy was faded and creased. The Pope, 
on hearing of the King's death, said, "I was expecting it ; I have forgiven 
him: let us pray for his soul." — World. 

The marriage of the two Prussian princesses, which stands fixed for 
February 18th, will be made the occasion of very brilliant and imposing 
festivities. One very prominent feature in the traditional ceremonial is a 
"torchlight dance," to be performed by twelve Ministers of State. This 
part of the programme will be strictly observed. But it ought to be re- 
marked that the designation "dance " which has been given to the solemn 
movements and gestures of the eminent state officials who are responsible 
for the common weal is misleading. There is nothing Terpsichorean in 
the pas and bows which constitute this courtly performance. Another 
ancient custom will be omitted on the present occasion. It is usual for 
royal brides and bridegrooms in Prussia to play a rubber of wbist with 
the other royal personages attending the wedding, immediately after leav- 
ing the chapel, as an illustration of the " game of life " upon which they 
are about to enter as "partners," playing against all the rest of the com- 
pany in turns. To play against twenty-five sets of partners would ob- 
viously take up too much time, therefore the cards will not on the pres- 
ent occasion be called into use. On the other hand, the historic bride's 
polonaise will be duly performed, with double honors, in the evening. The 
polonaise in Germany opens the ball. And it is usual for the bride to 
dance it in succession, or rather to walk it, with all princely cavaliers 
present, the bridegroom paying the same attention in turn to all princely 
ladies. In the present instance brides and bridegrooms will dance a trois, 
the two brides dancing in succession with every princely cavalier, one 
right and one left, and the two bridegrooms escorting in the same manner 
and at the same time every princely lady round the room. — Court Journal. 

Kasanlik, one of the headquarters of the Russian Army in Turkey, is 
famed for its unrivaled display of flowers, more especially the roses from 
which the " Ottu of Roses " is distilled. These roses were made very free 
use of by the inhabitants, especially the ladies, when His Imperial High- 
ness Nicholas, Duke de Leuchtenberg, who took Kasanlik, and has been 
the hero of many of the most dashing affairs of the advance of Gourka's 
Cavalry throughout the campaign, entered the place on his splendid char- 
ger. The Duke and horse were completely covered with these roses by 
the ladies, and at Timova this shower of roses was repeated on Duke and 
horse as before. This charger is, by the by, an English horse, known in 
England as Capt. W. H. Patten- Saunders's Valorous ; it was a winner of 
the Guards Cup at Croxton Park, etc. — Court Journal. 

A very little beauty goes a long way in a Princess. The "lovely" 
Margherita of Savoy is, to unprejudiced eyes, a rather dingy yet pallid 
blonde with a very prominent nose, and she is unquestionably the worst 
dresser in any Court. But she is simpatica, which means that she has 
something better than beauty, grace, or even taste ; and she has a way of 
always saying and doing the right thing, which will stand her in good 
stead. It would be curious to see the great Republican party in Italy 
held for a while in check by the address and sweetness of one plain girl! 

The following inscription is to be set up over the gateway of the 
Pautheon at E-ome: "Italy, with a mother's pride, with a daughter's 
grief, supplicates for the great King, who was a faithful citizen and a tri-* 
umphant soldier, the immortality of the righteous and the heroic." The 
stone, which will be placed in the chapel destined for the King, is as sim- 
ple as its inscription: "Victor Emmanuel, the first King of Italy." 

Prince Leopold has been compelled, for the present, to abandon his 
intention for taking holy orders. The Prince has lately expressed a strong 
desire to enter the Church, and, although Her Majesty was averse to his 
selecting such a career, he has, in spite of all opposition, held resolutely 
to his purpose, and finally gained his point. His health is now the only 
obstacle to his taking orders. 

It is a singular coincidence that the death of Victor Emmanuel, the 
King of Italy, took place on the same day of the same month as that on 
which Louis Napoleon, the Euipbrorof the Erench, died at Chislehurst. 



REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS 

Becorded in the City and County of San Francisco. California, for the 
Week ending February 13, 1878. 

Compiled from the Reco-rds of tJie Mercantile Agency of John McKiUop & Co. , 
401 California Street, £>a?i Francuco. 



Thursday, February 7th. 



GRANTOR TO GRANTEE. 

L C Ranck to Elizabeth Wright . 

Peter Dean to Geo H Cook 

Myer Mansfield loJEIla Robinson. 

F A Huntington to A L Fish 

R E Associates to Ellen Higgios.. 

And H Schon to Jnlia H Croseett. 
T Von Borstel to L Von Borstel.. 
Andw Black to W A Hughes 



OESCRIPTION. 



(PRICE 



Dominick Coyne to Michl Phelan. 

Jus Barnes to P JTobin 

Patk Tobin to Mary A Barnes 

A W Von Schmidt to Henry Hart 



Lots 24, 25, blk 52, City Land Assn 

W Church, 235 s22d,s 25x117:6 .. 

Lot 20. hlk44 College Hd Association., 

Se Kin?, 335 be 6th, ne 100x120.. 

Warranty deed, n Eddy, 44 e Devisadro, 

e 21x93:6 

W Bartletf, 235 s 24th, s 25x117:6 

N Tvler, 100 e Broderick, e 37:0x137:6... 
Uud % lots 3, 24, blk 39, R R Av Ex Hd: 

and lots 29, 30, blk 37, Nucleus Hd As. 

Lot 236, Gift Map No 3 

N Green, 114:8 e Larkin, e 22:10 x n 60.. 

S Russell, 200 w Hyde. \v 20x00 

E 21et nv, 250 n Sacramento, e 120, n 120, 

n\v 120. a 134 to beginning 



700 

380 



7,862 
2.5(0 

Gift 



5 

2,800 

800 



Friday, February 8th- 



Sunny Vale Hd As to F B Luty..,Lota 1 to 14, blk 12: lot 2, blk 18; lot 6, 
blk 22; lots 1, 2, 12, blk 28; lots 1, 10, 
blk 41 

DVB Henarie to H F Crane |Nw Bay and Jones, n 137:6x137:6 

Wm Winter to John H Onsioll.. .;W 8th av, 203 s M, s 30x120 

Warren Roberts to D B Franklin. 



E B Maatick to Bedelia Boyd 

Henry W Bradley to J A Bradley. 



Cily and Co to D B Murphy 

A W Von Schmidt to Grace Boree 



Lots 8, 9j 14, 15,blk 642, Pt LnboB Av Hd 
Association 

F Broadway, 162:6 w Van Ness, w 3(ix 
137:6 

518 D 232, nc Madrid and China av, n 150 



Geo H Glidden to Chas A Dunn. 
Delavan Soag to Com'l Ins Co.. 



Sw Cappand22d. w 80x122:6 

W 22d av, 37:9 s Sacramento, w 140, s 

51:3, ne 140. n 37 to beginning 

E Church, 200 s Kate, b 150, e 69, n 150, 

w 12 to beginning 

W Jones, 6S:8 n Post, n 58:9x137:6 



$7,560 

1,882 

200 

1 

5 

500 

175 

2, 00" 
3,000 



Saturday, February 9th. 



CbriB Spencer to Albert Meyer. . . . 
A W Von Schmidt to Henry Coad 



City and Co S F to C W Randall. 



MajCeoj Assn to Wm Davenport, 
DEDeweytoMH Turril! 



Peter A Burnett to Same 

Julia I B-»rncman to Jjib Smith. 
Hans H Behr to Henry Campe. 
Wm J Gunn to John L Leisa... 



A W Von Schmidt to T Fanning 



Sw Geary and Brodei-ick, s 137:6x100 

W 20th av, 150 n Sacramento, w 120, n 
220, ee 120, s 209 to beginning 

Nw Jackaon and Devisadero, w 137:6x 
137:6 

Lot 1 in section 39 

Sw Buchanan and Green, w 137:6x275: 
also, sw Sacramento and Walnut, w 
137:6x201:7^; and sundry lots indiffer- 
ent parts of city 

Ne Jackson and Buchanan, n 127:8yx 
137:6 

W Sherman, 82:6 n 20th, n 27:6x100 .... 

W cor Sth and Bryant, nw 62:6x82:6 

Nw Arlington, 303 ne Miguel, ne 60, nw 
100:13*, bw 55, selOO to beginning 

Sw Sacramento and 22d av, w 140 x s 
37:9 



#6,000 
520 



10 

450 

5 

600 

165 



Monday. February 11th. 



D E Allison to Arthur L Fiah 

EVa Etta Moore to H G Williama 
John Hinkle to Rosa Avery and wf 
C D Upton to John Hiukl 
Henry Hinkel to Same... 
Wm Hoi lis* to Hermann II Hencke 
H W Bordwell to G H Mattel 
Wm Hale to II H Hencke.... 
Jereh Miller lo Same 



Sloth, 160 w Nop, 8 115 x w 50 

S Pine, 1 12:6 e nyde, c 25x137:6 

Lot 53, Gift Map No 3 

Lote 53, 55, 57, same 

Same 

S California. 156:3 e Webster, e 25x137:6 

Se24th and York, e 40 x s 100 

S California, 156:3 e Webaler, e 25x137:6 
Sam. 



Jacob Cohen to Jno W Coleman.. Ne Dupont and Geary, e 40, n 6*1, s 42:6, 

| wl9:6, a 60, w 46 to beginning 

James P Pierce to David FleminglS Vallejo, 26 e Sansome, e 25x80 

J Cohn to IsaaiMCohn INe Geary and Dupont, n 102:6, e 60, b 

60, w 46 lo beginning 17,935 

C H Bradford to Est of S Mead...|Se Market, 68:9 ne^lth, se 137:0x68:9.. .. | 27,500 



>.00O 

),500 

300 

70 

350 

5 

1 

5 

i,S00 



Tuesday, February 12th. 



A W VonSchmidt to II Armstrong 
Henry Ahrcns to T Von Borstel.. 

Mnria Larkin to Henry Hinkle.. . 

Henry W Larkin to Same 

Geo W Cope to W L Uhler 

C P Duane to M J Redding 

Wm Hollia to L S Stevens 

Jno N Genin, jr to Jno N Guuin.. 
Wm Hayes to Jno A Stanly 



S K Addoms to Horace F Smith. . 

Same to W R Lathrop 

Rebecca M Kcuniff to RS Mallon 
Eat of Jas Monroe to Jas Scobie.. 



S Sacramento, S2:6 c 21st av, e 50x104... 
Und l-7th u Pine, 230 w Larkin, w 150, n 

75. e 17, n 62:6, e 1-33. s 137:6 to be-?.. . 

Ne3d,250 se Mission, ne 77:6x nw 25 

Same 

Ne Eddy and Lacuna, n 120 x e 137:6.... 

E Howard, 22.1 a 17th, s 25x120. 

N 21st, 134 w Valencia, w 26x115 

Lot 47, blk 574, S F Cenlra) Park Hd.... 
Sw Noe and Market, s 3it0:9'.i, w 240, s 

130, w 40, n 197:5^., ne ?AX:\% to beg.. 

W Kanaaa, 100 sYolo, s 25x100 

" 125S ■■ " 

W Mason, 117:6 s Broadway, 8 20xl3i:6. 
E Camino real or old road, dial 94 sfrom 

Widow Beroal Reservation, e 129, s 7S 

w 131, □ 7S to beginning 



$ 150 

30,000 
15,000 
5 
10,000 
2,51)0 
5,760 
250 

1 
325 
325 
Gilt 



"Wednesday, February 13th. 



JO Johnston to G W Halght [Lots 24, 25, blk 52. City Land Assn 

Tlios Kearney to Marv McFaddin. W Guerrero, 77 n 13th, w SO x s 25., 

Dani Rogers to Abel T Winn |S Haight, 206:3 w Fillmore, a 120 x w 50 

P B Pico to EW Scott iTJndl-16th of P Schenebeck Grant 



A Wallace to Francisco Babino.. 



J P Green to E W Scott 

Wm E Dnrnett to George Cook 
Tlios S Miller to Minprva C Miller 

Jno Kelley to Jacob Freeman 

Jno Hinkle to J S Portoia .. 
C LGuibertto John Hinkle 
Ell: 



E Harwood alley, 95:9 s Filbert, and 77:6 

e Dupont, s I9:4j£xe60 

Undl-16th of P Schenebeck Grant.... 

Nw 26th and Capp, n 65x115 , 

S Bush, 137:6 e Tavlor, e 20:6 x s 137:6. . 
S Powell av, 25 w Calif'rnia av, w 25x100 

Se Ji:ssie, 412:6 sw 4th, bw 20x70 

Same 

one Dalton to Patk Dalton.... N.v Califnia and Laurel, w 137:6xl32:7'a 
I and nw Devisadero and Washington, 

w 137:6x256 

Same to Same Nw Pacific and Devisadero. w 255x114.. 

JnoProrrtoDM Dickson !Subsl,2, 3, Havley'B Map No 1 of P V 

I lots 319 10 333 



$ 150 

5 

3,000 

50 

1,400 
5 
5,500 
Gift 
Grant 
3,100 
2,950 



20,000 
10.000 



16, 1878. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



15 



Cradle. Altar, and Tomb. 



CRADLE. 

«. Kcbrouy 8Ui, i ■. a daughter, 

■ daughter. 

tl)|>bcll, A M'll. 

morula, a aon. 
bmitli, a ton. 
I * -ill. a uon. 

li.mipt.ni. a daughter. 
.nl NvMman, .. 

s. murwcll, a son. 
► 

: H II \\il>,m, n win. 

ALTAR. 



If* 



nvmra in thi- dty, Feb. LOtb, s Braamriok bo Annie Bcbwmr. 
Pftb. iitii, P .' OolenikA Gsnin to Fhuio Tltu 

iham to Mary Mcllugh. 
■ Emma M. lad win. 
Peb. 10th, Junea Hi pi Barrett. 

in un> . in. Ken 9,11. Uoldersbach to K. Heydcnrolch. 
h, John Hinkcl to Adi M Hulbert. 
i ..1 Liici to Henrietta Hiron. 
:V ■:> !>th. Thon-a* M, K. , to Nellie J. Johnson. 
r>h l"2th, M>>-<..- Mover to Amanda Hoffman. 
Pratt t.. Odelia Beck. 
1*ower*-i i, rhoa. J, Power* to Mamie Donovan. 

laovx- In this city. Feb. 11th. Carlos White to Linn Wood 

TOMB. 
Pi b. 12th, Edward C. Austin, aged 4£ years. 

atherine Boyle, aged BO 
. Feb. LOth.Thoi fears and 10 months. 

DoBMAJi - lo tin* dty. Fob. l-th, Lino Dorman, aged 27 yean and 5 months 
Brass— In thb iit>. Feb kl yean and fl months. 

Pirroft— In this city. Feb. I0tn, George K. Pen ton, aged il yean and n months. 
waos in this city, Feb. 11th, Adelaide Qoodmanson, aged l year. 
In this city, Feb. 9th, Mrs. Annie Jenkins, a^ed 64 years and 7 months. 
Moasuut >e— In this mty, Pen. 10th, Frands B. Morehouse, aged 67 years. 
Nohlk— In this dty, Feb. Bth, Thomas Noble, aged BO years. 

In this city, Feb. 7th, David K. Nichols, aged 4U years. 
Bon — In this dty, Feb. 13th, John Rose, acred 3S . . 

Thomas -In this city. Feb. 7th. St ott Thomas, aged 28 years. 
WiBDin this: city, Feb. 12th, Patrick Ward, aged 50 years. 

USEFUL KNOWLEDGE AND POPULAR SCIENCE 
Variations in Milk.— The quality of milk— that is, of the genuine ar tj_ 
cle as it comes from the cow— is well known to vary considerably. The 
analysis of a large number of undoubtedly pure samples shows that good 
milk ought to yield very nearly 1'2 per cent, of solid matter. It has been 
stated on good authority that while the best milk is sometimes found to 
contain 13 per cent., circumstances, such as the season of the year, pas- 
. ami the general condition of the animal yielding it, may reduce 
lid ingredients to 11 per cent,, and this appears to be generally 
considered the minimum, although 10 per cent, of solid material is suffi- 
cient to pass any wrapie in a court of justice. This low standard has, 
we presume, been adopted partly to allow for trifling inaccuracies of analy- 
sis. Accoruing to Professor Boedeker, however, this may represent the 
actual quantity of solid matter in milk. He has been experimenting, 
and finds that a cow giving milk with 13 per cent, of solid ingredient in 
the evening may in the morning yield milk of only 10 per cent, of solids. 
The fatty matter, he finds, increases very considerably as the day ad- 
vances. In the early morning it is only 2^ per cent., by noon it has be- 
i :;.\, and towards the close of the day it rises to 5-f per cent., or more 
than double that of the morning. Thus it would appear that 16 ounces of 
milk, which, taken in the morning, will yield only half an ounce of but- 
ter, would in the evening give rather more than an ounce. From Professor 
Boedeker's statement, too, it appears that the same cow that in the eve- 
ning of any day might yield a fluid capable of passing inspection with 
honors, might, if she chanced to be put to the test in the early part of the 
day, get her owner into serious difficulties. Casein is increased to some 
extent in the course of the day, albumen is diminished, while the propor- 
tion of salt in the fluid undergoes no material change. — Globe. 

Eggs. — On eggs and milk, indeed, man may not only live, but prosper 
exceedingly. During the past year we paid, as a nation, nearly two mil- 
lions and a half pounds sterling for eggs bought of foreign farmers, in addi- 
tion to perhaps as much more for those of home origin. This enormous 
sum is, of course, just so much money lost to our lordly agriculturists, 
who despise the profit made from such trifles as eggs. Not so the French 
small peasant proprietor, from whom we bought most of this £2,472,481 
worth of eggs. In 1877 it was calculated that there were in France 
45,000,000 of hens ; the receipts from poultry for the table equaling 
66,120,000, while the eggs bring £7,320,000. In England it is chiefly the 
large farmers or proprietors who pay any attention to fowls ; the smaller 
ones despise them. They keep a pig or two, though poultry is infinitely 
more profitable as a live stock for their little holdings. This is undoubt- 
edly bo. At this moment, according to an agricultural contemporary, the 
price of new-laid eggs in the London suburbs is 2&d. each. This extrav- 
agant price is wholly due to scarcity. Yet even at that potent figure the 
supply does not equal the demand. Some of the dealers, rather than dis- 
appoint their customers, are setting up "henneries " on their own account, 
and it they will only remember that hens, in order to lay, must be fed, 
and have somewhat more exercise than what a backyard covered with 
wire netting affords, they will most probably find their reward in a hand- 
some profit. One large dairy company is giving twopence each for fresh 
laid eggs, to sell again to customers, but find it impossible to obtain 
enough. Even the importation of French eggs is not making them cheaper, 
so that the prospect of eggs becoming like oysters, a luxury, and not a ne- 
cessity of life, seems not far from being realized. — Echo. 

Telegraphing Without Wires. —It does not require any boldness on 
the part of the prophet to predict that the present year will see many re- 
markable changes in Telegraphy. Instead of tending mere signals from 
which the message has to be spelt out by the operator, there is more than 
a possibility that the Telephone and its modifications will soon provide 
the means of telegraphing in words, and besides the phonograph of Mr. 
Edison, which appears capable of recording the actual words uttered and 
so relieving the reporter of the " mistakes that are often unjustly placed 



to hi- 1 the d fa u uw y of i method >>f t»-l- 

ufeesed thai I howevsTi 

is itfll literally " In the oloi I j meant of I 

, d. that Pro- 
wl in transmitting atonal* without 
wire. The discovery is one, however, that "ill be vigorouily followed op, 
f.>r it i- obvious that then are many situations: in which « iret oonld not 
he conveniently laid where a means of telegraphing would be of the first 
importance. Bv means of kites attach .lining a fine 

copper-wire, he has succeeded En transmitting signals over an air-space of 
ten miles, and there is no reason to doubt that the discover; I 
considerable development, 

A Magic Pipe. The Parisians have a happy method of turning the 
dieoovbriefl of science to a practical account, which meant that thej poed 
il\ utilise them for commercial purposes. A short time ago they seized 
opon -'in Idea that had been utilized in the production of a plain and prac- 
tically useless " barometer," really a hygrosoope, The salts of cobaltnave 
the propriety of changing color when an abnormal quantity of moisture 
is present in the atmosphere. In England the public were made familiar 
with it in the shape of plain pieces of paper, but in Paris bunches of paper 
flowers were sold, which changed color when the air was unusually laden 
with watery vapor. Some ingenious caterers for the public amusement 
have recently hit upon a method of utilizing the properties of the salts of 
silver to produce a magic pipe. An ordinary pipe is coated with a mixture 
of ether and alcohol, in which is dissolved about 10 per cent, of camphor 
and the same of borax, with asmall quantity of nitrate of silver. As 
Boon as the pipe is used it becomes intensely brown, owing to the change 
of color of the silver salt produced by the exposure to' light, aided by 
heat. Proverbs, portraits, political watchwords, and caligraphio charac 
ters of various kinds may be traced on the pipe, and these appear after a 
few moments exposure to the light. The "magic pipe" thus becomes a 
political messenger of some importance. 

An Unknown Narcotic Plant— "lam tempted," writes Major R. 
Stuart from Fort an Prince, " to notice a plant that grows here of such 
strong narcotic powers that, in the hands of a skillful practitioner, it will 
produce coma of any intensity or duration, or even death itself when bo 
intended. The knowledge of this plant is confined to a few families, who 
transmit the secret as an heirloom from generation to generation, and the 
heritage is highly prized, confirming, it is thought, the power of miracle 
workers and priests, for the plant is in many ways used in aid of solemn 
imposture, superstition, and even crime. The power thus exercised is 
called "wanga," a word that inspires the African with awe and dread. 
Ihe wanga priest can throw into a death-like coma, and knowing the mo- 
ment of returning consciousness, he will make a show of recalling to life. 
If a burglary is to be committed, he can, by means of his art, cast a deep 
sleep on all indoors ; and one may understand how he can attain other 
forbidden ends in the same way. An experienced botanist could not fail 
to discover this plant, which, as an antesthetic, would no doubt prove a 
valuable acquisition to medical science." 

The Liquefaction of Gases.— It is a remarkable fact that M. Gail- 
letet showed his experiment on the liquefaction of oxygen on December 
16th, in the laboratory of L'Ecole Normale, Paris, before several mem- 
bers of the Institute, and that M. Raonl Pictet arrived at the same re- 
sult, by a totally different process, at Geneva about the same time. The 
C'omptes Rendus, for December 24th, gives a drawing of the apparatus 
used by M. R. Pictet, and a note from M. L. Cailletet, " Dela Condensa- 
tion de VOzygme et de VOxyde de Carbone." Eight days after this, in the 
same laboratory, in the presence of Deville, Boussingault, Bertholet, and 
others, M. Cailletet reduced nitrogen to the condition of little drops, and 
hydrogen to the form of a vapory cloud. All gases, without exception, 
can therefore be condensed into liquids. 

F. C. Snow.] 



[W. B. Mat. 



SNOW & MAY'S ART GALLERY. 

SNOW A MAT, 

IMPORTERS AND MANUFACTURERS OF 

Pictures, Frames, Moldings, autl Artists' Materials. 

21 Kearny St., near Market, S. F. Dec. 19. 



W. Morris. 



J, F. Kennedy. 



Jos. Schwab. 
MORRIS, SCHWAB & CO, 

Importers and J>ealers in Moldings, Frames, Engravings, 
uhromos, Lithographs, Decak-omanie, Wax and Artists' Materials, 21 Post 
street, nearly opposite Masonic Temple, San Francisco. Feb. 4. 

A DEAD SHOTI—48 OUT OF A POSSIBLE 50! 

Steele's Cough Mixture, a compound of Squills, Senega, 
Anise, and other well known Vegetable Remedies. Prepared and sold by 
JAMES G. STEELE & CO., Chemists and Apothecaries, 
Nov. 10. No 310 Kearny street, bet. Pine and Bush, S. F. 

BAGS, TENTS AND HOSE, 

NEVILLE & CO., 

113 Clay and 114 Commercial Streets, 

^ San' Fkancisco. [May 24, 



BRITISH BENEVOLENT SOCIETY OF CALIFORNIA. 

Attendance, daily, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., by the under- 
signed, to receive subscriptions and donations, and to furnish all information 
relating to the Society. J. P. McCUURIE, Secretary, 

Oct. 23. 730 Montgomery street. 



CASTLE BROTHERS.— [Established, 1850-] 

Importers of Teas and East India Goods, Nos. 213 and 215 
Front street, San Francisco. Jan. 13. 

Dan Z. Yost.] [E. F. Child, Member S. F. Stock Exchange 

CHILD & YOST, STOCKBROKERS, 

No. 322 Montgomery St. [Jan. 12. 



G 



THOMAS DAY, 122 AND 124 SUTTER STREET. 
as Fixtures, Clocks, Bronzes and Holiday Specialties, in- 
chiding Fan Fire Screens, Brass Andirons and Candlesticks, and a choice selec- 



tion of Bise Ware, 



Dee. 8. 



O 



J. BECITINGER, M.D., 
f the University oT Vicuna, has removed to the southwest 

corner of GEARY and DUPONT. Jan. 26. 



16 



SA^T FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Feb. 16, 1878. 



AMERICAN FEELING TOWARDS ENGLAND. 

The complications of the present war in Europe have furnished an 
admirable opportunity for observing the sentiment of the American peo- 
ple towards England. Hitherto it lias always been difficult to get at the 
true nature of this feeling. Arguments on the subject generally end in 
chaff, with a few good-humored allusions to Bunker Hill and the terrible 
"licking" the Britishers got in the Revolutionary war; but we never yet 
heard an American frankly confess that he or any of his countrymen en- 
tertained any earnest ill-will toward the mother country. As it has 
lately become certain, however, that such a confession might be made 
with perfect truth, this reticence is discreditable, because no man should 
be ashamed of his enmity, unless he knows that it does him dishonor. 
Every man has a right to his own opinion, and no blame attaches to an 
American for his dislike of or hostility to England, provided he either 
keeps his feelings hidden or openly avows them. It is the denial of such 
sentiments, accompanied by a covert expression of them, that we would 
reprobate as unworthy of a great and otherwise magnanimous nation. 

Although the animus we speak of is almost universal among individu- 
als, it is more convenient to demonstrate its existence by referring to the 
newspapers, which are supposed to be, and are to a certain extent, the 
vehicles of public opinion. While reading their telegraphic news of the 
war during its earlier stages, one might have fancied ones-self in St. Pe- 
tersburg. Every Russian victory, whether doubtful or not, demanded 
the largest type for its heading and the most confident assurance in its 
wording; but the triumphs of the Turkish arms, if recorded at all, were 
disposed of in an out-of-the-way word or two, accompanied by an invaria- 
ble hint that the dispatch was probably bogus. The same was the case 
with the leading articles, which were conspicuous for their exultation 
when the Emperor's star was in the ascendant, and conspicuous by their 
absence when the Crescent loomed above the Cross. What has this to do 
with England, do you say ? It has everything to do with England. It 
is sheer nonsense to urge that American sympathy is enlisted with the 
Christian against the Mahommedan. The average American is too prac- 
tical to mix religion with war, too keen to be imposed upon by Russia's 
" holy mission," too chivalrous not to secretly admire the valor 
displayed by the Turk in the face of overwhelming odds. 
No ; it was because Russia was England's ancient enemy, and Turkey 
England's ancient friend, that the American press cheered the despotic 
Czar and hooted the constitutional Sultan, But at the present stage of 
the war it is no longer necessary to draw inferences. England U now di- 
rectly interested ; she may at any moment become one of the belligerents. 
The American people, having made up their minds as to what the British 
Lion ought to do iinder the circumstances, are greatly disturbed because 
that venerable animal prefers to follow his own counsel and be the keeper of 
his own honor. They have put words into John Bull's mouth which he never 
uttered, and are now vociferously declaring that his bellow is more dan- 
gerous than his horns. No opportunity is lost to make England appear 
small in the eyes of the world. Her policy is hesitating, selfish, cowardly; 
she is effete, bloated, played out ; her influence has departed, her voice is 
no longer heeded in the councils of Europe. Such is the tone taken by 
our papers all over the country, and the reader finds it hard to determine 
whether Jonathan wishes England to go to war so that he may 
reap some pecuniary benefit from her misfortune, or wishes her to keep 
the peace, so that he may be able to say she has "backed out." 
It is needless to point to inore evidences of the existence of this hostile 
feeling; but the question remains, why does it exist? Even the most 
rabid Anglophobe will not point to the troubles of a century ago. If the 
sympathy which England is supposed to have extended toward the South 
in the recent civil war has anything to do with it, why should we not 
"acknowledge the corn," and not hide our enmity under a cloak of inu- 
endo and covert sneers? Has our pride been hurt because England does 
not reply to our constant snarling at her institutions ? Are we afflicted 
because the effete Monarchy we despise, and whose downfall we are so 
fond of predicting, stands the test of a thousand years better than our 
glorious Republic stands the test of a hundred? Are England's superior 
culture, commerce, wealth, and honesty, thorns in our side ? Nobody 
seems to know, or at least nobody cares to tell. But jealously, surely, 
must be at the root of an animosity so baseless and sneaking, and the 
sooner Jonathan learns to act like a gentleman in the matter, the better 
it will be for his self-respect at home and his reputation abroad. 

CHINESE CLEANLINESS. 
It is often a matter of astonishment that the Chinese appear to suffer 
so little from the close and unwholesome atmosphere of their sleeping 
dens. It is perfectly certain that whites would suffer more. We believe 
that the Chinaman owes this immunity to his temperate habits, his frugal 
fare, his use of tea, and must of all, to the perfect action of his skin. 
The Chinese are scrupulously particular as to the cleanliness of what they 
eat. They refuse broken victuals, and will not use a dirty plate or spoon. 
Rich food and stimulating drinks involve" the necessity for a large supply 
of oxygen. The air soon becomes vitiated by the poisonous products of 
respiration. But the simple fare of the Chinaman requires less oxygen 
for its combustion, and the products of respiration are more simple and 
less poisonous. But the health of the Chinese is chieHy saved by the 
perfect condition of his skin. The products of tissue change are elimi- 
nated by the skin in a condensed form, and, although highly offensive to 
the smell, they do not render the air poisonous like exhalations from the 
lungs. Unlike the majority of whites, the Chinese wash regularly from 
head to foot. We have seen a hundred Chinese emerge wet and dirty 
from a drift mine, accompanied by a score of whites. The latter contented 
themselves with using soap and water to the hands and faces. The for- 
mer washed all over in cold water, with a foot of snow upon the ground. 
But it is in the morgue that the vast difference between the skin of Mon- 
golians and whites is best observed. That of the Chinese is smooth, soft, 
and clean ; there is no accumulation of epidermis to obstruct the pores. 
The head is shaven, and the feet are as clean as any other part of the 
person. The skin of the white suicide is rarely in a healthy state. It is 
harsh and rough from accumulated epidermis ; and the feet present uu 
mistakable evidence of the neglect of soap and water. The Chinese are 
close shaven, and universally free from para-sites, while you have only to 
look closely to see the crowd departing from the nnkempt budyof the 
whites, like rats from a sinking ship. Lastly, the habitual use of tea 
diminishes the metamorphosis of tissue, lessens the consumption of oxygen 
anil promotes the expira ion of effete products by the skin. Thus it is 
that the Chinaman escapes the danger of foul air, an 1 hns in parted to his 
clothes a poison, having foritsworstqualityapeculiaranddisgustingstench. 



"FOR FAIR 

State was thirsty, hill and plain, 
Pious parsons prayed for rain; 
But, lest any should impeach 
Saving faith — the which they preach. 
Waited very patiently 
Till the clouds were in the sky. 
When the mercury was down 
In the tubes all over town; 
When the smart umbrella stores 
Placed their wares before their doors 
When the wind was sou-sou west, 
Pai-sons prayed their level best. 
Even as they breathed the word, 
Simple prayer of faith was heard. 
Ere from knees they rose again, 
Patter, patter, came the rain. 
Parson makes a modest bow — 
"Where is old Elijah now?" 
But, alas! the question still 
Rests unsettled — ever will. 
For each yjreacher in the town 
Breathed a prayer to bring rain down, 



WEATHER. ' 
Now, if Heaven would indicate 
Which religion saved the State! 
Romans have not got the least 
Doubt but they should thank the 

priest. 
The Episcopalians think 
Their God treated earth to drink. 
Baptist, Methodist, and Jew 
Calmly claim the honor too. 
In this fix, 'twill be confessed, 
We must have some proper test. 
Since we've had sufficient rain, 
Let the parsons pray again. 
Pray in shifts — one creed a day — 
For the rain to go away. 
In this way it will appear 
Which one Heaven wants to hear. 
When the clouds and rain have 



We'll find out which one prayed last; 
Join his flock, and walk with them 
To the New Jerusalem. 



ST. VALENTINE'S DAY. 
The letter carriers have had a busy time this week, and still their 
work is not over. It looks as if St. Valentine will come to claim a whole 
month as his own. More than sixteen centuries ago he was a jolly priest, 
who delighted in tying the knot matrimonial. His disposition was so be- 
nevolent, and his amiability so widely known, that his memory was en- 
deared to succeeding generations. For many long years the maidens 
chosen at the feast of the Lupercalla at Rome were called by the young 
men who chose them their "Valentines," in honor of the amiable Saint. 
The church subsequently frowned down the practice, and it remained for 
the British Isles to perpetuate a custom that has become so dear to all 
that are young, and to. many who are not. We read of the early English 
practice that when the maids and bachelors had assembled together, each 
one wrote on a slip of paper the name of another person of the opposite 
sex. "The men's names were put into one box, the girls' names into an- 
other, and each then drew a name from the proper box, and called the 
person whose name was thus drawn his or her valentine. Then the men 
gave balls and treats to their valentines, wearing the billets by which they 
had acquired them on their breast or sleeve. The temporary partnership 
thus begun in sport frequently became at once permanent and serious. 
When, after the reign of the Puritans, Charles II. returned to the throne 
of England, the custom of choosing valentines was not confined to bache- 
lors and maids, nor to persons of low degree, for the garrulous Pepys tells 
us that Miss Stuart, afterwards Duchess of Richmond, drew the Duke of 
York, afterwards James II., for her valentine, and was presented by him 
with a jewel worth £S00 ; and the same fortunate young lady, on another 
occasion, drew Lord Mandeville, and received from him a ring worth 
£300. 

It was long generally believed that St. Valentine's Day was the day on 
which the marriages of birds were made. Drayton says : 
Each little bird this tide 
Doth choose her loved peer. 
And Donne wrote at the time of the marriage of Princess Elizabeth 
with the Count Palatine on Valentine's day, lGb'4, a marriage from which 
Queen Victoria is descended: 

And all the chirping choristers, 

And other birds, are thy parishoners; 

Thou marryest every year 

Tile lyric lark and the grey whispering dove, 

The sparrow that neglects his life (or love. 

The missives which lovers in olden days sent to one another, and which 
were filled with complimentary imagery and fervent love-breathing, came 
to be called valentines, and from these ornate and flattering 1 descriptions 
of maidens as they appeared in their lovers' eyes, came the lace-adorned 
pictures of Cupid and the grotesque caricatures which now make life a 
burden to every letter-carrier on the 14th of February. It was once the 
fashion fur noblemen to excel in valentinian poesy, and one of the most 
distinguished writers of valentines was Charles Duke of Orleans, who, by 
the way, used his sword with less effect than his pen, for he was taken 
prisoner at Agincourt by young King Henry of England, who wa.s him- 
self an expert in the affaire of Cupid and St. Valentine. Of late years 
valentines have fallen very much beneath their former level. They have 
not been tender and amatory, poetical and courteous; the people who 
have written them have not been French Dukes, nor have their recipients 
been in the main "ladies of high degree." Instead of the high-flown 
compliment and its answering couplet, we have had such sentiments as 
these, from the maid to the bachelor: 

In vain great oaf your boots you shine, 

Just bet you ain't my Valentine. 
And from the swain to his mistress : 

Your charms no longer 1*11 embrace, 

I hate your speckled, turnip face. 
The Duke of Orleans and his lady-love never exchanged such valentines 
as these. But during the last three years a revolution has been made in 
valentines, and now the most beautiful designs in flowers and silver paper 
are worked up to decorate articles of permanent use in my lady's chamber. 
It would be impossible now to enumerate the articles which valentines of 
this year comprise. Would our readers be surprised to hear that pairs of 

handsome silk "g s, with the appropriate motto, desiring evil to him 

who thinks evil, are among the elegantly designed and numberless articles 
coming frum the world-famed manufactories of London ? The present of 
a pair of garters in a valentine must, of course, mean that the bachelor 
believes his lady dove to be a maiden of good understanding. But the la- 
dies who are loved, in the eyes of him who loves, always have that. . 



The Sail Francisco Stock Board will henceforth call a list of 
county bonds and local miscellaneous securities, formerly called in the 
Board. We are glad that this custom is to be revived. 

For " Lies of the Day,'''' see Thirteenth Page. 




VOLUME 28. 



Office— GO? to GIG Merchant Street. 
SAN FRANCISCO, FEB. 16, 1878. 



NUMBER 4. 



Biz. 



The weather continues too stormy and disagreeable tor out door 
is at a low ebb: trade languishes for the 

it i$ comforting to know that the future of the Pacific dope 
seem.* t tired by a rainfall of upwards of twenty inches — quite 

at to insure us bountiful crops and lucrative placer mining to all 
who are disjMwed to flee the city sad go iuto the country to work. Cur 
merchants are now so well convinced of harvesting good cereal crops that 
they bare begun to charter ships, to arrive, for July loading, at £3 for 
British iron vessels. A few engagements at this rate have already been 
It .1. Shipowners are, however, more than ever particular as to 
wh"m they charter their vessels, not being inclined to be again caught 
with a second installment of E. E. Morgan & Sons. We note a recent 
advance in Freights, by r;'.il overland, on all baled Cotton Goods, say 
from 3 t-» 6c. \J tt>. This affects the price of all domestics of tills nature, 
causing a material advance in market values of Dry Goods coming from 
New England cotton mills. This advance is equal to l@2c. 1? yard. 

The bag speculation is continued, looking to an immense grain crop 
the coming harvest. Since January 1st not less than 7,500,000 Grain 
Sacks (Burlap standard, 22x36) have changed hands; opening price, $h@ 
9Jc, then up to 10<a I0*c, for May and June delivery, and at this date 
holders are asking 10»5j lie. for June and July delivery. There is a firm 
tone to the market, although it is well known that large orders for Bags 
have been sent to Calcutta and Dundee, notwithstanding the large spot 
stock. 

Coffee. —A few thousand bags of Central American Green have been 
ad' led to our stocks since last reference, and looking to St. Louis and 
Chicago for a market, holders are firm in exacting 19@19Ac. for same. 

Cordage.— The factory prices have been advanced Jc. $ lb. during the 
week, now l'.i\(<i 14c, for Manila laid. 

Case Goods. —There is but little demand, at present, for Canned 
Goods of any description. Oregon Salmon seem to be entirely neglected, 
even fur the best standard brands, which cannot now be quoted better 
than si 40(5 1 45 fc? doz for 1-Ib. cans. No contracts have yet been en- 
tered into tor Salmon of the catch of 1878, and so far as we are informed, 
the snap of this important trade seems to have vanished into thin air. last 
years output being so unprofitable that many persons fear to touch it. 

Sulphur.— We note the arrival of 1,000 bbls. and 255 cs. Sicily Sul- 
phur, also a cargo from Hakodadi, Japan, say 4,200 bags. This latter 
comes direct to the Chemical Works of Judson & Shephard. In addi- 
tion to imports as above, we are constantly receiving supplies of Native 
Sulphur from Nevada, and also from the Sulphur Bank mine in our own 
State; price, $40 ton. 

Coal. --We have now to note the sale of two cargoes of Wallsend, one 
at $7 f the other at §7 50. The market for Australian at the close is dull 
•within the above range. The late heavy storms have checked expected 
arrivals from the north coast mines, causing a temporary scarcity of these 
descriptions. We quote cargoes, to arrive, at §5 50(5(G 50; West Hart- 
ley, |8@8 50. 

French Goods. — We have had two arrivals this week, one from Bor- 
deaux, the other from Marseilles. These are well assorted cargoes, con- 
sisting of Oils, Wine, Soap, etc. We note sales of some 1,700 cs. Olive 
Oils, ex-ship, upon private terms. It is asserted by commercial circulars 
that we have seen that the Olive crop the past season in France scarcely 
reached one-fifth of an average yield ; consequently an important rise in 
values is confidently expected. 

Orchilla, Ores, Etc.— The steamship Newbern, from the Colorado 
river and Mexican coast ports, is to hand with 1,330 bales Orchilla in 
transit for the Liverpool market. The steamship South Carolina carried 
via Panama, en route to New York, 205,000 lbs. Base Bullion, 120,000 lbs. 
Pig Lead, and 89,812 lbs. Silver Ore, etc. 

Quicksilver— Our exports of this article since January aggregate 3,497 
flasks, valued at 8118,388. Totals same period last year, 5,017 flasks, 
valued at §191,149. This deficiency is very easily accounted for by the 
bad roads in the country, rendering teaming from the mines almost im- 
possible, thus reducing our available market supply. The market at date 
is rather sluggish at 43@44c. 

Rice --The stock is liberal, trade quite languid, and prices nominal — 
say 5f,(o 64c. 

Sugar— The German bark Melusine, with her cargo of 4G.500 bags 
Manila, was a perfect Godsend to the California Refinery, enabling them 
to keep running. The Bay Refinery has a like cargo fully due, which, on 
its appearance, will enable it to resume work. The present price of Cube 
and Crushed is lljc.; Yellow Coffees, 9.\c; Hawaiian, GA(S;9£c. 



Teas.—On Tuesday next, S. L. Jones & Co, will hold an Important 
offering: a Trade sale, consisting of 3,000 pkgs. Black and Green Teas, of 
the well-known Castle brand (trade mark), of Castle Brothers' importa- 
tion. The offering consists of a line of choice chops, both in bulk and 
paper, well worthy the attention of the trade. 

Freights. — The week's business in charters has been light, by reason of 
an unavailable Wheat supply ; even the 15 vessels now on the Liverpool 
berth make slow dispatch in loading. The engagements of the week em- 
brace ship Harvester, 1,494 tons Wheat to Liverpool, £2 lis. Gd.;to Cork, 
U. K., £2 lGs. Gd. Charters for next summer: ships to arrive are wanted 
at 57s Gd.@G0s.— a few engagements having already been concluded 
within this range. 

"WTieat. — The deliveries in Febrnary have been light, by reason of 
stormy weather. Millers are buyers of choice lots at $2.05@§2.07^, while 
shippers take all desirable lots offered at SI. 95 per ctl. 

Barley touched bottom during the week, common feed lots having 
been sold at 51.20@1.25 per ctl., but rallying a little at the close. A sale 
of 7,000 sks. choice Bay Brewing may be noted at SI. 45, taken by a 
brewer ; 300 sks. Coast Chevalier sold at S1.50 per ctl. 

Oats. — By reason of heavy arrivals from Oregon, prices have fallen to 
§1.45@1.65perctl. 

Com. — The receipts are free, sales of Yellow at $1.45@1.55 per ctl., 
with a Mexican demand. 

Rye. — The market is weak at S1.25@1.35 per ctl. 

Hay. — Supplies are liberal. The cargo price is Sll@18.50 per ton. 

Bran and Middlings.— We quote the former at 822.50@25 ; the 
latter, $25@27.50 per ton. 

Hides. — The market for Dry is quiet at 15c ; Wet, Salted, 7A(£8c. 

Tallow. — The South Carolina, for Central America, carried 10,175 
lbs. ; sales 20,000 lbs. for export private. We quote the market G£@7c ; 
Refined, 9c. 

WooL —The stock is very meagre ; sales 22,000 lbs. Oregon at 2Gc, 
35,000 lbs. California with the range of 12@20c. 

Potatoes. — The supply is free, and the market rate $1 25@82 50 1$ ctl. 

Hops. — We uote a sale of 175 bales Mendocino at 7c; choice lots are 
scarce at 8@10c. 

Butter, Cheese and Eggs.— We quote Fresh Roll Butter at 2S@30c ; 
Cheese, 18@20c ; Eggs, 30@32|. 

Apples and Oranges.— Choice Oregon Apples may be quoted at $1 50 
@S2 per box ; Los Angeles Oranges, $12 50@S30 per M, according to size 
and quality. 

FINANCIAL. 
The week closes with arecord of but a light business in financial 
affairs — although this city has been rebursing a large portion of the money 
received for taxes. Yet the demand on the Savings Banks has thrown 
several loans on the street, which ordinarily would have gone into that 
channel, and we report an increased demand for money, with a scarcity 
of prime collaterals. Call Loans, with ten days notice, have been made 
at from 7 per cent, to 9 per cent, per annum, according to the nature of 
the collaterals. First-class commercial paper, having GO days to run, has 
been discounted at 10 per cent., whilst the banks show increased caution, 
and the course they adopt at the moment is one that tends to retard en- 
terprise rather than encourage it. In Local Securities there i< do change. 
There is a retail demand for Gas Stock at 93(ft>93J, ex dividend; Water 
Stock, 91@91|, ex dividend; Bank of California, 90^91. There are no 
first-class City or County Bonds for sale. Some Dupont-street Bonds, 
returned from the East, are offered at 89i, whilst 10G has been paid for 
small lots of San Francisco City 6-per-cent. Bonds, and 110 would be 
freely paid for the Oakland 8-per-cent. Bonds. 



Latest from the Merchant's Exchange.— New York. Feb. 15th, 
1878.— Gold opened at 102^ ; 11 a.m.. at 102g ; 3 p.m. at 102$. United 
States Bonds — Five-twenties of 1867, 105* j 1881, 104, Sterling Ex- 
change, 4 S2.V(5!4 85, short. Pacific Mail, 225. Wheat, SI 35(5 £1 13, dull. 
Western Union, 75. Hides, 19@19±. Oil— Sperm, SI 01(3 $1 03. Win- 
ter Bleached, 1 23@1 28. Wool— Spring, fine, 20(5 30 ; Burry. U@15 j 
Pulled, 39@40. Fall Clips, 16@22 ; Burry, 14@23, London, Feb. 
Liverpool Wheat Market, 12s. 2d.@12s. Gd. Club, 12s. Gd.tf 12s. lid. 
United States Bonds, 104i@102|. Consols, 95f ; 1 p.m., 95 



Arrangements are being speedily completed for a Tele] 

in this city. Further ideas in aid in our next. 



■ 



POSTSCRIPT TO THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Feb 16, 1878. 



DOCTORS FEES. 

The leading English journals have been occupied of late with a dis- 
cussion on the extravagance of doctors fees. The doctors appear to have 
had the worst of it. In reply to the charge of extortion, of which some 
instances were given, they fell back on tbt urgenoy and value of their ser- 
vices and the high honor of the profession as a class. But they utterly 
failed to establish any general principle whereby their accounts were 
made. We believe that the question of medical remuneration needs ven- 
tilation in San Francisco quite as much as in London; the relations be* 
tween doctors and patients being extremely unsatisfactory. We hear 
numerous complaints of the meanness of patients and of the exorbitance 
of doctors bills, Not unfrequently large claims are disputed in the Courts, 
ind settled without satisfaction to either party. Moi'e frequently they 
are arranged privately, large deductions being made. This practice pro- 
motes the system of overcharge, for if the doctor suspects that exception 
will be taken to his account, however moderate, he is not unlikely to an- 
ticipate the difficulty by over charge. On the part of the doctors it must 
be observed 1 hat the public generally fail to estimate medical services at 
their proper valite. This is due to the fact that there are bo many quacks 
and pretenders in this eity, whose services are even worse than valueless. 
The public have, in fast, great difficulty in distinguishing the difference 
between right and wrong treatment, and are often wilfully blind. The 
Ition Who is fool enough to pay a Chinese doctor S50 a visit ie Hot likely 
to put a proper valuo upon the services of an educated and experienced 
physician; and whilst the healer and astrologer are preferred to the 
scientific pathologist, the latter can scarcely hope that his services will 
be properly appreciated; nor, perhaps, has the medical profession yet at- 
tained in America the high standard* of older European countries. During 
the war of the Rebellion, there arose a sudden and urgent need for an 
army of doctors. Any one who could mix a poultice or dress a wound was 
made welcome to the ranks. Nearly all such persons have since practiced, 
with or without licences, and certainly without a fit and proper education. 
Moreover, there has been a large demand for cheap doctors in sparsely 
populated districts, isolated mining camps, and on the mercantile marine. 
To meet this demand the period of study has been shortened; thete&ch;rs 
have been permitted to license their own pupils; diplomas have been 
much too readily accorded, and the standard of professional service being 
thus lowered; the public refuse to pay for the inferior article supplied. 
To this low estimate of professional service there are happily many ex- 
ceptions. Skill and experience tell surely in the long run, and it is 
always gratifying to note the generosity of some grateful millionaire, 
because we know how well it is deserved. Fur, whilst a lawyer may ask 
and obtain some fifty or a hundred thousand dollars for the conduct of a 
law suit, and perhaps the gain of an estate* we seldom hear of a doctor 
getting the like for conducting a patient through his illness, with the pos- 
sible saving of his life» 

Following on the low public estimate of professional services comes the 
idea that the doctor should be engaged by the month or year, exactly 
like the cook. This arrangement is very properly denounced by the 
ethics of the profession, but is nevertheless practiced by some doctors 
with high pretensions. It is obvious that it reduces the doctor to the do- 
mestic level, and puts his services on the same footing. The master sends 
for the medical servant on the slightest occasion, just as he orders his 
domestic to clean his boots, and with the same right. But this, surely, is 
not the proper basis for professional service or professional remuneration. 
But this unwilblngness to pay for medical services has led to a worse 
practices, on the part of the physician, viz: to secretly defraud his patient 
by collusion with the druggist. The wily doctor pretends that he has 
his patient's interest at heart. He tells him that his prescription will be 
best compounded at a certain store, where only pure drugs can be ob- 
tained. But he conceals from his credulous victim that the druggist has 
engaged to pay a commission of 20, 30, 50, and even 60 per cent, on the 
charge for the medicine prescribed. Not long ago, a physician assigned 
this commission for the support of a relative, who brought an action for 
its recovery. In plain terms, this is downright robbery. It is obtaining 
money under false pretenses, a conspiracy with the druggist to defraud 
the patient. And, as the chemist is bound to get his profit, he naturally 
adds the commission to the price of the prescription, or, if he is as un- 
scrupulous as the physician, he curtails the quantity of any valuable in- 
gredient prescribed. We are pained to know that there are eminent 
physicians in this city who resort to this shameful and, we believe, crimi- 
nal expedient to increase their fees. And our indignation boils over when 
we hear of frauds pretending to give gratuitous advice to the poor and 
needy, knowing all the time that the y take their fee in the apothecary's 
store hard by. If there be nothing else, we beg that there may be com- 
mon honesty practiced between physicians and their patients. Some of 
the doctors we could name have certainly a reputation which should 
enable them to collect their fees without the assistance of the chemist, 
and the ill example they present to their younger and more needy breth- 
ren lowers the dignity of the entire profession, and diminishes public re- 
spect for their high calling. No wonder the public object to pay for 
medical advice, when they find that the doctor is interested in dosing 
them with drugs, and when drug bills are apparently large enough to in- 
clude advice. 

LONDON STOCK EXCHANGE. 
A jobber was desired by a broker to buy £600 of St. Fu Stock. He 
bought it at 66, and then sold it to the broker for 70. Messrs. Martin, 
the bankers, for whom the transaction took place, very naturally objected 
to this difference of price. The jobber was brought before the Committee 
of the Stock Exchange, and has been suspended for six months. This is 
right and proper, but the Stock Exchange must do something more than 
deal heavily with individual members, if it wishes to stand well with the 
public. Its rules and regulations must not only be inforced, but they 
must be amended. Sham dealings must be rendered impossible. Deal- 
ings before allotment in Stocks and Shares must be forbidden. Brokers 
must not be allowed to pocket " contangoes " secretly, which are paid to 
them, as agents of clients. The Stock Exchange ought to appoint a Com- 
mittee to revise its rules, and it should invite a representative of the 
Board of Trade to sit on this Committee, with a consultative voice. 

—Truth. 



SISNAl 


SESYICE METEOROLOGICAL EEPOKT, 


WEEK 


ENDING KB 
Big 


B. 14, 1878, SAN EEANCI 


SCO, CAL. 


hest and Lotoest Barometc 


Fri. 8. 


Sat. 9. 


San. 10 


Mon. 11 


Tue. 12 

30.04 


Wed 13 

30.01 


Thrl4 


30.13 


30.21 


30.17 


29.99 


29.99 


30.04 


30.14 


30.09 


29.81 


29.75 


29.58 


29.82 




Maximum and Minimum Thermometer. 




6? 


55 


57 i 61 | 57 
49 51 JO 


57 | 


55 


49 


43 


50 


50 






Mean Daily Humidity . 






73 


77 | 


81 | 73 | 69 | 
Prevailing Wind. 


69 | 


SO 


W. 


N. 


SE. | S. | SE. | 
Wind— Miles Traveled. 


W. | 


BE. 


162 


109 


44 | 163 | 264 | 
State of Weather. 


410 | 


322 


Cloudy. 


Clear. 


Cloudy. | Rainy. | Fair. | 


Fair. | 


Rainy. 




Rainfall in Tiventy-four Hours 


, 




.14 


1 


.02 | 1.7S | .17 | 


.01 | 


1.92 


Total ltd 


In During Season beginning July X, J£77..23.45 inches. 



SANITARY NOTES. 
One hundred and five deaths occurred this week, as compared with 
last. There were 68 males, and only 37 females. There were 7 Chinese. 
Thirty-nine were under 5 years of age, 54 between 20 and 60, and only 6 
over 60 years. It is clear that the principal mortality is of persons in 
the prime of life, and chiefly males. The mortality this week is unduly 
increased by 8 suicides, making 11 this month. There was also one hom- 
icide, and one accidental death. Measles are extremely prevalent, and 
are very fatal. The zymotic deaths were 5 measles, 5 diphtheria, 4 
typhoid fever, 2 scarlatina, 1 whooping -cough. Only 1 person died of 
old age. Among the deaths from the respiration, are 3 croup, 2 bronchi- 
tis, pneumonia and congestion 7, consumptson 13. No small-pox has been 
reported this week. Catarrh and Bore throats prevail, caused, undoubt- 
edly, by exposure to damp air and wet feet. 

COUNTERFEIT MONEY. 

In view of the fact that of the immence circulation of United States 
Greenbacks and National Currency, some idea of which the reader can 
form by calling to mind the several issues, viz: in 1861, fifty millions 
($50,003,000) <>f Legal Tenders; in 1862 to 18G6, three hundred and twenty 
millions (8320,000,000); ditto in 1869, the same amount (new issue); and 
in 1863 to 1878, some four hundred and seventy millions ($470, 000,000) of 
U. S. Treasury officials that the estimated amount of Counterfeit money 
National Currency, it can scarcely excite surprise when we learn fr mi 
afloat exceeds forty millions (§40,000,000) of dollars, nor that the Govern- 
ment should endeavor to protect its citizens against handling this spurious 
money by every legitimate manner. One method adopted has been to 
authorize, by Act of Congress, the issuance directly from the machinery 
of the Treasury Department of all genuine plates, from the one dollar up 
to the thousand, with authority to properly appoint and instruct agents 
to make same known to such of our citizens as may wish to avail them- 
selves of it. Our fellow townsman, Mr. Louis A. Wei ton, has been ap- 
pointed sole agent for California, and proposes to enter immediately upon 
his duties. We will refer to this more fully in our next issue. 



The brokers, anticipating the passage of the Tuttle bill, are looking 
around for something which shall replace the cheerful and sustaining one 
per cent. Destiny seems to point to a second-hand clothes shop as a field 
befitting the dresser. Wattles has been observed to halt before a window 
where the bones and tambourine invited him to a place on the end. 
Harry Logan thinks of organizing a claque, of which he shall be chief. 
The only drawback to this plan is the circumstance of his never having 
applauded anything in his life. The man with the eyebrows has cast an- 
ticipatory eyes on a pulu factory, reckoning on those facial ornamenta- 
tions for his stock in trade. Van decides on a standing engagement in 
the poet's corner. Noble may take a contract for the colonizing of re- 
mote districts. Great inducements will be held out to Buffalo Ned by 
the Captain Jack combination. Ives will enter upon the work of expung- 
ing doubtful passages from Shakespeare and the Bible, to make them fit 
reading for the young. Extraordinary success will attend the presiding 
officer if he buy a new suit of petticoats and try a tent season as the 
"Mammoth Circassian Beauty weight, 1 Ton." In short, the brokers have 
many schemes, but what is to become of the Legislature if the brokers 
refuse the sop that has been counted on as the Plum of the season. They 
will swoop down in a body and clean out the free lunch counters in all 
the churches. It is a necessity with a legislator to clean out something. 

San Franciscans Abroad. —Paris: H. Epstein, Mrs. H. Epstein, 
Mrs. Green, the Misses Green, J. T. M. Kelly, Alex. Moody and family. 
London: H. F. Holmes, Mrs. Holmes, G. Muger. Nice: Atkins Mas- 
sey, Mrs. A. Massey, G. L. Massey. Geneva: F. Dilling, Mrs. Tum- 
mins and family. Rome: Mrs. A. Bartlett, Miss A. Bartlett, A. Hath- 
way. Florence: Dr. O. O. Burgess. Naples: Mrs. Chamberlain, Miss 
E. Chamberlain, Master O. F. Chamberlain, Miss M. Chamberlain. David 
and Mrs. Farquharson, Miss. M. A. Farquharson, Davy Farquharson, 
Miss Farrill. Sorrento: General F. Tramontano. Prague: J. B. Tif- 
fany. — American Register, Jan. 19, 1878. 

It is the province of science to preserve the failing powers of man- 
kind when years begin to tell their story. Failing eyesight is one of the 
first intimations we have that we are growing old. But Muller's famous 
Brazilian spectacles make old eyes as good as young. 

Young Men's Hebrew Association — Season 1S78. — Lecture by 
Henry George, Esq. — subject, "Moses" — at Red Men's Hall (Post street, 
between Stockton and Powell), Wednesday, February 20, 1878, at 8 
o'clock p. M. 



POS 



IT* To THE 8AM FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



3 



Condensed Nows of the Week. 



mm IX. 

PataTll i:v ll'.h l ■ ' .. a f*l*c rumor w,v i U 

' Mr. » I'Hrii-n 



; • *rb against I 

Tuesday. 12th it for the de- 

■ 
■oft naponsible for the negligence of i'..- ■■ - 1 1 i era. 
Wedn'adoy. 13th. A. W. Koysden, lal rney of 

l iurt, has I «■ 
— nor Irwin baa nominated Charles Le Gay an Honor 

ary i ! posil ion. 

Thursday. 14th lit Committee of the Board <<f Sapor- 

rday, and bud hpfore it E. .T. Baldwin, who is 
i" -r a c»«« fiastCOtse. Mr. Baldwin was examined in 

! Application, but the Committee did not decide n|>on 

renior, baa offered a reward for tin- nuir- 

old man killed in this city on the morning of 

1 is offered for the tir>t attest 

ami c mvictinn, and ^^*0 for each subsequent one. 

Friday, 15th.- v iforaia-atreel Win? Railroad gets fairly 

car will leave rillmore street at (i a. m., and 

K my street at 11:50 v. M.— — The Governor has 

PI -in*!* Employment Bill, authorizing an appropriation of 

Park and other improvements. 

TELEGRAPHIC. 

Monday, Feb. 11th. — New Vom, Feb, 11th.- John A. Stokes, of 

Ivauia, Grand Sire, having decline! the Australian mission ten- 

him by the Odd Fellows* Grand Lodge of the United States, Deputy 

Sire John B. Barmen, of California, has been selected fcogo in his 

— Niw You, Kelt. 11th.— Terrible minors are afloat here about 

earthqnakea and tidal waves hi South America, One report says < ruay- 

aqcil haa been destroyed."— ""An immense demonstration against changes 

in the tariff in the direction of free trade was held at Pittsburg on Satur- 

<!a\\ About 15,000 persons took part in the procession and meetu 

Tuesday, 12th. —Philadelphia, Feb. 12th.— The Times (Independent 

is seating of Wi^-ington was in flagrant contempt of 

ana the facts in the case. WASHrNQTON, Feb. 12th. — The Pres- 

tas nominated Charles Silent, of California, Associate Justice of the 

Supreme Court of Arizona Territory. Haatfobd (Conn.), Feb. 11th.— 

Bon. Gideon Weils, Ex -Secretary of the Navy, died this evening from 
the effects of a carbuncle, which had confined him to the house fur about 
two ■■ eeks, 
Wednesday, 13th. — Cincinnati. Feb. 13th.— The body of Mrs. Jane 
:i. who dietl in this city, will be conveyed to Washington, Penn- 
sylvania, to be cremated by Dr. Leraoyne, in accordance with her wishes 
her written will.— —The meeting of the National Democratic 
Committee, which was to have been held on the 22d of February, has 
been postponed until the 22d of May.— New York, Feb, 13th.— Aset- 
tlement is expected in the Lord-Hicks legal proceedings, growing out of 
the recent wedding. The lawyers were in conference yesterday, and it is 
thought will complete the agreement to-day. 

Thursday, 14th. — Washington, Feb. 14th. — The Speaker laid before 
the House a communication from the Secretary of the Treasury statin*? 
that the internal revenue of the government has fallen off S4,9G9,000, 
principally on account of the agitation in regard to the tax on tobacco 
and whisky, and recommending the House to take immediate action on 
the subject. 

Friday, 15th. —New York, Feb, 15th.— A Times Cleveland special 
says : Ben Wade is worse. The fever has returned, which is considered 
a very bad symptom. ^^Advices from Chile announce the death of Don 
Augustin Edwards, a leading millionaire of Chile. His wealth is esti- 
mated at 825,000,000. John Brown, one of the wealthiest men of Valpa- 
raiso, is dead.^^WASHiNGTON, Feb. 15th. — The House Committee on 
Indian Affairs to-day heard the arguments of representatives of five civ- 
ilized Indian tribes against the bill authorizing election of Delegates to 
Congress from Indian territory. Also, against the establishment of the 
teritory of Oklahoma. 

FOREIGN. 

Monday, February 11th. — London, Feb. lltb. — A special from Ber- 
lin says : Prince Gortscbakoff has notified the Powers that since the En- 
glish Cabinet has resolved to send a fleet to Constantinople, ostensibly to 
protect Christians, Russia also contemplates occupying Constantinople 
from the land with the n ame object. —A Berlin dispatch to the Tunes 
says Russia has declared her resolve to re-annex Bessarabia, despite the 
Roumanian protest. In consequence of an urgent order received at 
Chatham Dock Yard from the Admiralty to-day, the whole force, num- 
bering 4,000 men, will begin working extra hours to complete vessels in 
Land. 

Tuesday, 12th.— Berlin, Feb. 12th.— Emperor William received the 
Presidents of the Reichstag on Sunday, and it is reported that he said : 
" The situation is indeed serious, but nevertheless we still hope that a 
maintenance of peace is possible.^— London, Feb. 12th.— 11 &.H. — At 
the opening of the Stock Exchange this morning, the quotation of consols 
was 95.J. The news of the refusal by the Porte of a firman for the 
passage of the Btraits by the fleet has caused a great sensation, though the 
excitement is less than last week.— -London, Feb. 12th. — The four iron- 
clads comprising the channel squadron were directed by telegraph topro- 
ceed immediately to Gibraltar for orders, on its becoming known that Vice 
Admiral Hornby had been refused permission to enter the Dardanelles. 

Wednesday, 13th.— London, Feb. 13th.— The Times, in its leading 
editorial article, says : However desirable a compromise may be, it can 



\ 

■ militia will 

tn waters bai 
Iron. 
Thursday. 14th.- LONDON, Feb. 13th. Tl 
i grave and n« >nsibility, and 

will quit < ' ' 
boold fulfill hi ipy it with her troops.— 

Pi b. 1 M b< \ cai o of to i rived and tn 

lag, The turret ship Devastation leaves to day, and 

for strengthening I h for Vice 

Admiral Hornby. London, Feb. L4th. B .■ : '> p.m. tn bhe Souse of 

ins, this afternoon, Northc meats already 

■ ir.iin: the passage of the Dardanelles by the fleet, 
Friday. 15th. — BftussBLB, Feb. 15th.— The Word, organ here of the 
Russian Government, publishes a letter from St. Petereburg announcing 
that Prinoe Bismarck does not wish for a Congress of the Powers, 
1 nee, it is added, will therefore be composed simply of ordinary 

Ambassadors.— St. PetbUBBUBO, Feb. loth.— There is great anxiety 
artioularly among English residents, on account of the critical situ- 
ation. The Russian national feeling is becoming excited. — Athens, 
Feb. 15th. -The Italian frigate Terrible was wrecked near S&lonica 
week. The Terrible was an ironclad of 2,900 tons. She carried si, _"■ 
ton guns. 

THE ELECTRIC LIGHT IN SAN FRANCISCO. 

The question of providing light for great cities is one which is en- 
grossing the attention of the scientific world. For a great many years 
electricity has been legarded as the future agent. The intensity of the 
electric light lias long been known. Electricians have been for years en- 
deavoring to make it available for practical use. The chief obstacle in 
the way has been the inconstancy of the light. San Francisco, as well as 
the great cities of the East and Europe, has its investigators in this 
branch of scientific study, working for the same end — the provision of a 
cheap light from this element. Three San Franciscans, residing on the 
northwest corner of Post and Devisadero streets, believe that they have 
solved the problem. These gentlemen are respectively named Lueien 
Dubernet, Leon Sirieix, and G. Barbier. The subject of electric light 
has occupied their united attention for the past eight months. Each of 
them had been conducting experiments on his own account previously. 
Sixteen years ago. Monsieur Sirieix produced a steady electric light, but 
he had not at that period discovered a way of maintaining the light for 
any great length of time. The cost of producing it was also so High at 
that time as to preclude the use of the light for ordinary illuminating 
purposes. 

The other evening a private exhibition of what has been accomplished 
by this trio of electricians was given. The chief object of the experi- 
ments was to show that a steady and permanent light bad been evolved 
from that erratic element, electricity, which was applicable as a substi- 
tute for gas for the illumination of cities. The battery employed con- 
sisted of 72 jars. A part of the discovery or invention is represented in 
the contents of the jars, the nature of which the inventors at present are 
disinclined to disclose. The jet is produced on carbon points, separated 
by a patent insulator (also the invention of the trio.) These carbon 
points are warranted to last from three to four hours. To renew them 
when necessary, they have provided an automatic feeder, in the form of a 
half section of a drum, the semi-circle being perforated so as to hold the 
carbon poiutsi The point is held horizontally by a rest while burning, 
but when it burns to its base it slips past the rest, and the semi-cylinder 
drops another carbon into its place. In this way the circuit is only mo- 
mentarily broken, and the tips of carbon points are furnished with a 
thread of platinum so as to ignite the jet. 

The jet produced is of remarkable brilliancy. Half a dozen blocks off, 
its reflected rays are stronger than those of the full moon, which it some- 
what resembles in tone, although differing from moonlight in not disturb- 
ing colors. All colors are shown true by electric light. The jet itself 
possesses all the intensity of the sun's brilliancy, and the eye is similarly 
affected by looking at it.- 

The gentlemen who have thus perfected the electric light have been 
figuring on the cost of lighting the streets of San Francisco with it. They 
claim that it can be accomplished at a cost not exceeding §120,000 per 
annum, and possibly for 8100,000. The city now pays over $300,000 a 
year. To do the work, no more than fifty lights would be needed, each 
of which would be accompanied, of course, with reflectors to direct the 
light where required. The elevated points and tallest buildings would be 
called into requisition for the purpose. 

The experiments recently given indoors and in the open air, notwith- 
standing the rain and the fact that the wires were not insulated, were 
eminently successful. A public exhibition will be given at an early day. 

Beerbohm's Telegram.— London and Liverpool, Feb. 15, 1878.— 
Floating Cargoes, good demand; Cargoes on Passage, moderate demand; 
Mark Lane Wheat, turn dearer; Liverpool Spot Wheat, good demand: 
No. 2 Spring Off Coast, 51s.; Do. for Shipment, 49s. 6d.@50s.; Red 
Winter Off Coast, 55s.; California do., 59s.@59s. 8d.; Do., Nearly Due, 
59s.; Do., Just Shipped, 54s. 6d.; Do. Club, 12s. Sd.@12s. lid.; Do. Av- 
erage, 12s. 4d.@12s. 7d.; Red Western Spring, 10s. 7d.@lls. 2d.; English 
Country Markets, generally Is. dearer ; French Country Markets, 
Blightly better; Consols, 95 5-16; Gold, 2|j Sterling Exchange, 82i@84i. 

William Alvord has been elected President of the Pacific Rolling 
Mill Company ; B. P. Brunner, Vice President and Superintendent ; L. 
B. Benchley, General Manager ; and Charles M. Keeney, Secretary. 

The uniform telegraphic rate between France and Germany is now 
four cents a word. 



POSTSCRIPT TO THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Feb. 1C, 1878. 



HI3HE3T ST0CZ QUOTATIONS FOE WEEK ENDING FEB- 15, 18T8. 
Compiled Br Hopkins & Macfarlanb, 22S Montgomery St. 



Name of Mine. 



Argenta 

Glides 

* Alpha 

*AlU 

Alps 

" Bullion 

•Belcher 

Best i Belcher. . 

jJenton 

Bodie 

Cons Imperial. .. 

Crown Point 

Ohnllar 

California 

Con. Virginia.... 

Caledonia 

Confidence 

*De Frees 

Eureka Con 

Exchequer 

•Gould & Curry . 

Gila 

Grand Prize 

*Hale & Norcross 
Julia 

* Justice 

Jackson 

Kentuck 

♦Leopard 

* Lady Wash'n . . . 

*Leviatban 

Leeds 

•Mexican 

Modoc 

Manhattan 

Northern Belle . . 

Ophir 

Overman .» 

Raymond & Ely. 

Rye Pateh 

♦Savage 

* Sierra Nevada . . 

Silver Hill 

Seg Belcher 

Solid Silver 

Succor 

Silver King-, Ar'a 
Silv. King 1 South. 

Trojan 

♦Union Con 

♦Utah 

■'Yellow Jacket.. 



Sat. 


MOSDAT. 


TUESDAT. 


Wednesdy 


TncRBD'r. 


Friday. 


M. 


A.M. 


P.M. 


A.M. 


P M 


A.M. 


P.M. 


A.M. 


P.M. 


A. 11. 


P.M. 


i 





s 


_ 


3 


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1} 


— 


1 


— 


i 


i 


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4 




6 




s 





4 


— 


101 


10 


— 


10+ 


10* 







10 





10 


10 


it 


Si 


s+ 


8} 


si 


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8S 


8S 


8* 


Si 


8ft 


4* 


— 


5 




*» 




44 








— 





« 


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3* 


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18 


ITS 


173 


176 


17J 


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43 


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27 


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211 


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221 


221 


21 


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21 


21 


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SI 


U 


81 


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84 


8 


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88 

8 

13* 


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12} 





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128 


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103 


106 


Hi 


11 


108 


11 


iui 


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— 


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} 







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11 


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51 


51 


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153 


15 





15 


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141 


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4 


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111 


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101 


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28 


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— 


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26 




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— 


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28* 


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5 


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— 


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_ s 


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lit 


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10 


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10J 


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10J 


104 


in 


10* 


— 


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10* 


10* 



Assessments are now due on the Stocks above marked thus * 
AMERICAN DISTRICT TELEGRAPH. 



CONVENIENCE. 




PROTECTION. 



February 9. 



BTJTLT AND BOX PUT IN FREE. 
Rental, $2.50 Per Month. 

JOMN I. SAJBIX, Superintendent, 
322 Snnsojiic Street. 



TEN PER CENT. FIRST MORTGAGE BONDS AT PAR. 

The Sierra Finnic and Lumber Company nave mortgaged 
their large property— principally lands — to secure the payment of 1,200 Bonds 
of $500 each, running- for one, two or three years, and bearing ten per cent, interest, 
payable semi-annually. Two hundred Bonds of either series are now offered for sale 
at par, to close this season's business. The remainder will be held for another year. 
The property cost oyer, £1,400,000, and has produced the last six months $S00,OX) 
worth of lumber, at a cost of §400,000, most of which is stacked and drying, to be in 
readiness for sale, and for which there is a good market, both at home and abroad. 
Mr. Alvinza Hayward, being the chief owner, will give a written guarantee that the 
Bonds and interest will be paid at maturity. Merchants' Exchange Bank Stock. will 
be taken in exchange, at $75 per share. For Bonds and further particulars apply to 
R. G. SNEATH, President S. F. and L. Co., 
Nov. 17. 423 California street, San Francisco. 

AGRICULTITRAL PARK, LOS ANGELES, TO LET. 

Office Southern District Agricultnral Society, Eos Angeles. 
January 25th, 1S78. —Proposals will he received for leasing- the Buildings and 
Race Track at Agricultural Park, Los Angeles, until the 15th of February, the lease 
to terminate on the 1st of November, 1S7S, or continued if satisfactory "to all con- 
cerned. The buildings are all in good repair and built within the last few years, the 
track equal to any in the State. Luxuriant shade-trees embellish the entire grounds, 
and the surrounding scenery is beautiful. To a person possessed of the requisite 
means and the experience necessary to conduct such a business, this is the finest op- 
portunity on the Pacific Coast. Address proposals to GEO. O. TIFFANY, 
Feb. 9. Secretary Southern List. Agl Soc'y, Los Angeles, Cal. 

NOTICE. 

For tbe very best photographs go to Bradley A- Kulofson's, 
in au Elevator, 429 Montgomery street. Oct. 29. 



T 



PACIFIC MAIL ST2AMSHIP COMPANY. 
he Company's steamers will sail as follows 

CHINA, March 1st, for YOKOHAMA and HONGKONG. 



GEORGIA, February 19th, for PANAMA and NEW YORK, calling at ACAPULCO, 
LA LIBERTAD, SAN JOSE DE GUATEMALA and PUNTA ARENAS. Hereafter 
the Panama Steamers will leave on the 5th and 19th of each month. Tickets to and 
from Europe by any line for sale at the lowest rates. 

AUSTRALIA, February ISth, at 12 o'clock, M., or on arrival of the English 
mails, for HONOLULU, AUCKLAND and SYDNEY. ^10 additional is chargetl tor 
passage in Upper Saloon, 

DAKOTA. February 20th. for VICTORIA, PORT TOWNSEND, SEATTLE, TA- 
Ci 'MA ar.d OLYMPIA, connecting at TAC'OMA with Northern Pacific Railroad for 
PORTLAND., Oregon. Tickets must be purchased before 11 a.m. on day of sailing, 
at 222 Montgomery street, or at Wharf Office. For freight or passage apply at the 
office, corner of First and Brannan streets. 

Feb. 16. WILLIAMS, BLANCHARD & CO.. Agents. 

SAUCELITO FERRY. 

Winter Arrangement.*— On and after November Stn, 1877, 
a swift and commodious steamer will leave as follows ; 
San Francisco, foot of Davis street : 8:45 A M., R. R.; 10:45 A.M.; *3:30p.m. ; 5:00 
p.m., R. R. Saccelito : S:00 A.M., R. R. ; 9:30 a. a. ; 1:00 p.m. ; 4:15 p.m., R. R. 

Sunday Time.-— Sah Francisco, foot of Davis street : 10:00 am., R. R.; 12:00 
M. ; 2:00 p.m. ; 4:30 p.m. Saucelito : 9:00 a.m. ; 11:00 a m. ; 1:00 P.M. ; 3:00 r.M. ; 
and 5:20 p.m., R. R. 

On MONDAY MORNING an Extra Trip from from San Francisco at 7:00 A.M. 
♦This trip at 2:00 P.M. on SATURDAY. 

LANDS for sale in lots to suit. Inquire at the office of the Company, No. 320 San- 
some street, or of MAURICE DORE & CO., No. 410 Pine street. 

Feb. 9. FRANCIS AVERY, Superintendent. 

OREGON STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

The Only Direct Mail Line to Portland, Oregon.— Regnlar 
Steamers to PORTLAND from San Francisco every FIVE DAYS until further 
notice-Steamships GEORGE W. ELDER, CITY OF CHESTER, AJAX, and STATE 
OF OREGON (now building-), connecting at Portland, Oregon, with Steamers and 
Railroads and their connecting Stage lines for all points in Oregon, Washington and 
Idaho Territories British Columbia and Alaska. This Company has the exclusive 
right of selling Through Tickets at Reduced Rates over the Oregon Central and Or- 
egon and California Railroads in Oregon, and EMIGRANTS to Oregon furnished with 
Certificates entitling them to travel at Half Rates over these roads. 

Caution.— This is the only line running NEW IRON STEAMSHIPS with every 
modern improvement for the comfort and safety of passengers. 

Nov. 3. K. VAN OTERENDORP, Agent, 210 Battery street. 

OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL STEAMSHIP COMPANY, 

171 or Japan and China, leave wharf, corner First and Brau- 
" nan streets, at noon, for YOKOHAMA AND HONGKONG, connecting at 
Yokohama with Steamers for Shanghai. 

GAELIC Thursday. Feb. 21st. 

OCEANIC Tuesday, Dec. 18th, and Saturday, March 10th. 

BELGIC Tuesday, Jan. 22d, and Tuesday, April Hi th. 

Cabin Plans on Exhibition, and Passage Tickets for sale at No. 2 New Mont- 
gomery street. For Freight, apply at the Pacific Mail Steamship Company's Wharf. 
T. H. GOODMAN, General Passenger Agent, 
GEORGE H. BRADBURY, President. Feb. 9. 

PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

Steamers of this Company will sail from Broa.Iway Wharf 
for PORTLAND, Oregon), every 5 days, direct, and for LOS ANGELES, SANTA 
BARBARA, SANTA CRUZ, SAN DIEGO, SAN LUIS OBISPO and other NORTH- 
ERN and SOUTHERN COAST PORTS, leaving SAN FRANCISCO about every 
third day. 

For Day and Hour of Sailing, see the Company's Advertisement in the San Fran- 
cisco Daily Papers. 
%W Great Reduction in Rates of Fare to Portland, Oregon. 
Ticket Offiee, No. 211 Montgomery Street, near Pine. 
GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Agents, 
Dec. 22. No. 10 Market street. 

INTERMEDIATE SfE&MiR FOR HONOLULU. 
he first>clnss Steamship " St. Paul** will perform the In- 
termediate Mail Service to HONOLULU on the following schedule : 
FROM BAN FRA-NXISCO. FROM HONOLULU. 

February 19th. I March 5th. 

For freight or passage, having superior accommodations, apply to 

WILLIAMS, BLANCHARD & CO.,' 
Feb. 2. 218 California street, or corner First and Brannan streets. 

CALIFORNIA AND MEXICAN S. S. LINE 

For Cape St. Eucas, Ea Paz, Nazatlau and Gnaymas, 
touching at MAGDALENA BAY should sufficient inducement offer. — The 
Steamship NEWBERN (Win. Metzger, Master) will leave for the above ports on 
THURSDAY, February 21st, at 12 o'clock M., from Folsom-street Wharf. Through 
Bills of Lading will be furnished and none others signed. Freight will be received 
on Friday, February 15th. No Fieightreceivedafter Wednesday, February 20th, 12 m., 
and Bills of Lading must be accompanied by Custom House and Consular Clearances. 
For freight or passage, apply to J. BERMINGHAM, Agent, 

Feb. 13. No. 10 Market street. 



T 



NOTICE TO ALL PATRONS OF THE OREGON STEAMSHIP CO. 

Having discontinued onr advertisements in iiio ■* v tjide," 1 
for all future movements of the Steamships of this Company, see Daily Papers 
and Posters. The " Guide " notices of Departures and Arrivals of our Steamers are 
without authority. [Feb. 16 ] K. VAN OTERENDORP. Agent. 

TO OWNERS OF REAL ESTATE. 

Persons owning Keal Estate that has heretofore been as- 
sessed in the former owner's name are requested to appear personally, or send 
their Deeds to the Assessor's Office, S. E. corner Kearny and Washington streets 
(Old Hall of Records), immediately, and have the proper changes made for next 
year's Roll. The work on the Real Estate Roll for 1873 will commence in a few davs, 
after which it will be too late for any changes. ALEXANDER BADLAM, 

Feb. 9. Cit y and County Assessor. 

THE PAINTING, "A SEMINARY ALARMED," "~ 

By Toby E. Rosenthal, is now on view at our Gallery— Ad- 
mission, 25 eents. The Painting has been photographed by W ATKINS, and 
copies are for sale by Amos Currier, Lippi Bros., Sanborn, Vail & Co., and at the Gal- 
lery. All photographs which do not bear the imprint of either W ATKINS or the 
BE'RLIN PHOTOGRAPH COMPANY are but copies of other Photographs, and not 
I from the original. [Feb. 9.] SNOW «fc MAY. 



The Special Organ of " Marriott's Aeroplane Navigation Co."— Fred. Marriott, Patentee. 

Prio* jxt Copjr. XO CmiU 



ESTABLISHED JULY. 20. ISM. 



I Annnnl Snb«oriptlon, tft. 



gtfl F^ATL3xg S(J!) 




DEVOTED TO THE LEADING INTERESTS OF CALIFORNIA AND THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Vol. 28 



8AN FRAN0IS00, SATUBDAY, FEB. 23, 1878. 



No. 5. 



onto or l In- s»n Franrlaro Mtwl Letter, Merchant .Street, 
Nn*. 007 to 015, San Francisco. 

f1iU.li l'.AKS— K90@91O-Silvkr Bars— CJqilo $» cent, disc. Treasury 
*" Nut.- are s*-llinir at MA Baying, 96. Mexican Dollars, 6@ — 
per cent, disc nominal. Trade Dollars, :ihOH \kt cent. 

»W Kxchanec on New York, J per cent, for Gold ; Currency, 1J@1J per 

cent, premium. On London, Hankers, 4'.l^,iLn7; ; Commercial, 

ttfd.@60d. Paris. 5 francs |ier dollar. Tcle),Tam3, 60-100(ai} per cent. 

«- Latest price of Gold at New York, Feb. 21, at 3 P.M., 102. Latest 
price of Sterling, 48S©486. 

PRICES OF LEADING STOCKS AND GOVERNMENT BONOS. 
8a» Frascisco Fchruarv 21, 1878. 



Work* and Bond*. 
O. S Honda. 5-20. 1807-68.. 
Legal Tender Notes. 
S. f. <'itv JBCo. B'da, 68, - 5S 

S. F. On) Itonds. 7s 

Sacramento City Bonds 

Yilha County Kiti.l-.-~ 

Baa HataoOo Honda, 7s. .. 
s. f. <a- LightC 

National G. B'k & Trust Co. 
Spring valley Water Co.... 



Bid 


A*K-r>d 


104 


I0S 


93 


981 


102 


lot 


105 


108 


20 


IS 


97 


— 


100 


— 


91 


92 


77i 


80 


91 


92 



St. ,-!■.. and Bond*. 


Bid. 


Asked 


Omnibus Railroad Co 


30 


33 




70 


75 


N. B. and Mission R. R. Co. 


70 


72} 


Front St., M. & 0. R. R. Co. 


22 


25 


Fireman's Fund Ins. Co 


95 


100 


Union Insurance Co 


108 


112 




110 
91 






95 


Central Pacific Railroad.... 


85 


86 



THE STOCK MARKET. 

The Stock Market shows no perceptible change during the past 
week, and the same stereotyped quotations, day after day, afford but 
little encouragement to those dealers who are accustomed to trade upon 
the daily fluctuations of the market. As a consequence, the army of 
operators is fast being thinned out, and business at the Boards is getting 
beautifully — aye, more beautifully less. At no time, within a period of 
the past five years, has business been so utterly stagnated as at present, 
and the unpromising outlook for any immediate change, exercises a most 
depressing effect upon brokers, and those directly or indirectly engaged 
in the business. The same extreme dullness exists in the more legitimate 
line of commercial pursuits ami trade generally, showing the natural 
concomitancy of the one business as identified with the other. And the 
history of the mining and stock business on this coast has always shown 
this to be the case. The "Refer in Mining bills" recently introduced, and 
now pending before the Legislature, contributes in a great measure to the 
present lethargic condition of the market, and the enforcement of a law so 
inimical to the business, and its practical workings, as now carried on at 
the Exchanges, will result at once in the disintegration of the stock 
business and a final removal to some other locality. In such an event 
the disastrous effects that would be entailed upon this coast could hardly 
be over-estimated. To the unexampled growth and prosperity of this 
coast must be ascribed the fabulous richness and productiveness of our 
mines and r bag industry, and any legislation which will inhibit the 
system now . ogue for the development of aur mines, will deal a death- 
blow to the foundation on which rests the whole superstructure of our 
material wealth and prosperity. While we are heartily in favor of any 
reform measures that will tend to correct certain abuses in the business, 
we cannot but stigmatize the present bills before the Legislature as a gross 
and bare-faced attemptat blackmail. The public may congratulate them- 
selves that the era of dishonest mine management has, to a great extent, 
passed away; and with the almost absolute directory of the Comstock in 
the hands of the Bonanza people, we may look for an upright and satis- 
factory administration of affairs. The management of the Bonanza mines 
affords the best evidence of the integrity and honest dealing of these peo- 
ple, and the attraction of Foreign and Eastern capital towards our divi- 
dend paying mines, is an attestation of a restoration of confidence in our 
mines and i te-gement. We have reason to believe that the prevailing 
stagnation t ■. le market is but a forerunner of a more active and pros- 
perous seneo-U, nd we predict that the cross-cutting in Ophir on the 1900- 
foot level will show a most important development. The south-east drift 
has yet a distance of over 100 feet to run to make a connection with the 
California winze, and which will occupy about three week's time, when 
cross-cutting will be commenced on this level. There can be no doubt 
but that a development of some kind will be made, and this will be the 
signal for a general upheaval all along the line. The Bonanzas hold firm 
at about previous quotations, and the balance of the market preserves 
about the same relative equilibrium. 



t^V^T^* Published with this week's issue a Four- 



Page Postscrijtt. 



LATEST ATOMS OF NEWS OF FACT AND THOUGHT. 



FINANCIAL. 

The heavy storm which con'i med nearlyall this week and yesterday 
being a holiday, has greatly interfered with financial operations, and 
transactions have consequently been so limited as to make our report this 
week wholly uninteresting. Money continues to be abundant, and can be 
procured at low rates on really prime mortgages or collaterals; but the 
difficulty with capitalists at the moment appears to be to get such as are 
satisfactory to them. We make no change in our quotations for local 
securities, except for Gas Stock, which, affected by pending legislation, 
can be bought at 92. The demand for Insurance Stocks cannot be sup- 
plied at our previous quotations. The transactions in Bank Stocks and 
Water Stock are but nominal. 



THE MONARCH MTNING COMPANY. 
A meeting of the stockholders of this mine is advertised for the 27th 
inst. Let every stockholder who is not inside the ring attend on that 
occasion for the election of new officers to correct the management, or 
rather mismanagement, of those at present in office. We are in posses- 
sion of facts regarding this mine and its history, which we trust we shall 
not have to record. This entirely depends on how the election goes. If 
the present minority of outsiders is to be crushed, and their interests de- 
liberately sold for the benefit of the ring, we shall not hesitate to expose 
the whole nefarious scheme to the public, and make it warm for those 
engaged in the transaction. 

Latest from the Merchant's Exchange.— New York, Feb. 21st, 
1878.— Gold opened at 101? ; 11 A.M., at 10l£ ; 3 p.m, at lOlg. United 
States BondB— Five-twenties of 1867, 105f ; 1881, 103&. Sterling Ex- 
change, 4 83@4 85, short. Pacific Mail, 23$. Wheat, §1 35@S1 45, dull. 
Western Union, 76rV. Hides, 19@19£. Oil— Sperm, *1 01@$1 03. Win- 
ter Bleached, 1 20@1 25. Wool— Spring, fine, 20(S>,30 ; Burry. 11@15 ; 
Pulled, 25@40. Fall Clips, 1G@22 ; Burry, 14@23. London, Feb. 21st.— 
Liverpool Wheat Market, 12s. ld.@12s. 5d. Club, 12s. 4d.@12s.10d. 
United States Bonds, 104J@102|. Consols, 95§ ; 1 p.m., 95 7-16. 



Beerbohm's Telegram.— London and Liverpool, Feb. 22, 1878. — 
Floating Cargoes, 6d. dearer and firmer; Cargoes on Passage, very heavy; 
No. 2 Spring Off Coast, 49s.@49s6d.; Bo. for Shipment, 47s. Od.; Red 
Winter Off Coast, 53s.@53s. 3d.; California do., 58s.; Do., Nearly Due, 
58s.; Do., Just Shipped, 53s. Od.; Liverpool Spot Wheat, rather easier ; 
California Club, 12s. 7d.@12s. 10d.; Do. iverage, 12s. 2d.@12s. 5d.j Red 
Western Spring, 10s. 6d,@lls. Id.; Arrival Off Coast Wheat, small; 
Wheat on Passage for U. K., 1,263,000; Corn do., 383,000; Consols, 
95 11-16; Gold, lg@2j Sterling Exchange, 83@85. 



The traffic receipts on the railways of the United Kingdom for the 
week ended the 6th instant amounted, on 15,359^ miles, to £979,909, and 
for the corresponding week in 1877, on 15,260^ mdes, to £947,938, showing 
an increase of 89 miles and an increase of £31,971. 



Silver was quoted in London yesterday at 55d. per ounce, 925 fine ; 
Consols, 95g ; United States 5 per cent. Bonds, 104^, and 102£ for 4£ per 
cents., ex-coupon. 

The Liverpool wheat market yesterday stood at 13s. ld.@12s 5d. 
for average California, and 12s. 4d. to 12s. 10a. for Club. 

Brokers are buying Half-Dollars at 4@4.t per cent, discount, and are 
selling them at 3£@3£ per cent discount. 

Yesterday being a legal holiday, no financial quotations were re 
ceived from New York. 

The regular 3:30 p.m. trip of the Saucelito Ferry is now made at 2 
p.m. on Saturdays. 

The Sutro Tunnel is now within 1,225 feet of the west wall of the 
Comstock Lode. 

Legal Tenders here are weak at 97£ buying and 98 selling. 
Trade dollars are quoted at 96 buying and 96i selling. 



Printed and Published by the Proprietor, Frederick Marriott, 607 to 615 Merchant Street, San Francisco, California, 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Feb. 23, 1878. 



I SHALL BE 

I hear a footstep in the hall, 
I see a shadow on the wall — 
A moving shadow dark and tall — 
A voiceless shadow — this is all. 
No gentle footfall near the door, 
Thrills to my heart across the floor, 
And I am weary thinking o'er 
That music I shall hear no more — 
That tender music, soft and sweet — 
The melody of coming feet; 
I cry, and echo sends the call 
Back to my heart — and this is all. 
I feel a soft hand on my head, 
A hand whose touch seems over- 
spread 
"With balm like that the lilies shed 
O'er the white bosoms of the dead, 



"WITH THEE. 

And I am chill while memories fall 
Like perfumes o'er me — that is all. 
I feel the rhythm and the rhyme 
Of thy dear life keep sweetest time 
With God's sweet sounds, and over- 
climb 
All sounds with which they inter- 
chime. 
I see thee — hear thee — feel thy 

breath, 
In the still air which answereth 
With lightest kiss whene'er I call, 
'Mid tears for thee— and this is all. 
I cannot hear thee in the hall, 
Nor see thy shadow on the wall — 
Yet when the voice of God shall call 
I shall be with thee— thiB is all. 



"WHO WILL GET EGYPT? 

That the dismemberment of the Turkish Empire will result from the 
present war is now apparent to all. The terms which the victorious Czar 
will impose upon his fallen foe, though not announced, must inevitably 
involve the termination of Ottoman rule or misrule over much, if not all, 
of the Slav population, whether Russia Beeks her own aggrandisement or 
simply desires, as she protests she does, the emancipation of the Christian 
provinces. It is certainly improbable that after making such sacrifices 
and expending so much blood and treasure, that Russia would eonsent to 
a restoration of the former condition of things, particularly when the Ot- 
toman Empire is so far crushed as to lie under the compulsion of accept- 
ing any terms, however severe. So far as European Turkey is concerned, 
now that the imbecility of the Turkish Government has been clearly por- 
trayed, and a practical separation of a large proportion of the territory 
from all connection with the Sublime Porte is an accomplished fact, how- 
ever much objection might be made to the absorption of this by some of 
the Christian powers, particularly by Kussia, it is scarcely possible that in 
this enlightened age any civilized country should exert itself to remand 
the unfortunate people of Bulgaria or Servia to the control of the Mo- 
hammedan. Great Britain has certainly, through her officials, offered no 
protest against the termination of Turkish rule in Europe, nor could she 
hope at this time to maintain the Ottoman Empire as a factor in balancing 
power. Her only anxiety is relative to the acquisition of strength from 
the dismemberment which may accrue to Kussia or Germany, and her in- 
terest in the European provinces, now overrun by the Russian armies, is 
rather to guide them under the folds of the proper flag, or secure their 
organization into independent governments, as was done with Greece. It 
is true that Her Majesty's Government has an indirect interest in the sol- 
vency of the Turkish Empire, as so much British gold has been invested 
in Turkish bonds, while the English Government cannot claim the right 
to collect the interest or principal of these bonds at the point of the bay- 
onet, since they are individual ventures, yet they will serve as a sound ba- 
sis for Great Britain demanding some security for their payment. It is 
one of the probabilities, therefore, that while the Russian sword and Ger- 
man pen lop off Turkish territory in Europe, English diplomacy will cut 
off that which lies in Africa, taking the nominal sovereignty of the Porte 
over Egypt in satisfaction of all Turkish indebtedness to English sub- 
jects. For several years the eye of the British Government has been 
upon the valley of the Nile. The wonderful possibilities of that fertile 
country has firmly fixed itBelf in the minds of the British people, and re- 
cent explorations constantly add to the value of the historic land. The 
grasp which France had upon Egypt passed away with Sedan, and the great 
work of LessepB is now under the control of Englishmen, while the influ- 
ence of Britain over the Khedive is almost absolute. The progress which 
has been made in old Egypt during the last quarter of a century, wonder- 
ful aa it is, and pregnent with the promise of a future as bright and pros- 
perous as in the ancient days when flourished the mighty cities whose ru- 
ins now cover the desert, it is only a small part of the prospect which in- 
vites British energy, skill, and capital. Central Africa with its many 
millions of people and vast natural wealth will prove as rich a prize as did 
India in the past. The vast country around the White and Blue Nile 
known aa Soudan, and which Gordan Pacha, invested with absolute and 
irrevocable power, is now attempting to bring under subjection and con- 
solidate under one government tributary to the Xhedive, is rich in re- 
sources, and covered with vast flocks of cattle and sheep. Stanley has 
told ub something of the great country around and beyond Lake Tanga- 
nyki. The trade of Central Africa must pass through Egypt. Steamers 
already ply upon Lake Albert, and a railroad is under construction from 
Cairo to Khartoom, above which the Nile is navigable for a long distance 
for small craft. To control the 5,500,000 inhabitants of old Egypt, or 
what might be callled the Delta, is to control the Soudan with its 5,000,- 
000 people, and to have the last opportunity for developing the trade of 
the vast country through which Stanley lately traveled. Millions of 
pounds of British capital are already invested in canals, railways, steam- 
ship lines, and other improvements in Egypt, and through this the Khedive 
is even now almost powerless, having even transferred the revenues of his 
private estates into the hands of the creditors' Syndicate. In fact the 
Anglo-Saxon is to-day the controlling hand in the destinies of the "old 
house of bondage," and if Great Britain does not now get the full legal 
title to sovereignty, it will be consummated ere many years. 

The London " Economist" has the figures of the eastern absorption 
of silver for 1877, and claims that it rises to £20,390,000, reckoning what 
has gone from San Francisco and from European ports. The eastern ab- 
sorption has risen from £1,500,000 in 1870, when silver was 60(§i61 pence 
per ounce, to £20,390,000 in 1877, when silver was 54@.55 pence per ounce. 
Yet this enormous increase is unable to sustain the market. If this rate 
of increase is to continue, silver is not likely further to decline ; but, if it 
were to cease, the decline would go on. The speculative elements in the 
problem thus overshadow every datum of fact. 

" Hurrah! hurrah! " cried a young lawyer who succeeded to his 
father's practice, "I've settled that old lawsuit at last." " Settled it! " 
exclaimed the astonished parent ; " why, we've supported the family on 
that for the last ten years." 



Banks. 



NEVADA BANK OF S AN FBANCISCO, 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Paid Up Capital $10,000,000, Gold. 

Surplus (U. S. Bonds) 82,500,000, Gold. 

DIBECTORS: 

Louis McLane President. [ J. C. flood Vice-President. 

John W. Mackay, W. S. O'Brien, James GK Pair. 

Cashier C. T. Christ ens en. 

Agent at Virginia, Nevada George A. King. 

Issues Commercial and Travelers' Credits, available in any part of the world. 

Makes Transfers of Money by Telegraph and Cable, and Draws Exchange at cus- 
tomary usances. This Bank htis special facilities for dtaling in Bullion. 

EXCHANGE on the Principal Cities throughout the United States, Europe, Japan, 
China and the East Indies, the Australian Colonies and New Zealand, and on Hon- 
olulu, Hawaii. 

New York Bankers The Bank of New York, N. B. A. 

London Bankers Messrs. Smith, Payne & Smiths. 

[January 26.] 

THE BANE OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FBANCISCO. 

Capital .'...$5,000,000. 

D.o. MILLS President. | wm. ALVORD. ..Vice-Pres*t. 

THOMAS BROWX Cashier. 

Agbntb : 

New York, Agency of the Bank of Calfornia ; Boston, Tremont National Bank 
Chicago, Union National Bank ; St. Louis, Boatman's Saving Bank ; New Zealand, 
the Bank of New Zealand ; London, China, Japan, India and Australia, the Oriental 
Bank Corporation. 

The Bank has Agencies at Virginia City and Gold Hill, and Correspondents in all 
the principal Mining Districts and Interior Towns of the Pacific Coast. 

Letters of Credit issued, available in all parts of the world. Draw direct on Lon- 
don, Dublin, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, Hamburg, Frankfort-on-the-Main, Antwerp, 
Amsterdam, St. Petcrsburgh, Copenhagen, Stockholm, Christiana, Locarno, Mel- 
bourne, Sydney, Auckland, Hongkong, Shanghai, Yokohama. Nov. 4. 

BANE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter.— Capital paid np, $1,800,- 
000, with power to increase to 510,000,000. Southeast corner California and San- 
some streets. Head Office — 5 East India Avenue, London. Branches — Portland, Or- 
egon; Victoria and Cariboo, British Columbia. 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened subject to Check 
and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted available in all parts of 
the world. Approved Bills discounted and advances made on good collateral security. 
Draws direct at current rates upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents 
as follows : 

New York, Chicago and Canada— Bank of Montreal; Liverpool— North and South 
Wales Bank ; Scotland— British Linen Company ; Ireland — Bank of Ireland ; Mex- 
ico and South America — London Bank of Mexico and South America ; China and 
Japan — Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China, and Oriental Bank ; Australia 
and New Zealand— Bank of Australasia, Commercial Banking Company of Sydnev, 
and English, Scottish and Australian Chartered Bank, 

Dec. ». W. H . TILLINGHAST, Manager. 

THE FIRST NATIONAL GOLD BANE OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Paid np Capital $2,000,000, Cold. President, R. C. Wool- 
worth ; Vice-President, D. Callaghan ; Cashier, E, D. Morgan. 

Directors :— R. C. Woolworth, D. Callaghan, C. G. Hooker, C. Adolph Low, Peter 
Donahue, D. D. Colton, Edward Martin, James Moffitt, N. Van Bergen. 

Correspondents— London : Baring Bros. &Co.; Chartered Mercantile Bank of In- 
dia, London and China. Dublin : Provincial Bank of Ireland. Hamburg : Hesse, 
Neuman&Co. Paris: Hottinguer&Co. New York: National Bank of Commerce. Bos- 
ton : Blackstone National Bank. Chicago : First National Bank. This Bank is pre- 
pared to transact a general Banking business. Deposits in Gold, Silver and Currency 
received subject to check or on special deposit. Exchange for sale on the principal 
cities of the United States, Great Britain, Ireland and the Continent. Commercial 
Credits issued available in Europe, Chh.a and Japan. Collections attended to and 
prompt returns made at the lowest market rates of Exchange. Jan. 19. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANE (LIMITED). 

Capital, $5,006,000, of which $3,000,000 is fully paid np as 
present capital. Reserve Fund, §450,000. San Francisco Office, 42-1 Califor- 
nia street ; London Office, 22 Old Broad street. Manager, ARTHUR SCRIVENER ; 
Assistant Manager, CAMILO MARTIN; Cashier, WILLIAM STEEL, London 
Bankers, Bank of England and London Joint Stock Bank ; New York, Drexel, 
Morgan & Co. ; Boston, Third National Bank. This Bank is prepared to transact 
all kinds of General Banking and Exchange Business in Londou and San Francisco, 
and between said cities and all parts of the world. Jan. 19 

THE ANGLO-CALLFORNIAN BANE (LIMITED). 
4 '•P * y California street, San Francisco.— London Office, 8 

^3c./£"£> Angel Court ; New York Agents, J. W. Seligman & Co., 21 Broad street. 
Authorized Capital Stock, $6,000,000. Will receive Deposits, open Accounts, make 
Collections, buy and sell Exchange and Bullion, loan Money, and issue Letters of 
Credit available throughout the world. FRED. F. LOW, \ M 

IGN. STEINHART, f Mana S er 8- 
P. N. LILIENTHAL, Cashier. Oct 4. 

$400,000 TO LOAN 

On City and Country Real Estate. $250, OOO to loan on Gas, 
Water, Bank, Railroad and other securities. Mercantile Paper discounted and 
monev loaned upon all kinds of collateral security. 
August 18. JOHN T. LITTLE, 412 Montgomery street. 



THOMAS BLOXSOM "WRIGHT, Deceased. 

Notice. --The children, or other descendants of Xhoiuas 
Bloxsom Wright, formerly of Cranoe, in the County of Leicester, and after- 
wards of Southam, in the County of Warwick, in England, who died in or about the 
year 1873 (the children or other descendants of whom are entitled to a share of £534, 
and who are believed to be in America), may hear of something to their advantage 
by forwarding to Messrs. Fox, Solicitors, Lutterworth, or to Mr. Woodall, Solicitor, 
No. 7 Southampton street, Bloomsbury, London, their names and addresses, with full 
information as to the family of the said Thomas Bloxsom Wright, deceased. 

J. & B. H. C. FOX, Solicitors, Lutterworth, Leicestershire, Eng. 
Dated this 17th day of January, 1878. Feb. 16. 

NOBLE & GALLAGHER, 

Importers and Dealers in Painters' Materials, House, Sign 
and Fresco Painters, Plain and Decorative Paper-Hangers and Glaziers, No. 438 
Jackson street, between Montgomery and Sansome, San Francisco. Ceilings and 
Walls Kalsomined and Colored. Jobbing promptly attended to. May 13. 



1878. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



:\ 



LONG AGO. 
Tber* wm * lily of th* valley ; 

VM f*ir. jirWty and innocent 
In that »Uy, hut • 

,- titue ago. 

A long lime ajro ah* wm in bloom, 

With b«*r white baUl oomlag out »o humbly 
| time ago. 

]«r*on would pass hut wit. I : 
Lookl look! at the pnttjj lily, 

:rv and innocent — a long time ago. 

She died with the wind that Mew that night 
So hard that it killed hot with cold 
A kni| time ago. 

The rain and the lightning flashed 

And l*eat against the flower, 
And the ]»n-r thine, left unnoticed, 

1'ied in inUi-ry. 

more the pretty lily that was so innocent, 
But now a dead, ugly flower — 

A long time ago. Marie. 

The above waa written by a girl twelve years old, and only corrected by 
us a* to its orthography. 



AUGUSTINE TO 



AUGUSTA. 

to the youthful bride of Kins* 



Among the splendid presents given 
Alphonao ol Spain, a baaanfo] diamond rose. the. gift of the Prince I— 
penal, i» much admired ; the ex-Empress Bugenie semis her future Maj- 
nt necklace of sapphires and pearls. The carriages 
f«.r the nwrriafce ceremony will be like the Versailles state carriages, 
riebty trilt, with laiye glass windows : they are lined with white satin, 
and aret'i be drawn hy twelve white hnrses, attended by twelve grooms, 
who will l>e dreeaed in white satin, with bouquets of orange -flowers. 

I saw one dres* for the future Queen ; it is a white satin, Princesse- 
shape, with court train of ruby velvet, embroidered with gold ; but please 
bear in mind that, as I told you last week, most of the royal dresses are 
made in Madrid. The Ducheas de Sesto baa two handsome costumes made 
in Paris for the ceremony; the first is dark-blue velvet, with three high- 
flat flounces of old Alencon lace, separated by bauds of Russian sable fur; 
the bodice is Princesse -shape ; the court mantle being fixed to the bodice; 
silver embroidery, bands of sable fur (Zibeline), and old Alencon lace, 
adorn the mantle. The second dress for this lady is a pearl-grey satin, 
with three scarf-like folds of draped satin, embroidered with pale grey 
chenille flowers and pearls, and chenille fringes. The Princesse des As- 
toriafl will wear a light-blue satin costume, covered with pearls, arranged 
like shell? ; the s:Uin has a thin light blue tulle over it ; the train is 
draped tulle with scarf of the same light texture, embroidered with red 
carnation flowers. The Duchess d'Ossuna has two very exquisite dresses; 
the first is a rich brocade, light gr^en color ; the sides of the skirt are 
plaited horizontally, and a rich embroidery of gold and silver encircles 
and runs crossway over the plaits ; the mantel is emerald-green, with 
border of feathers, and silver and gold embroidery; the shape of the dress 
is the Princesse. The second costume is the Louis XIII. style in turquoise 
blue, figured velvet — a blue pattern — on a silver ground ; the train is pale 
bine faille, with border of figured turquoise velvet, and white satin edge. 
The Countess Feniandina has a pink-tinted lilac-faille dress, adorned with 
sweet-pea-flowers ; train of same silk, with border o*f white fox fur ; and 
also a second ccstume of white satin, embroidered with silver thistles, 
and chenille ribbons of dark brown color; train of dark-brown velvet, 
and silver fringes. I noticed only one ball-dress ; it was vieille or colored 
satin, prinuesse-shape, very high at the back, low in front, with long 
train ; a veil of white lace falls from the shoulders over the train, so as to 
form a court mantle. The sleeves are open at the elbow, adorned with 
white lace. There was a dress of light green satin, with stripes of che- 
nille velvet, vieille or color, the usual princesse shape. The skirt had two 
small flounces of green satin, lined with vieille or color ; the train of same 
striped silk, was adorned with rich Alencon lace. 

Here, in Paris, it is fashionable to wear black and dark-colored ut *; 
trimmed with bright colors, at dinner parties. For instance, black, dark 
brown, damask, or brocaded silk, or figured and cut velvet, adorned with 
yellow of all shades — emerald, blue, or ruby. Flowers are much seen on 
dresses, and in the hair. Marabout feathers are very much in favor, and 
moire' -antique or watered silk is decidedly coming into fashion. I for- 
got to tell you that there is also a dress made for Queen Isabella, but it 
is not considered likely she will go to Mad; id. The dress ib black satin, 
with mantle of black velvet embroidered with gold and silver.— Augustine 

in Truth. 

er'tu tied the'finoTof Inwtow in^hls line. _ Our California wines i aT 
day by day better appreciated in the East and in Europe, and the firm of 
G ,nd ach & Co., of this city, are in no slight degree conce roed mguj 
roccess Their Rhine Farm at Sonoma produces the ;. celebrated natiV 
white wine,, "Cabinet GntedeJ" "Traminer," "Riesling" and the ceU 
brated "Zinvandel" claret. Their cellars in San Francisco reach iron 
thf corner of Market and Second streets right down to StevenBon Btaee 



"A REMARKABLE FLAT." 
On Wednesday, the 20th Uiet.. the oomedj ">ir Bejaj wan played 
for the one thnoaaadt] 

■ it J tnoary 6th. 187& tl 
u uninterrupted ran from that daj to thla, and. Knowing i 

the hrt«t week "f last month money waa being turned away 
from thf d«>.. r*. wt should not be rarprleed wen it to keep tin- baardi for 
another 100 night* or so. In addition to the regular nightly perfbnnanot 

by the oomnanr. there have I n at least on< hundred mstloeea hy them 

at the \ anaefulfl and other London theetera. The original oast*, with 
two uoepttona, oontfnui to play, and to wearisome and monotonous have 
their nightly duties become to toe players, that thai . forget 

their line*, fhw //•"/.« has been for over two years played by s traveling 
company in the principal towns of Great Britain. It ir estimated that 
the author, Henry J. Byron, must at least have made (90,000 by h'xa 
work ; and as long nark as a year ago it was announoed that each of the 
two managers of the Vaudeville had made $100,000 by it. The play, 
which is familiar to our readers, having been up on two different occasions 
at the California Theater, has very little semblance of plot, and depended 
for its success on smart dialogue ; and the two characters, " Perkyn Mid- 
dle wick," the retired cheesemonger, and " Belinda," the lodging-house 
slavey, two types Of humanity whicli are to be met with daily in London, 
and which, when played to the life, as they are hy the original represent- 
atives, Mr. David .Tames and Miss Cicely Richards, appeal directly to the 
sympathies and understanding of an English audience. Those who have 
seen Mr. Lingard as " Perkyn "can have no conception of the character as 
portrayed hy Mr. James. When the play was originally produced, the 
management had no idea it would be such a success, and a member of the 
company offered to bet it would not run 50 nights. We believe there is 
not a regular playgoer In London who has not seen Our Bonn more than 
twice, and we have heard of people who have seen it a dozen times. A 
run of 1,000 nights is totally unprecedented in theatrical annals in Eng- 
land or elsewhere, and is likely to remain so, we think. Those that near- 
est approach it are Lord Dundreary, The Ticket of Leave Man, and Bur- 
lesque of Black Eyed Susan, all of which ran over 400 consecutive nights — 
the two former considerably more. The Vaudeville has been remarked 
for the longevity of its plays. It was here that the Two Roses first 
bloomed, aud ran for 300 nights ; the School for Scandal 404 nights (a run 
quite unapproached in the previous history of this fine old play); London 
Assurance, about 300 nights, and the burlesques of Romulus and Remus, and 
Very Last Days of Pompeii, about the same ; besides several others which 
have been played 50 or 200 nights each. A slijiht farce, called A Whirl- 
ioia, has, however, the honor of claiming the second longest run on record, 
for it has for more than 800 consecutive nights served as a prelude to 
Our Boys. 

" It is a sin to steal a pin." and a man in Philadelphia has been ar- 
rested for that very offence. The pin had a diamond attached to it. 

Savings and Loan. 

SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS UNION, 
532 California Street. Corner Webb, San Francisco. 

Deposits 81st December, 1877 98,544,738 07. 

Guarantee Capital ami Reserve Fund 8448,233 69. 

Directors:— JAMES DE FREMERY, President ; ALBERT MILLER, Vice-Presi- 
dent ; C. Adolphe Low, Charles Eaum, Erwin J. Crane, Washington Bartlett, Charles 
Pace, Denis J. Oliver, Alexander Campbell, Sr. 

LOVELL WHITE Cashier. | JOHN ARCHBALD Surveyor. 

HENRY C. CAMPBELL Attorney. 

Receives Deposits and loans money on Real Estate Security. County Remittances 
may be sent by Wells, Fargo & Co., or by checks of reliable parties, payable in San 
Francisco, but the responsibility of this Savings Bank commences only with the ac- 
tual receipt of the money. 

The signature of the Depositor should accompany the first deposit. No charge is 
made for pass book or entrance fee. Office Hours : 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. ; Saturday eve- 
nings, from ti& to 8- Feb. 9. 

THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

Deutsche Spar and Lelbbank, Bio 528 Californiastreet, San 
Francisco. Officers : President, L. GOTTIG Board of Directors.— Fred. 
Rouding, H. Schmieden, Chas. Kohler, Dan. Meyer, Edw. Kruse, George H. Eggers 
N. Van Bergen, H. L. Simon. Secretary, GEO. LETTE ; Attorney, JOHN R. 
JARBQE. July 2t- 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK — GUARANTEE CAPITAL. $300,000. 

Officers: President, John Parrott ; Vice-President, Jerome 
Lincoln ; Secretary, W. S. Jones ; Attorney, Sidney V. Smith. Loans made on 
Real Estate and other Approved Securities. Office : No. 215 Sansome street, San 
Francisco. Oct. 14. 

FRENCH SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 
Bnsh street, above Kearny, O. Mane, Director. Loans 

made on real estate and other collateral securities at current rates of 



411 

interest. 



Sot 1,uHe » JSt as the celebrated brands of French Cognac, ;_s .Ueaj 
- a crreat deal of the so-ca 
Defiance 



til J-'lSUVIi V w s — ~ , i — — - 

rnfinitelTpurerthan a great deal of the so-called French brandy. Gxnri 
!""»//.. -i **■„ f™ti, « n«fij«.nne " and "Banner' whiskies 



Tiller Stewart &Co., and the equally well known Lemps bt.J-.oi 
;eer ' Theory on an extensive trade with England Germany, Eton. 
nd the larger cities East, and lately sent a cask of ''Cabinet ggjdji 
1866 to Prince Bismarck. At no distant date it is safe .to J™*?* 
our wines will he as well known as our mining and a gricultural int 

The Spring atylea of gentlemen's clothing, as made by J. M. 
field & (£ ffonSomery street, are tl- neatest and g*"M 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Masonic Snvinjsrs and Loan Bank, No. 6 Post street, Ma. 
sonic Temple, San Francisco —At a meeting of the Board of Directors of this 
Bank, held January 21st, 1878, a dividend was declared at the rate of eight (8) per 
cent, per annum on Term Deposits, and six and three-tenths (6 3-10) per cent, per 
annum on Ordinary Deposits, for the semi-annual term ending January 28th, 1878, 
payable on and after January 28th, 1S78, free of Federal Tax. 
January 21, 1878. (Jan. 26.] H. T. GRAVES, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The Hibernia Savings anil Loan Society, Northeast Corner 
of Montgomery and Post streets, San Francisco, January 25, 1878.— At a regu- 
lar meeting of the Board of Directors of the society, held this day, a dividend at the 
rate of 7£ per cent, per annum was declared on all deposits for the six months end- 
ing on th'c 21st inst., payable from and alter this date, and free from Federal tax. 
Feb. 2. EDWARD MARTIN, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE 

The French Saving's and Loan Society has declared a Div- 
idend of Eight (8) per cent, per annum, free of Federal Tax, for the half year 
ending December 31st, 1S77, payable on and after January ISth, 1878. By order 
Jan? 19. OUSTAVE MAHE, Director. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Feb. 23, 1878. 



Theatrical, Etc. 



California Theater. — The Deluge ; or, Paradise Lost, was produced at 
this theater, on Monday evening, in a style that fully bore out the prom- 
ises made by the management. In every sense of the word, it is a mag- 
nificent spectacle. The text of the play itself is of the Miltonian declam- 
atory style, and, it is not too much to say, could be very largely " cut," if 
not indeed entirely eliminated, to the satisfaction of the aiidience. Its 
opportunities for scenic display, however, are extraordinary, and are fully 
taken advantage of. The first praise must in all candor be awarded to 
Mr. Voegtlin, whose clever brush has never shown to better advantage 
than in the gorgeous, elaborate and really artistic scenery with which 
every act is replete. It is a gratifying evidence of the public appreciation 
of his skill that the artist has been several times called before the cur- 
tain at each performance. The characters do not admit of much serious 
criticism, in a dramatic point of view. Mr. Keene, as " Satan," wore a 
number of most picturesque costumes, and delivered his blank verse with 
his usual emphasis. Mr. Mestayer, as "Cain" and " Tubal," was impres- 
sive and strong, which can also be said of Mr. Wilson as ''Adam" and 
"Japhet." Miss Ellie Wilton as "Eve," created qu te an impression by 
the picturesque beauty she gave to our first mother, albeit her fig leaves 
were not the sort of raiment our Sunday-school recollections had led us 
to look for. Her rendition was, on the whole, as flattering to the original 
as the latter could expect from one of her latter-day daughters. The hy- 
percritical mind might possibly demur at a conception of the mother of 
mankind which included a blonde wig and white satin slippers ; but the 
theologians who are just now tinkering up biblical matters so successfully 
will doubtless give us, in time, a Paradise with all the modern improve- 
ments, including gas, hot and cold water, and the daily papers. Among 
the other characters, Miss Frankie McClellan, Mr. Long, and others, de- 
serve creditable mention. Mr. Kiralfy's more than admirable ballet has 
less to do than in either of the pieces in which their former triumphs 
were made. The two principal ballets, however, in which they appear 
are artistic successes of the most emphatic kind. Their principal dance, 
called " Les Filles d'Eve," in the fourth act, in all its numbers, is the 
moBt perfect thing of the kind ever seen here. Taken as a whole, how- 
ever, we have nothing but unqualified praise for this third recent hit of 
Mr. Hill, and those who fail to see it lose a treat in this particular spe- 
cies of productions which we cannot expect soon aerain. 

Bush Street Theater. — It would be impossible to name a more dis- 
jrraceful and glaring aid to the corruption of our young men than the 
Parisian Cancan, now being nightly danced at this Theater, as an 
exhibition tendering to the demoralization of our youth and pander- 
ing to the lowest senses of old men, of whom the audiences are pretty 
equally composed. We have never witnessed anythingmore disgustingthan 
this display of morethan semi-nudity, and the obscenity is hightened by the 
suggestive gestures and remarksof the women dancers. We have seen the 
Cancan at London theaters on many occasions, when its performance has 
broughtdown scathingdenunciationsfromthepresson the management, and 
at one establishment, where itwasdanced by the Col»»nna Troupe, of which, 
if we remember rightly, Sara the Kicker was a member, the Lord Cham- 
berlain put a stop to it by withdrawing the license, as in his opinion it 
tended to debase the morals of the community. Not one, however, of 
those performances equaled that now being given for the delectation of 
playgoers, for everything that is grossly lewd and offensive to respectabil- 
ity. If it be an actual necessity that such incentives to vice should take 
place, let them be immediately relegated to the dives, whose frequenters, 
we imagine, have rarely seen anything so utterly indecent. We cannot 
understand how such a business-like and practical manager as Mr. Locke 
has proved himself to be, can tolerate anything of the sort at his hitherto 
popular and well conducted theater. We are not advocates for a censor- 
ship of the stage, but if such scenes as those enacted nightly at Bush 
street are to continue, it is time some one is appointed with authority to 
suppress them, if the police have not already the power to do so, as we 
imagine they must have. 

Grand Opera House.— Uncle Tom's Cabin continues to attract large 
houses at the mammoth theater. In some important respects and in 
general details the acting has improved somewhat since our last criticism, 
which it could well afford to do. As heretofore, the singing and planta- 
tion scenes of the freedmen are the chief attractions. The child Zoie 
Tuttle does not improve materially as regards the unnatural staginess 
of utterance mentioned in our last. Inattention to this fault, on the part 
of her preceptors, is a real detriment to this clever little embryo actress, 
who, if left to herself, would be more childishly natural, and therefore, 
of course, more effective. The piece appears to be good for an extended 
run. 

Herold's Fifth Matinee was largely attended last Wednesday, in 
spite of the stormy weather. Mr.